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Dean Potter
Dean S. Potter (April 14, 1972 – May 16, 2015) was an American free climber, alpinist, BASE jumper, BASEliner, and highliner.[2] He was noted for hard first ascents, free solo ascents, speed ascents, and enchainments in Yosemite National Park
Yosemite National Park
and Patagonia. Potter died in a wingsuit flying accident in Yosemite National Park.[3]Contents1 Early life 2 Free climbing 3 Speed climbing 4 Highlining and BASE jumping 5 Delicate Arch
Delicate Arch
climb 6 Death 7 Notable ascents 8 References 9 External linksEarly life[edit] Dean Potter
Dean Potter
was born in 1972[4][1] to an Army officer in a military hospital at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas[5] and grew up in New Hampshire. He taught himself to climb when he was in 10th grade in southern New Hampshire
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Hearing Dog
A hearing dog is a type of assistance dog specifically selected and trained to assist people who are deaf or hard of hearing by alerting their handler to important sounds, such as doorbells, smoke alarms, ringing telephones, or alarm clocks. They may also work outside the home, alerting to such sounds such as sirens, forklifts and a person calling the handler's name.Contents1 Training 2 Accessibility 3 See also 4 ReferencesTraining[edit] Dogs that may become hearing dogs are tested for proper temperament, sound reactivity, and willingness to work. After passing initial screenings, they are trained in basic obedience and exposed to things they will face in public such as elevators, shopping carts, and different types of people. Only after that period of socializing are they trained in sound alerting. Hearing dogs may be trained professionally in as little as three months, though many are trained for closer to a year
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Vehicle Registration Plates Of Utah
The U.S. state of Utah first required its residents to register their motor vehicles in 1909. Registrants had to provide their own license plates for display until 1915, when the state began to supply plates.[1] Plates are currently issued by the Utah State Tax Commission Division of Motor Vehicles (DMV).Contents1 Passenger baseplates1.1 1915 to 1967 1.2 1968 to present2 Non-passenger types 3 Optional plates3.1 Discontinued plates4 References 5 External linksPassenger baseplates[edit] 1915 to 1967[edit] In 1956, the U.S
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The New York Times
The New York Times
The New York Times
(sometimes abbreviated as The NYT or The Times) is an American newspaper based in New York City
New York City
with worldwide influence and readership.[6][7][8] Founded in 1851, the paper has won 122 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other newspaper.[9][10] As of September 2016, it had the largest combined print-and-digital circulation of any daily newspaper in the United States.[11] The New York Times is ranked 18th in the world by circulation. The paper is owned by The New York Times
The New York Times
Company, which is publicly traded but primarily controlled by the Ochs-Sulzberger family through a dual-class share structure.[12] It has been owned by the family since 1896; A.G
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Fort Leavenworth
Fort Leavenworth
Fort Leavenworth
is a United States Army
United States Army
installation located in Leavenworth County, Kansas, immediately north of the city of Leavenworth, in the northeast part of the state. Built in 1827, it is the oldest active United States Army
United States Army
post west of Washington, DC, and the oldest permanent settlement in Kansas.[1] Fort Leavenworth
Fort Leavenworth
has been historically known as the "Intellectual Center of the Army."[2] Fort Leavenworth
Fort Leavenworth
was also the base of African-American soldiers of the U.S. 10th Cavalry Regiment of the United States Army, formed on 21 September 1866 at Fort Leavenworth
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Viral Video
A viral video[1][2] is a video that becomes popular through a viral process of Internet sharing, typically through video sharing websites, social media and email.[3][4] Viral videos often contain humorous content and include televised comedy sketches, such as The Lonely Island's "Lazy Sunday" and "Dick in a Box", Numa Numa[5][6] videos, The Evolution of Dance,[5] Chocolate Rain[7] on YouTube; and web-only productions such as I Got a Crush..
