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Decennial
An anniversary is the date on which an event took place or an institution was founded in a previous year, and may also refer to the commemoration or celebration of that event. For example, the first event is the initial occurrence or, if planned, the inaugural of the event. One year later would be the first anniversary of that event. The word was first used for Catholic feasts to commemorate saints. Most countries celebrate national anniversaries, typically called national days. These could be the date of independence of the nation or the adoption of a new constitution or form of government
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Anniversary (other)
An anniversary is a day that commemorates and/or celebrates an event that occurred on the same day of the year, of the initial event. Anniversary
Anniversary
may also refer to:"Anniversary" (short story), a 1959 short story by Isaac Asimov Anniversary
Anniversary
(film), a 2015 Hong Kong film The
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Birthstones
A birthstone is a gemstone that represents a person's month of birth. Birthstones are often worn as jewelry and as pendants.Some common birthstonesContents1 History of birthstones1.1 Western custom1.1.1 Traditional birthstones 1.1.2 Modern birthstones 1.1.3 Eastern Traditions2 Birthstones by cultures 3 Zodiacal3.1 Tropical zodiac4 Birthday (day of the week) stones 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory of birthstones[edit] Western custom[edit] The first century Jewish historian Josephus
Josephus
believed there was a connection between the twelve stones in Aaron's breastplate (signifyi
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Robert L. Chapman
Robert Lundquist Chapman (December 28, 1920 – January 27, 2002) was an American professor of English literature who edited several dictionaries and thesauri. Chapman was born in Huntington, West Virginia
Huntington, West Virginia
to Curtis W. Chapman, a typewriter mechanic, and Cecelia Lundquist Chapman, a homemaker. Chapman graduated from Detroit- Cooley High School
Cooley High School
in 1939. As a young man, he worked in factories and drove a truck, then enrolled at the University of Michigan
University of Michigan
to study English literature. One of his teachers at Michigan was the poet W.H. Auden. Chapman's college career was interrupted by World War II, when he served in Europe with the United States Army
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William Safire
William Lewis Safire[1] (/ˈsæfaɪər/; December 17, 1929 – September 27, 2009)[2] was an American author, columnist, journalist, and presidential speechwriter. He was a long-time syndicated political columnist for The New York Times and the author of "On Language" in The New York Times
The New York Times
Magazine, a column on popular etymology, new or unusual usages, and other language-related topics from its inception.Contents1 Early life 2 Career2.1 Writing on English3 Political views 4 Death 5 Bibliography 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksEarly life[edit] Safire was born William Lewis Saf
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Sestertius
The sestertius (plural sestertii), or sesterce (plural sesterces), was an ancient Roman coin. During the Roman Republic
Roman Republic
it was a small, silver coin issued only on rare occasions. During the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
it was a large brass coin. The name sestertius means "two and one half", referring to its nominal value of two and a half asses (a bronze Roman coin, singular as), a value that was useful for commerce because it was one quarter of a denarius, a coin worth ten asses. The name is derived from semis, "half" and "tertius", "third", in which "third" refers to the third as: the sestertius was worth two full asses and half of a third. English-language sources routinely use the original Latin form sestertius, plural sestertii; but older literature frequently uses sesterce, plural sesterces, terce being the English equivalent of tertius
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Brown University
Brown University
Brown University
is a private Ivy League
Ivy League
research university in Providence, Rhode Island, United States. Founded in 1764 as the College in the English Colony of Rhode Island
Rhode Island
and Providence Plantations, it is the seventh-oldest institution of higher education in the U.S. and one of the nine colonial colleges chartered before the American Revolution.[7] At its foundation, Brown was the first college in the U.S. to accept students regardless of their religious affiliation.[8] Its engineering program, the first in the Ivy League, was established in 1847. It was one of the early doctoral-granting U.S. institutions in the late 19th century, adding masters and doctoral studies in 1887.[9] Its New Curriculum is sometimes referred to in education theory as the Brown Curriculum and was adopted by faculty vote in 1969 after a period of student lobbying
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Princeton University
