HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Decompression Sickness
Decompression sickness
Decompression sickness
(DCS; also known as divers' disease, the bends or caisson disease) describes a condition arising from dissolved gases coming out of solution into bubbles inside the body on depressurisation. DCS most commonly refers to problems arising from underwater diving decompression (i.e., during ascent), but may be experienced in other depressurisation events such as emerging from a caisson, flying in an unpressurised aircraft at altitude, and extravehicular activity from spacecraft. DCS and arterial gas embolism are collectively referred to as decompression illness. Since bubbles can form in or migrate to any part of the body, DCS can produce many symptoms, and its effects may vary from joint pain and rashes to paralysis and death. Individual susceptibility can vary from day to day, and different individuals under the same conditions may be affected differently or not at all
[...More...]

"Decompression Sickness" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Abdominal
The abdomen (less formally called the belly, stomach, tummy or midriff) constitutes the part of the body between the thorax (chest) and pelvis, in humans and in other vertebrates. The region occupied by the abdomen is termed the abdominal cavity. In arthropods it is the posterior tagma of the body; it follows the thorax or cephalothorax.[1][2] The abdomen stretches from the thorax at the thoracic diaphragm to the pelvis at the pelvic brim. The pelvic brim stretches from the lumbosacral joint (the intervertebral disc between L5 and S1) to the pubic symphysis and is the edge of the pelvic inlet. The space above this inlet and under the thoracic diaphragm is termed the abdominal cavity
[...More...]

"Abdominal" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Nausea
Nausea is a sensation of unease and discomfort in the upper stomach with an involuntary urge to vomit.[1] It may precede vomiting, but a person can have nausea without vomiting. When prolonged, it is a debilitating symptom.[2] Nausea is a non-specific symptom, which means that it has many possible causes. Some common causes of nausea are motion sickness, dizziness, migraine, fainting, low blood sugar, gastroenteritis (stomach infection) or food poisoning. Nausea is a side effect of many medications including chemotherapy, or morning sickness in early pregnancy. Nausea may also be caused by anxiety, disgust and depression.[3][4][5] Medications taken to prevent and treat nausea are called antiemetics. The most commonly prescribed antiemetics in the US are promethazine, metoclopramide and ondansetron
[...More...]

"Nausea" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Fecal Incontinence
Fecal incontinence
Fecal incontinence
(FI), also known as anal incontinence, or in some forms encopresis, is a lack of control over defecation, leading to involuntary loss of bowel contents—including flatus (gas), liquid stool elements and mucus, or solid feces. FI is a sign or a symptom, not a diagnosis. Incontinence can result from different causes and might occur with either constipation or diarrhea. Continence is maintained by several inter-related factors, including the anal sampling mechanism, and usually there is more than one deficiency of these mechanisms for incontinence to develop
[...More...]

"Fecal Incontinence" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Urinary Incontinence
Urinary incontinence
Urinary incontinence
(UI), also known as involuntary urination, is any uncontrolled leakage of urine
[...More...]

"Urinary Incontinence" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Paralysis
Paralysis is a loss of muscle function for one or more muscles. Paralysis can be accompanied by a loss of feeling (sensory loss) in the affected area if there is sensory damage as well as motor. About 1 in 50 people in the U.S. have been diagnosed with some form of paralysis, transient or permanent.[1] The word comes from the Greek παράλυσις, "disabling of the nerves",[2] itself from παρά (para), "beside, by"[3] and λύσις (lysis), "losing"[4] and that from λύω (luō), "to lose".[5] A paralysis accompanied by involuntary tremors is usually called "palsy".[6][7]Contents1 Causes 2 Variations 3 Other animals3.1 Invertebrates 3.2 Vertebrates4 See also 5 ReferencesCauses[edit] Paralysis is most often caused by damage in the nervous system, especially the spinal cord
[...More...]

"Paralysis" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Spinal Cord
The spinal cord is a long, thin, tubular bundle of nervous tissue and support cells that extends from the medulla oblongata in the brainstem to the lumbar region of the vertebral column. The brain and spinal cord together make up the central nervous system (CNS). In humans, the spinal cord begins at the occipital bone where it passes through the foramen magnum, and meets and enters the spinal canal at the beginning of the cervical vertebrae. The spinal cord extends down to between the first and second lumbar vertebrae where it ends. The enclosing bony vertebral column protects the relatively shorter spinal cord. It is around 45 cm (18 in) in men and around 43 cm (17 in) long in women
[...More...]

"Spinal Cord" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Non-epileptic Seizure
Non-epileptic seizures are paroxysmal events that mimic an epileptic seizure but do not involve abnormal, rhythmic discharges of cortical neurons.[1] They are caused by either physiological or psychological conditions. The latter is discussed more fully in psychogenic non-epileptic seizures.Contents1 Diagnosis 2 Terminology 3 Causes 4 Footnotes 5 External linksDiagnosis[edit] A wide array of phenomena may resemble epileptic seizures, which may lead to people who do not have epilepsy being misdiagnosed. Indeed, a significant percentage of people initially diagnosed with epilepsy will later have this revised
[...More...]

