HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

Declarative Sentence
In non-functional linguistics, a sentence is a textual unit consisting of one or more words that are grammatically linked. In functional linguistics, a sentence is a unit of written texts delimited by graphological features such as upper case letters and markers such as periods, question marks, and exclamation marks
[...More...]

"Declarative Sentence" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Linguistics
Linguistics
Linguistics
is the scientific[1] study of language,[2] and involves an analysis of language form, language meaning, and language in context.[3] The earliest activities in the documentation and description of language have been attributed to the 4th century BC Indian grammarian Pāṇini,[4][5] who wrote a formal description of the Sanskrit
Sanskrit
language in his Aṣṭādhyāyī.[6] Linguists traditionally analyse human language by observing an interplay between sound and meaning.[7] Phonetics is the study of speech and non-speech sounds, and delves into their acoustic and articulatory properties
[...More...]

"Linguistics" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Sentence Word
A sentence word (also called a one-word sentence) is a single word that forms a full sentence. Henry Sweet
Henry Sweet
described sentence words as "a variety of words which have the peculiarity of always forming a sentence by themselves" and gave words such as "Come!", "John!", "Alas!", "Yes." and "No." as examples of sentence words.[1] The Dutch linguist J. M. Hoogvliet described sentence words as "volzinwoorden".[2] They were also noted in 1891 by Georg von der Gabelentz, whose observations were extensively elaborated by Hoogvliet in 1903; he does not list "Yes." and "No." as sentence words
[...More...]

"Sentence Word" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Phone (phonetics)
In phonetics and linguistics, a phone is any distinct speech sound or gesture, regardless of whether the exact sound is critical to the meanings of words. In contrast, a phoneme is a speech sound that, in a given language, if it were swapped with another phoneme, would change the meaning of the word. Phones are absolute, not specific to any language, but phonemes can be discussed only in reference to specific languages. For example, the English words kid and kit end with two distinct phonemes, and swapping one for the other would change the word's meaning. However, the difference between the p sounds in pun (pʰ, with aspiration) and spun (p, no aspiration) never affects the meaning of a word in English so they are phones and not phonemes
[...More...]

"Phone (phonetics)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Grammatical Polarity
In linguistics and grammar, affirmation and negation (abbreviated respectively AFF and NEG) are the ways that grammar encode negative and positive polarity in verb phrases, clauses, or other utterances. Essentially an affirmative (positive) form is used to express the validity or truth of a basic assertion, while a negative form expresses its falsity. Examples are the sentences "Jane is here" and "Jane is not here"; the first is affirmative, while the second is negative. The grammatical category associated with affirmative and negative is called polarity. This means that a sentence, verb phrase, etc. may be said to have either affirmative or negative polarity (its polarity may be either affirmative or negative). Affirmative is typically the unmarked polarity, whereas a negative statement is marked in some way, whether by a negating word or particle such as English not, an affix such as Japanese -nai, or by other means, which reverses the meaning of the predicate
[...More...]

"Grammatical Polarity" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Inflectional Phrase
In X-bar theory
X-bar theory
and other grammatical theories that incorporate it, an inflectional phrase or inflection phrase (IP or InflP) is a functional phrase that has inflectional properties (such as tense and agreement). An inflectional phrase is essentially the same as a sentence, but reflects an analysis whereby a sentence can be treated as having a head, complement and specifier, like other kinds of phrases.Contents1 Definition 2 Variations 3 References 4 See alsoDefinition[edit] An inflectional phrase is a phrase that contains as its head an abstract category called Infl (short for 'inflection'). The Infl head bears inflectional properties such as tense and person, and may or may not be realised as separate words in the surface representation of the phrase
[...More...]

"Inflectional Phrase" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Periodic Sentence
A periodic sentence is a stylistic device employed at the sentence level, described as one that is not complete grammatically or semantically before the final clause or phrase.[1]Contents1 Characteristics 2 Decline 3 Rhetorical and literary usage 4 See also 5 ReferencesCharacteristics[edit] The periodic sentence emphasizes its main idea by placing it at the end, following all the subordinate clauses and other modifiers that support the principal idea.[2] The sentence unfolds gradually, so that the thought contained in the subject/verb group only emerges at the sentence's conclusion.[3] Obviously artificial, it is used mostly in what in oratory is called the grand style.[4] It is the opposite of the loose sentence, also continuous or running style, where the subject and verb are introduced at the beginning of the sentence.[3] Periodic sentences often rely on hypotaxis, whereas running sentences are typified by parataxis.[5]
[...More...]

"Periodic Sentence" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Sentence Arrangement
Sentence arrangement refers to the location of ideas and the placement of emphasis within a sentence. Based on these factors, a sentence may be classified as loose, balanced, periodic, or cumulative. Examples[edit] A loose sentence expresses the main thought near the beginning and adds explanatory material as needed.We bashed the piñata for 15 minutes without denting it, although we at least avoided denting one another's craniums and, with masks raised, finally pried the candy out with a screwdriver.A cumulative sentence places the general idea in the main clause and gives it greater precision with modifying words, phrases, or clauses placed before it, after it, or in the middle of it
[...More...]

