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Death Deity
Deities associated with death take many different forms, depending on the specific culture and religion being referenced. Psychopomps, deities of the underworld, and resurrection deities are commonly called death deities in comparative religions texts. The term colloquially refers to deities that either collect or rule over the dead, rather than those deities who determine the time of death. However, all these types are included in this article. Many have incorporated a god of death into their mythology or religion. As death, along with birth, is among the major parts of human life, these deities may often be one of the most important deities of a religion. In some religions with a single powerful deity as the source of worship, the death deity is an antagonistic deity against which the primary deity struggles
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Yama
Yama
Yama
( listen (help·info)) or Yamarāja is a god of death, the south direction, and the underworld,[1] belonging to an early stratum of Rigvedic Hindu deities. In Sanskrit, his name can be interpreted to mean "twin".[2] In the Zend- Avesta
Avesta
of Zoroastrianism, he is called "Yima".[3] According to the Vishnu Purana, Yama
Yama
is the son of sun-god Surya[4] and Sandhya, the daughter of Vishvakarma. Yama
Yama
is the brother of Sraddhadeva Manu
Sraddhadeva Manu
and of his older sister Yami, which Horace Hayman Wilson indicates to mean the Yamuna.[5] According to the Vedas, Yama is said to have been the first mortal who died
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Chepi
Chepi is a ghost or fairy in the mythology of the Narragansett tribe of Native Americans from the Narragansett Bay
Narragansett Bay
region of Rhode Island, Connecticut, and eastern Massachusetts. Chepi is a spirit of the dead who shared knowledge with medicine people in dreams or visions. Chepi could be called upon by the "pawwaw" or medicine person, to destroy an enemy as an avenging entity. References[edit]Donald Ricky (1 January 1998). Encyclopedia of New Jersey Indians: Encyclopedia of Native Peoples. Somerset Publishers, Inc. p. 192. ISBN 978-0-403-09331-1. This article relating to a myth or legend from North America is a stub
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Haitian Vodou
Haitian Vodou[1][2][3] (/ˈvoʊduː/, French: [vodu], also written as Vaudou /ˈvoʊduː/;[4][5] known commonly as Voodoo[6][7] /ˈvuːduː/, sometimes as Vodun[8][9] /ˈvoʊduː/, Vodoun[8][10] /ˈvoʊduːn/, Vodu[6] /ˈvoʊduː/, or Vaudoux[6] /ˈvoʊduː/) is a syncretic[11] religion practiced chiefly in Haiti
Haiti
and the Haitian diaspora. Practitioners are called "vodouists" (French: vodouisants [voduizɑ̃]) or "servants of the spirits" (Haitian Creole: sèvitè).[12] Vodouists believe in a distant and unknowable Supreme Creator, Bondye (derived from the French term Bon
Bon
Dieu, meaning "good God")
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Baron Samedi
Baron Samedi
Baron Samedi
(French: Baron Saturday) also written Baron Samdi, Bawon Samedi, or Bawon Sanmdi, is one of the loa of Haitian Vodou. Samedi is a loa of the dead, along with Baron's numerous other incarnations Baron Cimetière, Baron La Croix, and Baron Kriminel. He is syncretized with Saint Martin de Porres[citation needed]. He is the head of the Guédé family of loa. His wife is the loa Maman Brigitte.Contents1 Portrayal 2 Connection to other loas 3 Activities 4 References 5 Bibliography 6 External linksPortrayal[edit] He is usually depicted with a top hat, black tail coat, dark glasses, and cotton plugs in the nostrils, as if to resemble a corpse dressed and prepared for burial in the Haitian style. He has a white, frequently skull-like face (or actually has a skull for a face), and speaks in a nasally voice
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Camazotz
In Maya mythology, Camazotz
Camazotz
(/kɑːməˈsɒts/ from Mayan /kämäˈsots/) (alternate spellings Cama-Zotz, Sotz, Zotz) was a bat god. Camazotz
Camazotz
means "death bat" in the K'iche' language. In Mesoamerica
Mesoamerica
the bat was associated with night, death, and sacrifice.[1]Contents1 Etymology 2 Mythology 3 See also 4 Notes 5 ReferencesEtymology[edit] Camazotz
Camazotz
is formed from the K'iche' words kame, meaning "death", and sotz', meaning "bat".[2] Mythology[edit] In the Popol Vuh, Camazotz
Camazotz
are the bat-like monsters encountered by the Maya Hero Twins
Maya Hero Twins
Hunahpu and Xbalanque during their trials in the underworld of Xibalba. The twins had to spend the night in the House of Bats where they squeezed themselves into their own blowguns in order to defend themselves from the circling bats
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Maya Mythology
Maya mythology
Maya mythology
is part of Mesoamerican mythology and comprises all of the Maya tales in which personified forces of nature, deities, and the heroes interacting with these play the main roles. Other parts of Maya oral tradition (such as animal tales and many moralising stories) do not properly belong to the domain of mythology, but rather to legend and folk tale.Contents1 Sources 2 Important mythical themes2.1 Creation and end of the world 2.2 The Corn Men 2.3 Actions of the heroes: Arranging the world 2.4 Marriage with the Earth 2.5 Origin of Sun and Moon3 Reconstructing pre-Spanish mythology 4 See also 5 Notes 6 Bibliography and references 7 External linksSources[edit] The oldest written Maya myths date from the 16th century and are found in historical sources from the Guatemalan Highlands
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El Tío
El Tío
El Tío
(The Uncle), is believed in Cerro Rico, Potosí, Bolivia
Bolivia
as the "Lord of the Underworld'. There are many statues of this devil-like spirit in the mines of Cerro Rico. El Tío
El Tío
