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Dear John (U.S. TV Series)
Dear John is an American sitcom that aired on NBC
NBC
from 1988 to 1992. The series was originally based on the British sitcom of the same name. Dear John was retitled Dear John USA when it was shown in the UK. During its four-season run, the series was bounced to and from various time periods on Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, and Saturday nights. The series moved from its post- Cheers
Cheers
slot on Thursdays to a post- Night Court
Night Court
slot on Wednesdays in 1990.Contents1 Synopsis 2 Episodes 3 Reception3.1 Critics 3.2 Ratings 3.3 Awards4 References 5 External linksSynopsis[edit] Dear John is set in New York City. Judd Hirsch
Judd Hirsch
stars as John Lacey, a teacher at a preparatory school in Manhattan. After ten years of marriage, one day he returns home and finds a Dear John letter: his wife, Wendy, is leaving him for his best friend
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Nielsen Ratings
Nielsen ratings are the audience measurement systems operated by Nielsen Media Research
Nielsen Media Research
that seek to determine the audience size and composition of television programming in the United States. Nielsen Media Research
Nielsen Media Research
was founded by Arthur C. Nielsen, a market analyst whose career had begun in the 1920s with brand advertising analysis and had expanded into radio market analysis during the 1930s, culminating in Nielsen ratings of radio programming, which was meant to provide statistics as to the markets of radio shows. The first Nielsen ratings for radio programs were released the first week of December 1947
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Alcoholics Anonymous
Alcoholics Anonymous
Alcoholics Anonymous
(AA) is an international mutual aid fellowship[1] founded in 1935 by Bill Wilson and Dr. Bob Smith in Akron, Ohio. AA's stated "primary purpose" is to "stay sober and help other alcoholics achieve sobriety".[1][2][3] With other early members, Bill Wilson and Bob Smith developed AA's Twelve Step program of spiritual and character development. AA's initial Twelve Traditions were introduced in 1946 to help the fellowship be stable and unified while disengaged from "outside issues" and influences. The Traditions recommend that members remain anonymous in public media, altruistically help other alcoholics, and that AA groups avoid official affiliations with other organizations. They also advise against dogma and coercive hierarchies
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Support Group
In a support group, members provide each other with various types of help, usually nonprofessional and nonmaterial, for a particular shared, usually burdensome, characteristic. Members with the same issues can come together for sharing coping strategies, to feel more empowered and for a sense of community. The help may take the form of providing and evaluating relevant information, relating personal experiences, listening to and accepting others' experiences, providing sympathetic understanding and establishing social networks
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Toll House
A tollhouse or toll house is a building with accommodation for a toll collector, beside a tollgate on a toll road or canal.Contents1 History 2 See also 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Many tollhouses were built by turnpike trusts in England, Wales and Scotland during the 18th and early 19th centuries. Those built in the early 19th century often had a distinctive bay front to give the pikeman a clear view of the road and to provide a display area for the tollboard.[2] In 1840, according to the Turnpike Returns in Parliamentary Papers, there were over 5,000 tollhouses operating in England. These were sold off in the 1880s when the turnpikes were closed. Many were demolished but several hundred have survived as domestic houses, with distinctive features of the old tollhouse still visible. Canal
Canal
toll houses were built in very similar style to those on turnpikes. They are sited at major canal locks or at junctions
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IMDb
IMDb, also known as Internet Movie Database, is an online database of information related to world films, television programs, home videos and video games, and internet streams, including cast, production crew, personnel and fictional character biographies, plot summaries, trivia, and fan reviews and ratings. An additional fan feature, message boards, was abandoned in February, 2017. The database is owned and operated by IMDb.com, Inc., a subsidiary of Amazon. As of December 2017[update], IMDb
IMDb
has approximately 4.7 million titles (including episodes) and 8.3 million personalities in its database,[2] as well as 83 million registered users. The movie and talent pages of IMDb
IMDb
are accessible to all internet users, but a registration process is necessary to contribute information to the site. Most data in the database is provided by volunteer contributors
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Situation Comedy
A sit-com or sitcom, a portmanteau of the full term "situation comedy", is a genre of comedy centered on a fixed set of characters who carry over from episode to episode. Sitcoms can be contrasted with sketch comedy, where a troupe may use new characters in each sketch, and stand-up comedy, where a comedian tells jokes and stories to an audience. Sitcoms originated in radio, but today are found mostly on television as one of its dominant narrative forms. This form can also include mockumentaries. A situation comedy television program may be recorded in front of a studio audience, depending on the program's production format. The effect of a live studio audience can be imitated or enhanced by the use of a laugh track. During filming productions, the laugh track is usually prerecorded.[1]Contents1 History 2 By country2.1 Australia 2.2 Canada 2.3 India 2.4 Mexico 2.5 New Zealand 2.6 Russia 2.7 United Kingdom 2.8 United States2.8.1 Sitcoms on U.S. radio 2.8.2 Sitcoms on U.S
