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Debtor
A debtor is an entity that owes a debt to another entity. The entity may be an individual, a firm, a government, a company or other legal person. The counterparty is called a creditor. When the counterpart of this debt arrangement is a bank, the debtor is more often referred to as a borrower. If X borrowed money from his/her bank, X is the debtor and the bank is the creditor. If X puts money in the bank, X is the creditor and the bank is the debtor. It is not a crime to fail to pay a debt. Except in certain bankruptcy situations, debtors can choose to pay debts in any priority they choose. But if one fails to pay a debt, they have broken a contract or agreement between them and a creditor. Generally, most oral and written agreements for the repayment of consumer debt - debts for personal, family or household purposes secured primarily by a person's residence - are enforceable. [1] For the most part, debts that are business related must be made in writing to be enforceable by law
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The Borrowers (other)
The Borrowers is a 1952 juvenile fantasy novel by Mary Norton. The Borrowers may also refer to:One of several film and television adaptations of the novel:The Borrowers (1973 film), a 1973 television adaptation The Borrowers (miniseries), a 1992 television miniseries The Borrowers (1997 film), a 1997 film The Secret World of Arrietty, a 2010 Japanese film also known as The Borrower Arrietty or simply Arrietty. The Borrowers (2011 film), a 2011 television filmThe Borrower, a 1991 science-fiction horror filmSee also[edit]borrower, a recipient of a loanThis disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title The Borrowers. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the
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Loan Covenant
A loan covenant is a condition in a commercial loan or bond issue that requires the borrower to fulfill certain conditions or which forbids the borrower from undertaking certain actions, or which possibly restricts certain activities to circumstances when other conditions are met. Typically, violation of a covenant may result in a default on the loan being declared, penalties being applied, or the loan being called. The legal provision in the loan agreement providing for the loan to be "called" is the "Acceleration Clause": once the buyer defaults, all future payments due under the loan are "accelerated" and deemed to be due and payable immediately. [1] Covenants may also be waived, either temporarily or permanently, usually at the sole discretion of the lender. Function[edit] Covenants are undertakings given by a borrower as part of a term loan agreement. Their purpose is to help the lender ensure that the risk attached to the loan does not unexpectedly deteriorate prior to maturity
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garb
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Simplified Individual Voluntary Arrangement
In the United Kingdom, a simplified IVA (SIVA) was a proposed new form of IVA (individual voluntary arrangement), which would have been a formal alternative of clearing debt without being declared bankrupt. The new regime was likely to have been two tiers:Tier 1 would have had an upper limit of £25–30,000, and Tier 2 an upper limit of £75,000.Also, the approval of an SIVA was likely to have been based on a simple majority instead of the existing 75%. The government decided not to proceed with the proposals for SIVA in November 2008. Simplified IVA plans withdrawn[edit] In December 2008 The plans announced to modify the Insolvency Act 1986 by introducing SIVAs (Simplified IVA) have been withdrawn from the regulatory marketplace
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Substitutionary Atonement
Technically speaking, substitutionary atonement is the name given to a number of Christian models of the atonement that regard Jesus
Jesus
as dying as a substitute for others, 'instead of' them. It is arguably expressed in the Bible
Bible
in passages such as "He himself bore our sins in his body on the tree, that we might die to sin and live to righteousness",[1 Pet. 2:24] and "For Christ also died for sins once for all, the righteous for the unrighteous, that he might bring us to God."[1 Pet
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Lord's Prayer
The Lord's Prayer
Lord's Prayer
(also called the Our Father or Pater Noster, among other names) is a venerated Christian prayer
Christian prayer
that, according to the New Testament, Jesus
Jesus
taught as the way to pray.[1] Two versions of this prayer are recorded: the long form in the Gospel of Matthew
Gospel of Matthew
in the middle of the Sermon
Sermon
on the Mount, and the short form in the Gospel of Luke
Gospel of Luke
when "one of his disciples said to him, 'Lord, teach us to pray, as John taught his disciples.'"[2] The first three of the seven petitions in Matthew address God; the other four are related to human needs and concerns. The Matthew account alone includes the "Your will be done" and the "Rescue us from the evil one" (or "Deliver us from evil") petitions
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Insolvency Practitioner
In the United Kingdom, only an authorised or licensed Insolvency Practitioner (usually abbreviated to IP) may be appointed in relation to formal insolvency procedures. Quite often IPs have an accountancy background. A few active practitioners are lawyers, but it is not necessary to be qualified as either, as since 1986 there has been a direct entry route to the profession.Contents1 Insolvency is a regulated profession 2 Trade body 3 Procedures requiring an Insolvency Practitioner 4 See also 5 References 6 External links Insolvency is a regulated profession[edit] In the UK, only a licensed Insolvency Practitioner (referred to as IP) can be appointed in relation to formal insolvency procedures for individuals and businesses. Insolvency Practitioners are licensed to advise on, and undertake appointments in, all formal insolvency procedures