Princeton University
Princeton University
is a private Ivy League
Ivy League
research university in Princeton, New Jersey
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Washington And Lee University
Washington and Lee University
Washington and Lee University
(Washington and Lee or W&L) is a private liberal arts university in Lexington, Virginia, United States. Washington and Lee's 325-acre campus sits at the edge of Lexington and abuts the campus of the Virginia
Virginia
Military Institute (founded 1839) in the Shenandoah Valley
Shenandoah Valley
region along the Shenandoah River
Shenandoah River
of the western part of the Commonwealth of Virginia
Virginia
between the Blue Ridge Mountains and the Allegheny Mountains
Allegheny Mountains
in the eastern ranges of the Appalachian Mountains
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Millennium
A millennium (plural millennia or millenniums) is a period equal to 1000 years,[1] also called kiloyears. It derives from the Latin
Latin
mille, thousand, and annus, year. It is often, but not always, related to a particular dating system. Sometimes, it is used specifically for periods of a thousand years that begin at the starting point (initial reference point) of the calendar in consideration (typically the year "1"), or in later years that are whole number multiples of a thousand years after it
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Emily Post
Emily Post
Emily Post
(c. October 27, 1872 – September 25, 1960) was an American author famous for writing about etiquette. Brooklyn Museum
Brooklyn Museum
Emily Post
Emily Post
– Emil FuchsContents1 Early life1.1 Marriage to Post2 Career 3 Death 4 Notable descendants 5 Legacy 6 See also 7 Notes 8 References 9 External linksEarly life[edit] Post was born Emily Price in Baltimore, Maryland, possibly in October 1872[1] (the precise date is disputed).[a] Her father was the architect, Bruce Price, and her mother was Josephine (Lee) Price of Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. After being educated at home in her early years, Price attended Miss Graham's finishing school in New York after her family moved there.[3] The New York Times' Dinitia Smith reports, in her review of Laura Claridge's 2008 biography of Post,[4]Emily was tall, pretty and spoiled
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List Of Historical Anniversaries
Condensed list of historical anniversaries.v t eMonths and days of the yearToday: April
April
7, 2018January1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31February1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29March1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31April1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30May1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24
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Platinum Jubilee
A platinum jubilee is a celebration held to mark an anniversary. Among monarchies, it usually refers to a 70th anniversary.[1]Monarch Accession Day CommemorationLouis XIV of France 1643 1713Johann II, Prince of Liechtenstein 1858 1928 Sobhuza II
Sobhuza II
of Swaziland 10 December 1899 1969King Bhumibol of Thailand 9 June 1946 2016[2] Bhumibol Adulyadej
Bhumibol Adulyadej
of Thailand
Thailand
was the most recent monarch to celebrate a platinum jubilee; he died shortly after official celebrations in Thailand
Thailand
took place
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Quinquennial Neronia
The quinquennial Neronia was a massive Greek-style festival created by the Roman Emperor
Roman Emperor
Nero. The festival was in three parts. The first was music, oratory and poetry, the second was gymnastics, and the last was riding. It was held twice—once in AD 60 and once in AD 65. These games followed a tradition set by Julius Caesar
Julius Caesar
and Augustus
Augustus
of having celebratory games to mark the anniversary of their reign. Timing of the quinquennial Neronia has puzzled historians. "Quinquennial" means "every five" but in practice means every four. Romans counted things inclusively. So between 1 and 5, there are 4 years
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
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International Standard Serial Number
An International Standard Serial Number
International Standard Serial Number
(ISSN) is an eight-digit serial number used to uniquely identify a serial publication.[1] The ISSN is especially helpful in distinguishing between serials with the same title. ISSN are used in ordering, cataloging, interlibrary loans, and other practices in connection with serial literature.[2] The ISSN system was first drafted as an International Organization for Standardization (ISO) international standard in 1971 and published as ISO 3297 in 1975.[3] ISO subcommittee TC 46/SC 9 is responsible for maintaining the standard. When a serial with the same content is published in more than one media type, a different ISSN is assigned to each media type. For example, many serials are published both in print and electronic media
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