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Animal Rights
Animal
Animal
rights is the idea in which some, or all, non-human animals are entitled to the possession of their own lives and that their most basic interests—such as the need to avoid suffering—should be afforded the same consideration as similar interests of human beings.[2] Advocates oppose the assignment of moral value and fundamental protections on the basis of species membership alone—an idea known since 1970 as speciesism, when the term was coined by Richard D. Ryder—arguing that it is a prejudice as irrational as any other.[3] They maintain that animals should no longer be v
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Patagonia (clothing)
Coordinates: 34°16′47″N 119°18′14″W / 34.2798°N 119.3040°W / 34.2798; -119.3040 Patagonia, Inc. is an American clothing company that sells outdoor clothing marketed as sustainable. The company was founded by Yvon Chouinard in 1973, and is based in Ventura, California.[1] Its logo is the skyline of Cerro Fitz Roy in Patagonia.Contents1 History 2 Activism2.1 Environmental 2.2 Politics and land preservation3 Materials3.1 Down 3.2 Wool4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Yvon Chouinard, an accredited rock climber,[2] began selling hand forged mountain climbing gear in 1957 through his company Chouinard Equipment
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Totem Pole (Monument Valley)
A totem (Ojibwe doodem) is a spirit being, sacred object, or symbol that serves as an emblem of a group of people, such as a family, clan, lineage, or tribe. While the term totem is Ojibwe, belief in tutelary spirits and deities is not limited to indigenous peoples of the Americas but common to a number of cultures worldwide
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Monument Valley
Monument Valley
Monument Valley
(Navajo: Tsé Biiʼ Ndzisgaii, pronounced [tsʰépìːʔntsɪ̀skɑ̀ìː], meaning valley of the rocks) is a region of the Colorado Plateau
Colorado Plateau
characterized by a cluster of vast sandstone buttes, the largest reaching 1,000 ft (300 m) above the valley floor.[1] It is located on the Arizona– Utah
Utah
border (around 36°59′N 110°6′W / 36.983°N 110.100°W / 36.983; -110.100Coordinates: 36°59′N 110°6′W / 36.983°N 110.100°W / 36.983; -110.100), near the Four Corners area. The valley lies within the territory of the Navajo Nation Reservation and is accessible from U.S. Highway 163. Monument Valley
Monument Valley
has been featured in many forms of media since the 1930s
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Navajo People
The Navajo
Navajo
(/næv.ə.hoʊ/; British English: Navaho, Navajo: Diné or Naabeehó) are a Native American people of the Southwestern United States. The Navajo people
Navajo people
are politically divided between two federally recognized tribes, the Navajo Nation
Navajo Nation
and the Colorado River Indian Tribes. At more than 300,000 enrolled tribal members as of 2015[update][1][2], the Navajo Nation
Navajo Nation
is the second largest federally recognized tribe in the U.S. (the Cherokee Nation
Cherokee Nation
being the largest), and has the largest reservation in the country. The reservation straddles the Four Corners region and covers more than 27,000 square miles of land in Arizona, Utah, and New Mexico
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Salt Lake Tribune
The Salt Lake Tribune
The Salt Lake Tribune
is a daily newspaper published in the city of Salt Lake City, Utah, with the largest weekday circulation but second largest Sunday circulation behind the Deseret News. The Tribune, often referred to as just "the Trib," is owned by Paul Huntsman and printed through a joint operating agreement with the Deseret News
Deseret News
through the Newspaper
Newspaper
Agency Corporation. For almost 100 years it was a family-owned newspaper held by the heirs of U.S. Senator Thomas Kearns. After Kearns died in 1918 the company was controlled by his widow, Jennie Judge Kearns, and son, Thomas F. Kearns. The newspaper's longtime publisher was John F
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Lost Arrow Spire
The Lost Arrow Spire is a detached pillar in Yosemite Valley, California, located immediately adjacent to Upper Yosemite Falls. The structure includes the Lost Arrow Spire Chimney route which is recognized in the historic climbing text Fifty Classic Climbs of North America.[2] The last two pitches of Lost Arrow Spire Chimney are called the Lost Arrow Spire Tip and completes the detached portion of the spire. The Tip route is often reached by rappelling into an area known as The Notch. Once the route is completed climbers will often return to the main wall via a dramatic and famous Tyrolean traverse. The spire was originally summited by lassoing the summit from the main wall and then Ax Nelson prusiked the lassoed line to the peak and was followed by Jack Arnold. While Steve Roper called this "one of the greatest rope stunts ever pulled off in climbing history" many climbers did not recognize this "rope trick" as a true ascent
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Cease And Desist
A cease and desist letter is a document sent to an individual or business to stop purportedly illegal activity ("cease") and not to restart it ("desist"). The letter may warn that if the recipient does not discontinue specified conduct, or take certain actions, by deadlines set in the letter, that party may be sued.[1][2] When issued by a public authority, a cease and desist letter, being "a warning of impending judicial enforcement",[3] is most appropriately called a "cease and desist order". Although cease and desist letters are not exclusively used in the area of intellectual property, such letters "are frequently utilized in disputes concerning intellectual property and represent an important feature of the intellectual property law landscape". The holder of an intellectual property right such as a copyrighted work, a trademark, or a patent, may send the cease and desist letter to inform a third party "of the right holders' rights, identity, and intentions to enforce the rights"
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U.s. National Park
The United States
United States
has 60 protected areas known as national parks[1] that are operated by the National Park Service, an agency of the Department of the Interior. National parks must be established by an act of the United States
United States
Congress. A bill creating the first national park, Yellowstone, was signed into law by President Ulysses S. Grant in 1872, followed by Mackinac National Park
Mackinac National Park
in 1875 (decommissioned in 1895), and then Rock Creek Park
Rock Creek Park
(later merged into National Capital Parks), Sequoia and Yosemite in 1890
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Moab
Moab
Moab
(/ˈmoʊæb/; Moabite: 𐤌𐤀𐤁‬ mʾb; Arabic: مؤاب‎ muʾāb; Hebrew: מוֹאָב‬, Modern Mō'av, Tiberian Mōʾôḇ; Ancient Greek: Μωάβ Mōáb; Assyrian Mu'aba, Ma'ba, Ma'ab; Egyptian Mu'ab) is the historical name for a mountainous tract of land in Jordan. The land lies alongside much of the eastern shore of the Dead Sea
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