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David Kimhi
David Kimhi
David Kimhi
(Hebrew: דוד קמחי‎, also Kimchi or Qimḥi) (1160–1235), also known by the Hebrew acronym as the RaDaK (רד"ק) ( Rabbi
Rabbi
David Kimhi), was a medieval rabbi, biblical commentator, philosopher, and grammarian. Kimhi was born in Narbonne, Provence, the youngest son of Rabbi
Rabbi
Joseph Kimhi and the brother of Rabbi
Rabbi
Moses Kimhi, both also biblical commentators and grammarians.Contents1 Early life 2 Scholarship 3 References 4 External linksEarly life[edit] His father died while David was still as a child, and Kimhi was raised by his brother Moses.[1] Later, he supported himself by teaching Talmud to the young. He was well versed in the whole range of Hebrew literature, and became the most illustrious representative of his name
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Ethics
Ethics
Ethics
or moral philosophy is a branch of philosophy that involves systematizing, defending, and recommending concepts of right and wrong conduct.[1] The term ethics derives from Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
ἠθικός (ethikos), from ἦθος (ethos), meaning 'habit, custom'. The branch of philosophy axiology comprises the sub-branches of ethics and aesthetics, each concerned with values.[2] Ethics
Ethics
seeks to resolve questions of human morality by defining concepts such as good and evil, right and wrong, virtue and vice, justice and crime
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Rashi
Shlomo Yitzchaki (Hebrew: רבי שלמה יצחקי‬‎; Latin: Salomon Isaacides; French: Salomon de Troyes, 22 February 1040 – 13 July 1105), today generally known by the acronym Rashi
Rashi
(Hebrew: רש"י‬, RAbbi SHlomo Itzhaki), was a medieval French rabbi and author of a comprehensive commentary on the Talmud
Talmud
and commentary on the Tanakh. Acclaimed for his ability to present the basic meaning of the text in a concise and lucid fashion, Rashi
Rashi
appeals to both learned scholars and beginner students, and his works remain a centerpiece of contemporary Jewish study
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Targum
The targumim (singular: "targum", Hebrew: תרגום‬) were spoken paraphrases, explanations and expansions of the Jewish scriptures (also called the Tanakh) that a rabbi would give in the common language of the listeners, which was then often Aramaic. That had become necessary near the end of the 1st century BCE, as the common language was in transition and Hebrew was used for little more than schooling and worship.[1] The noun "Targum" is derived from the early semitic quadriliteral root trgm, and the Akkadian term targummanu refers to "translator, interpreter".[2] It occurs in the Hebrew Bible in Ezra 4:7 "..
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Aramaic Language
Aramaic[2] (אַרָמָיָא Arāmāyā, Classical Syriac: ܐܪܡܝܐ‎, Arabic: آرامية‎) is a language or group of languages belonging to the Semitic subfamily of the Afroasiatic language family. More specifically, it is part of the Northwest Semitic group, which also includes the Canaanite languages such as Hebrew and Phoenician. The Aramaic alphabet
Aramaic alphabet
was widely adopted for other languages and is ancestral to the Hebrew, Syriac and Arabic alphabets. During its approximately 3,100 years of written history,[3] Aramaic has served variously as a language of administration of empires and as a language of divine worship, religious study and as the spoken tongue of a number of Semitic peoples from the Near East. Historically, Aramaic was the language of Aramean tribes, a Semitic people of the region around between the Levant
Levant
and the northern Euphrates
Euphrates
valley
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Jonathan Ben Uzziel
Jonathan ben Uzziel
Jonathan ben Uzziel
(Hebrew: יונתן בן עוזיאל‬) was one of the 80 tannaim who studied under Hillel the Elder
Hillel the Elder
during the time of Roman-ruled Judea. He is the author of Targum Jonathan and a book of kabbalah known as Megadnim. Jonathan ben Uzziel
Jonathan ben Uzziel
is mentioned in the Talmud
Talmud