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John Leonard (critic)
John Leonard (February 25, 1939 – November 5, 2008)[1] was an American literary, television, film, and cultural critic.Contents1 Biography 2 Effect on the literary world 3 Selected works 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksBiography[edit] John Leonard grew up in Washington, D.C., Jackson Heights, Queens, and Long Beach, California, where he graduated from Woodrow Wilson High School. Raised by a single mother, Ruth Smith, he made his way to Harvard University, where he immersed himself in the school newspaper, The Harvard Crimson, only to drop out in the spring of his second year. He then attended the University of California at Berkeley. A political leftist, Leonard had an unlikely early patron in conservative leader William F. Buckley, who gave him his first job in journalism at National Review
National Review
magazine in 1959. There, he worked alongside such young talents as Joan Didion, Garry Wills, Renata Adler and Arlene Croce
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New York Magazine
New York is an American biweekly magazine concerned with life, culture, politics, and style generally, and with a particular emphasis on New York City
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The Complete Directory To Prime Time Network And Cable TV Shows 1946–Present
The Complete Directory to Prime Time Network and Cable TV Shows, 1946–Present is a trade paperback reference work by the American television researchers Tim Brooks and Earle Marsh, first published by Ballantine Books
Ballantine Books
in 1979. That first edition won a 1980 U.S. National Book Award in the one-year category General Reference (paperback).[1][a] The ninth edition came out in 2007 (ISBN 978-0-345-49773-4). The title of early editions did not include the words "and cable". In 2007, co-author Tim Brooks stated that the ninth edition may be the last one released of the book.[2] Features[edit] According to the authors, the book is an attempt to list all commercially broadcast network series ever shown in the evening or nighttime hours (defined as 6:00 P.M. Eastern Standard Time or later) in the United States (i.e., prime time)
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Rego Park, Queens
Rego Park is a neighborhood in the borough of Queens
Queens
in New York City. Rego Park is bordered to the north by Elmhurst and Corona, the east and south by Forest Hills and the west by Middle Village. Rego Park's boundaries include Queens
Queens
Boulevard, the Long Island Expressway, Woodhaven Boulevard, and Yellowstone Boulevard
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Prime Time
The prime time or the peak time is the block of broadcast programming taking place during the middle of the evening for television programming. The term prime time is often defined in terms of a fixed time period – for example (in the United States of America), from 7:00 to 10:00 (Central and Mountain Time) or 8:00 to 11:00 (Eastern and Pacific Time).Contents1 Asia1.1 Bangladesh 1.2 China1.2.1 Hong Kong and Macau1.3 India 1.4 Indonesia 1.5 Iraq 1.6 Japan 1.7 Malaysia 1.8 Philippines 1.9 Singapore 1.10 South Korea 1.11 Taiwan 1.12 Thailand 1.13 Vietnam2 Europe2.1 Bosnia and Herzegovina 2.2 Croatia 2.3 Denmark 2.4 Finland 2.5 France 2.6 Georgia 2.7 Germany 2.8 Greece 2.9 Hungary 2.10 Iceland 2.11 Italy 2.12 Netherlands 2.13 Norway 2.14 Poland 2.15 Russia 2.16 Slovakia 2.17 Slovenia 2.18 Spain 2.19 Sweden 2.20 United Kingdom3 Latin America3.1 Argentina 3.2 Chile4 North America4.1 Prime time
Prime time
in the context of U.S
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Time Slot
Broadcast
Broadcast
programming is the practice of organizing and/or ordering of broadcast media programs (Internet, television, radio, etc. ) in a daily, weekly, monthly, quarterly or season-long schedule. Modern broadcasters use broadcast automation to regularly change the scheduling of their programs to build an audience for a new show, retain that audience, or compete with other broadcasters' programs. In the United Kingdom, this is known as TV listings. Television
Television
scheduling strategies are employed to give programs the best possible chance of attracting and retaining an audience
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Paramount Domestic Television
Paramount Domestic Television
Television
(PDT) was the television distribution arm of American television production company Paramount Television, once the TV arm of Paramount Pictures
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Broadcast Syndication
Broadcasting
Broadcasting
syndication is the license to broadcast television programs and radio programs by multiple television stations and radio stations, without going through a broadcast network. It is common in the United States where broadcast programming is scheduled by television networks with local independent affiliates. Syndication is less of a practice in the rest of the world, as most countries have centralized networks or television stations without local affiliates; although less common, shows can be syndicated internationally
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
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