"Sentence Arrangement" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Sentence Function
In linguistics, sentence function refers to a speaker's purpose in uttering a specific sentence, phrase, or clause. Whether a listener is present or not is sometimes irrelevant. It answers the question: "Why has this been said?" The four basic sentence functions in the world's languages include the declarative, interrogative, exclamative, and the imperative. These correspond to a statement, question, exclamation, and command respectively. Typically, a sentence goes from one function to the next through a combination of changes in word order, intonation, the addition of certain auxiliaries or particles, or other times by providing a special verbal form. The four main categories can be further specified as being either communicative or informative.Contents1 Communicative vs. informative1.1 Communicative sentences1.1.1 Exclamatory 1.1.2 Imperative1.2 Informative sentences1.2.1 Declarative 1.2.2 Interrogative2 Declarative vs. affirmative vs
[...More...]

"Sentence Function" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

T-unit
In linguistics, the term T-unit was coined by Kellogg Hunt in 1965.[1] It is defined as the "shortest grammatically allowable sentences into which (writing can be split) or minimally terminable unit." Often, but not always, a T-unit is a sentence. More technically, a T-unit is a dominant clause and its dependent clauses: as Hunt said, it is "one main clause with all subordinate clauses attached to it" (Hunt 1965:20). T-units are often used in the analysis of written and spoken discourse, such as in studies on errors in second language writing. The number of error-free T-units may be counted, as in Robb et al
[...More...]

"T-unit" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Dictionary.com
Dictionary.com is an online dictionary whose domain was first registered on May 14, 1995.[1] The company was founded by Brian Kariger and Daniel Fierro as part of Lexico Publishing, which also started Thesaurus.com and Reference.com.[2] In 2008, Dictionary.com was acquired by Ask.com, an IAC company.[2]Contents1 Content 2 Features and apps 3 References 4 External linksContent[edit] The content for Dictionary.com is based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, with other content from the Collins English Dictionary, American Heritage Dictionary
Dictionary
and others.[3] Features and apps[edit] On Monday, May 3, 1999, Dictionary.com began its Word of the Day feature.[4] In April 2009, Dictionary.com offered their first dictionary app in the iOS App Store
[...More...]

"Dictionary.com" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

International Standard Book Number
The International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique.[a][b] Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each separate edition and variation (except reprintings) of a publication. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book will each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is ten digits long if assigned before 2007, and thirteen digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-specific and varies between countries, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN identification format was devised in 1967, based upon the 9-digit Standard Book
Book
Numbering (SBN) created in 1966
[...More...]

"International Standard Book Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Philosophy Of Language
Philosophy
Philosophy
of language explores the relationship between language and reality, in particular, philosophy of language studies issues that cannot be addressed by other fields, like linguistics, or psychology. Major topics in philosophy of language include the nature of meaning, intentionality, reference, the constitution of sentences, concepts, learning, and thought. The topic that has received the most attention in philosophy of language has been the nature of meaning, to explain what "meaning" is, and what we mean when we talk about meaning. Within this area, issues include: the nature of synonymy, the origins of meaning itself, and our apprehension of meaning
[...More...]

"Philosophy Of Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Rhetorical Question
A rhetorical question is a figure of speech in the form of a question that is asked to make a point rather than to elicit an answer.[1] Though a rhetorical question does not require a direct answer, in many cases it may be intended to start a discussion or at least draw an acknowledgement that the listener understands the intended message. A common example is the question "Can't you do anything right?" This question, when posed, is intended not to ask about the listener's ability, but rather to insinuate the listener's lack of ability.Contents1 Different forms1.1 Negative assertions 1.2 Rhetorical questions as metaphors 1.3 Other forms2 Punctuation 3 Quotes 4 See also 5 Notes 6 External linksDifferent forms[edit] Negative assertions[edit] A rhetorical question may be intended as a challenge. The question is often difficult or impossible to answer
[...More...]

"Rhetorical Question" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

List Of Philosophers Of Language
This is a list of philosophers of language.Virgil Aldrich William Alston G. E. M. Anscombe Karl-Otto Apel Aristotle J. L. Austin Alfred Jules Ayer Joxe Azurmendi Jody Azzouni Kent Bach Ingeborg Bachmann Archie J. Bahm Yehoshua Bar-Hillel Walter Benjamin Jonathan Bennett Henri Bergson Max Black Paul Boghossian Andrea Bonomì Jacques Bouveresse F. H. Bradley Robert Brandom Berit Brogaard Herman Cappelen Rudolf Carnap Hector-Neri Castañeda Stanley Cavell David Chalmers Cheung Kam Ching Noam Chomsky Alonzo Church Nino Cocchiarella James F. Conant William Crathorn Donald Davidson Arda Denkel Michael Devitt Keith Donnellan William C. Dowling César Chesneau Dumarsais Michael Dummett David Efird S
[...More...]

"List Of Philosophers Of Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.