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Greece
Greece
Greece
(Greek: Ελλάδα), officially the Hellenic Republic (Ελληνική Δημοκρατία), historically also known as Hellas, is a country located in Southern Europe,[10] with a population of approximately 11 million as of 2016. Athens
Athens
is the nation's capital and largest city, followed by Thessaloniki. Greece
Greece
is located at the crossroads of Europe, Asia, and Africa. Situated on the southern tip of the Balkan Peninsula, it shares land borders with Albania
Albania
to the northwest, the Republic of Macedonia
Republic of Macedonia
and Bulgaria
Bulgaria
to the north, and Turkey
Turkey
to the northeast
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Latin) (de facto) "Out of many, one" "Annuit cœptis" (Latin) "H
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United Kingdom
The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
(UK) or Britain, is a sovereign country in western Europe
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Entity
An entity is something that exists as itself, as a subject or as an object, actually or potentially, concretely or abstractly, physically or not. It need not be of material existence. In particular, abstractions and legal fictions are usually regarded as entities. In general, there is also no presumption that an entity is animate, or present. The word is abstract in intention. It may refer, for example, to Bucephalus, the horse of Alexander; to a stone; to a cardinal number; to a language; or to ghosts or other spirits. The word entitative is the adjective form of the noun entity. Something that is entitative is considered in its own right.Contents1 In philosophy 2 In law 3 In politics 4 In medicine 5 See also 6 ReferencesIn philosophy[edit] Main article: Ontology Ontology
Ontology
is the study of being, existence and the recognition of entities
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Mortgage Loan
A mortgage loan, or simply mortgage, is used either by purchasers of real property to raise funds to buy real estate, or alternatively by existing property owners to raise funds for any purpose, while putting a lien on the property being mortgaged. The loan is "secured" on the borrower's property through a process known as mortgage origination. This means that a legal mechanism is put into place which allows the lender to take possession and sell the secured property ("foreclosure" or "repossession") to pay off the loan in the event the borrower defaults on the loan or otherwise fails to abide by its terms
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Promissory Note
A promissory note, sometimes referred to as a note payable, is a legal instrument (more particularly, a financial instrument and a debt instrument), in which one party (the maker or issuer) promises in writing to pay a determinate sum of money to the other (the payee), either at a fixed or determinable future time or on demand of the payee, under specific terms. If the promissory note is unconditional and readily saleable, it is called a negotiable instrument.[1] The term note payable is commonly used in accounting (as distinguished from accounts payable) or commonly as just a "note", it is internationally defined by the Convention providing a uniform law for bills of exchange and promissory notes, but regional variations exist. A banknote is frequently referred to as a promissory note, as it is made by a bank and payable to bearer on demand
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Bank
A bank is a financial institution that accepts deposits from the public and creates credit.[1] Lending
Lending
activities can be performed either directly or indirectly through capital markets. Due to their importance in the financial stability of a country, banks are highly regulated in most countries. Most nations have institutionalized a system known as fractional reserve banking under which banks hold liquid assets equal to only a portion of their current liabilities. In addition to other regulations intended to ensure liquidity, banks are generally subject to minimum capital requirements based on an international set of capital standards, known as the Basel Accords. Banking
Banking
in its modern sense evolved in the 14th century in the prosperous cities of Renaissance Italy
Renaissance Italy
but in many ways was a continuation of ideas and concepts of credit and lending that had their roots in the ancient world
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Credit Card Debt
Credit card debt is an example of unsecured consumer debt, accessed through credit cards. Debt results when a client of a credit card company purchases an item or service through the card system. Debt accumulates and increases via interest and penalties when the consumer does not pay the company for the money he or she has spent. The results of not paying this debt on time are that the company will charge a late payment penalty (generally in the US from $10 to $40) and report the late payment to credit rating agencies. Being late on a payment is sometimes referred to as being in "default". The late payment penalty itself increases the amount of debt the consumer has. When a consumer has been late on a payment, it is possible that other creditors, even creditors the consumer was not late in paying, may increase the interest rates the consumer is paying
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