"Non-epileptic Seizure" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Amnesia
Amnesia is a deficit in memory caused by brain damage, disease, or psychological trauma.[1] Amnesia can also be caused temporarily by the use of various sedatives and hypnotic drugs. The memory can be either wholly or partially lost due to the extent of damage that was caused.[2] There are two main types of amnesia: retrograde amnesia and anterograde amnesia. Retrograde amnesia is the inability to retrieve information that was acquired before a particular date, usually the date of an accident or operation.[3] In some cases the memory loss can extend back decades, while in others the person may lose only a few months of memory. Anterograde amnesia
Anterograde amnesia
is the inability to transfer new information from the short-term store into the long-term store. People with this type of amnesia cannot remember things for long periods of time
[...More...]

"Amnesia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Hyperesthesia
Hyperesthesia (or hyperaesthesia) is a condition that involves an abnormal increase in sensitivity to stimuli of the sense. "When a non-noxious stimulus causes the sensation of pain the area will be termed hyperaesthetic".[1] Stimuli of the senses can include sound that one hears, foods that one tastes, textures that one feels, and so forth. Increased touch sensitivity is referred to as "tactile hyperesthesia", and increased sound sensitivity is called "auditory hyperesthesia". Tactile hyperesthesia may be a common symptom of many neurologic disorders such as herpes zoster, peripheral neuropathy and radiculopathies
[...More...]

"Hyperesthesia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Pitting Edema
Edema, also spelled oedema or œdema, is an abnormal accumulation of fluid in the interstitium, located beneath the skin and in the cavities of the body, which can cause severe pain. Clinically, edema manifests as swelling. The amount of interstitial fluid is determined by the balance of fluid homeostasis; and the increased secretion of fluid into the interstitium. The word is from Greek οἴδημα oídēma meaning "swelling".[1]Contents1 Classifications1.1 Generalized 1.2 Organ-specific2 Mechanism 3 Treatment 4 Gallery 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksClassifications[edit] Cutaneous edema is referred to as "pitting" when, after pressure is applied to a small area, the indentation persists after the release of the pressure. Peripheral pitting edema, as shown in the illustration, is the more common type, resulting from water retention
[...More...]

"Pitting Edema" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Formication
In medicine, Formication is the sensation that resembles that of small insects crawling on (or under) the skin. It is one specific form of a set of sensations known as paresthesias, which also include the more common prickling, tingling sensation known as "pins and needles". Formication is a well documented symptom, which has numerous possible causes. The word is derived from formica, the Latin
Latin
word for ant. Formication may sometimes be experienced as feelings of itchiness, tingling, pins and needles, burning, or even pain
[...More...]

"Formication" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Headache
Headache
Headache
is the symptom of pain anywhere in the region of the head or neck. It occurs in migraines (sharp, or throbbing pains), tension-type headaches, and cluster headaches.[1] Frequent headaches can affect relationships and employment.[1] There is also an increased risk of depression in those with severe headaches.[1] Headaches can occur as a result of many conditions whether serious or not. There are a number of different classification systems for headaches. The most well-recognized is that of the International Headache
Headache
Society. Causes of headaches may include fatigue, sleep deprivation, stress, the effects of medications, the effects of recreational drugs, viral infections, loud noises, common colds, head injury, rapid ingestion of a very cold food or beverage, and dental or sinus issues. Treatment of a headache depends on the underlying cause, but commonly involves pain medication
[...More...]

"Headache" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Neurological
Neurology
Neurology
(from Greek: νεῦρον (neûron), "string, nerve" and the suffix -logia, "study of") is a branch of medicine dealing with disorders of the nervous system. Neurology
Neurology
deals with the diagnosis and treatment of all categories of conditions and disease involving the central and peripheral nervous systems (and their subdivisions, the autonomic and somatic nervous systems), including their coverings, blood vessels, and all effector tissue, such as muscle.[1] Neurological practice relies heavily on the field of neuroscience, which is the scientific study of the nervous system. A neurologist is a physician specializing in neurology and trained to investigate, or diagnose and treat neurological disorders.[2] Neurologists
Neurologists
may also be involved in clinical research, clinical trials, and basic or translational research
[...More...]

"Neurological" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Infarction
Infarction
Infarction
is tissue death (necrosis) due to inadequate blood supply to the affected area. It may be caused by artery blockages, rupture, mechanical compression or vasoconstriction.[1] The resulting lesion is referred to as an infarct[2][3] (from the Latin infarctus, "stuffed into").[4]Contents1 Causes 2 Classification2.1 By histopathology 2.2 By localization3 Associated diseases 4 References 5 External linksCauses[edit]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (August 2011) (Learn how and when to remove this template message) Infarction
Infarction
occurs as a result of prolonged ischemia, which is the insufficient supply of oxygen and nutrition to an area of tissue due to a disruption in blood supply
[...More...]

"Infarction" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.