rules over the mines, simultaneously offering protection and destruction. Some figures are really in the shape of a goat.[1] Miners bring offerings such as cigarettes, coca leaves, and alcohol for the statues[2][3] and believe that if El Tío
El Tío
is not fed, he will take matters into his own hands. Villagers of Potosi ritually slaughter a llama and smear its blood on the entrance to the mines.[1] The miners of Cerro Rico
Cerro Rico
are Catholics and they believe in both Christ and El Tío. However, worship of El Tío
El Tío
is condemned strongly by the Catholic
Catholic
Church
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Cerro Rico
Cerro Rico
Cerro Rico
(Spanish for "rich mountain"), Cerro Potosí[1] ("Potosí mountain") or Sumaq Urqu[2] (Quechua sumaq beautiful, good, pleasant, urqu mountain,[3] "beautiful (good or pleasant) mountain") is a mountain in the Andes
Andes
near the Bolivian city of Potosí. Cerro Rico was famous for providing vast quantities of silver for Spain during the period of the New World
New World
Spanish Empire. The mountain, which is popularly conceived of as being "made of" silver ore, caused the city of Potosí
Potosí
to become one of the largest cities in the New World. After 1800, the silver mines were depleted, making tin the main product. This eventually led to a slow economic decline
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Bolivia
Coordinates: 16°42′43″S 64°39′58″W / 16.712°S 64.666°W / -16.712; -64.666Plurinational State of BoliviaEstado Plurinacional de Bolivia  (Spanish) Tetã Hetãvoregua Volívia  (Guaraní) Buliwya Mamallaqta  (Quechua) Wuliwya Suyu  (Aymara)FlagCoat of armsMotto: "La Unión es la Fuerza" (Spanish) "Unity is Strength"[1]Anthem: Himno Nacional de Bolivia  (Spanish)Location of  Bolivia  (dark green) in South America  (grey)Capital Sucre
Sucre
<

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Anguta
Anguta is the father of the sea goddess Sedna in Inuit mythology. In certain myths of the Greenland Inuit Anguta (also called "His Father" or Anigut) is considered the creator-god and is the supreme being among of the Inuit people. In other myths, Anguta is merely a mortal widower. His name, meaning "man with something to cut," refers to his mutilating of his daughter which ultimately resulted in her godhood, an act he carried out in both myths. Anguta is a psychopomp, ferrying souls from the land of the living to the underworld, called Adlivun, where his daughter rules. Those souls must then sleep there for a year before they go to Qudlivun (those above us) on the Moon where they will enjoy eternal bliss
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Inuit Mythology
WikiProjectIndigenous North AmericansFirst NationsCommons WiktionaryInuitCommons WiktionaryMétisCommons Wiktionaryv t e Inuit
Inuit
religion is the shared spiritual beliefs and practices of Inuit, an indigenous people from Alaska, Canada, and Greenland. Their religion shares many similarities with religions of other North Polar peoples. Traditional Inuit
Inuit
religious practices include animism and shamanism, in which spiritual healers mediate with spirits. [1] Today many Inuit
Inuit
follow Christianity, but traditional Inuit spirituality continues as part of a living, oral tradition and part of contemporary Inuit
Inuit
society. Inuit
Inuit
who balance indigenous and Christian theology practice religious syncretism.[2] Inuit
Inuit
cosmology provides a narrative about the world and the place of people within it
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Aipaloovik
In Inuit mythology, Aipaloovik is an evil sea god associated with death and destruction.[1] He is considered the opposite of Anguta.[2] He is a danger to all fishermen.[3] References[edit]^ Abel, Ernest L. (2009-03-20). Death Gods: An Encyclopedia of the Rulers, Evil Spirits, and Geographies of the Dead. ABC-CLIO. ISBN 9780313357138.  ^ The Complete Idiot's Guide to World Mythology.  ^ Coulter, Charles Russell; Turner, Patricia (2013-07-04). Encyclopedia of Ancient Deities
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Igbo Mythology
Lua error in Module:Navbar at line 66: Tried to write global div. Odinani
Odinani
(Igbo: ọ̀dị̀nànị̀) comprises the traditional religious practices and cultural beliefs of the Igbo people
Igbo people
of southern Nigeria.[1] Odinani
Odinani
has monotheistic and panentheistic attributes, having a single God
God
as the source of all things. Although a pantheon of spirits exists, these are lesser spirits prevalent in Odinani
Odinani
expressly serving as elements of Chineke (or Chukwu), the supreme being or high god.[2] Chineke is a compound word encompassing the concept of chí is the creator (nà) is a verb meaning 'that' while ékè means create. Chineke therefore means the Creator or the God
God
that created all things
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Pana
In Inuit mythology, Pana was the god who cared for souls in the underworld (Adlivun) before they were reincarnated.[1][unreliable source?] References[edit]^ G. Rodney Avant (31 January 2005). A Mythological Reference. AuthorHouse. pp. 48–. ISBN 978-1-4184-9278-6
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Baron Cimetiere
Baron Cimitière (Baron Cemetery) is one of the Guédé, a spirit of the dead, along with Baron Samedi
Baron Samedi
and Baron La Croix in Vodou. He is said to be the male guardian of the cemetery, protecting its graves.[1] His horses wear a tuxedo or tails and a top hat. They have expensive tastes, smoking cigars and drinking wine or fine liquor. They are just as crass as the other Guede, but ape polite manners and upper-class airs while doing so. Other manifestations[edit] Brave Guede is the doorman between the world of the living and the afterlife, guardian of the cemetery gate
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