(Sukkah 28a, Bava Batra 133b). According to Zev Vilnai, Rabbi Shmuel ben Shimshon wrote about the tomb in 1210: "There is a large tree next to it, and the Ishmaelites [Arabs] bring oil and light a candle in his honor and make vows in his honor." An illustration of Yonatan ben Uzziel's tomb appears in "Ancestry of fathers and prophets" (Hebrew: יחוס אבות ונביאים), a book printed in 1537. The tomb of ben Uzziel is located in Amuka, Galilee
Galilee
near Safed, Israel
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Garden Of Eden
The Garden of Eden
Garden of Eden
(Hebrew גַּן עֵדֶן, Gan ʿEḏen) or (often) Paradise, is the biblical "garden of God", described most notably in the Book of Genesis
Book of Genesis
chapters 2 and 3, and also in the Book of Ezekiel.[2][3] Genesis 13:10 refers to the "garden of God" (not called Eden by name),[4] and the "trees of the garden" are mentioned in Ezekiel
Ezekiel
31.[5] The Book of Zechariah
Book of Zechariah
and the Book of Psalms
Book of Psalms
also refer to trees and water in relation to the temple without explicitly mentioning Eden.[6] Traditionally, scholars favored deriving the name "Eden" from the Akkadian
Akkadian
edinnu, derived from a Sumerian word edin meaning "plain" or "steppe"
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Cain And Abel
In the biblical Book of Genesis, Cain[a] and Abel[b] are the first two sons of Adam
Adam
and Eve.[1] Cain, the firstborn, was a farmer, and his brother Abel
Abel
was a shepherd. The brothers made sacrifices to God, each of his own produce, but God favored Abel's sacrifice instead of Cain's. Cain
Cain
then murdered Abel, whereupon God punished Cain
Cain
to a life of wandering. Cain
Cain
then dwelt in the land of Nod (נוֹד‬, "wandering"), where he built a city and fathered the line of descendants beginning with Enoch. The narrative never explicitly states Cain's motive for murdering his brother, nor God's reason for rejecting Cain's sacrifice, nor details on the identity of Cain's wife
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Gloss (margin Text)
A gloss (from Latin glossa; from Greek γλῶσσα (glóssa), meaning 'language') is a brief notation, especially a marginal one or an interlinear one, of the meaning of a word or wording in a text. It may be in the language of the text, or in the reader's language if that is different. A collection of glosses is a glossary. A collection of medieval legal glosses, made by glossators, is called an apparatus. The compilation of glosses into glossaries was the beginning of lexicography, and the glossaries so compiled were in fact the first dictionaries. In modern times a glossary, as opposed to a dictionary, is typically found in a text as an appendix of specialized terms that the typical reader may find unfamiliar. Also, satirical explanations of words and events are called glosses
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Book Of Ezekiel
The Book
Book
of Ezekiel
Ezekiel
is the third of the Latter Prophets in the Tanakh and one of the major prophetic books in the Old Testament, following Isaiah and Jeremiah.[1] According to the book itself, it records six visions of the prophet Ezekiel, exiled in Babylon, during the 22 years 593–571 BC, although it is the product of a long and complex history and does not necessarily preserve the very words of the prophet.[2] The visions, and the book, are structured around three themes: (1) Judgment on Israel
Israel
(chapters 1–24); (2) Judgment on the nations (chapters 25–32); and (3) Future blessings for Israel
Israel
(chapters 33–48).[3] Its themes include the concepts of the presence of God, purity, Israel
Israel
as a divine community, and individual responsibility to God
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Science
Science
Science
(from Latin scientia, meaning "knowledge")[2][3]:58 is a systematic enterprise that builds and organizes knowledge in the form of testable explanations and predictions about the universe.[a] Contemporary science is typically subdivided into the natural sciences which study the material world, the social sciences which study people and societies, and the formal sciences like mathematics
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Geography
Geography
Geography
(from Greek γεωγραφία, geographia, literally "earth description"[1]) is a field of science devoted to the study of the lands, the features, the inhabitants, and the phenomena of Earth.[2] The first person to use the word "γεωγραφία" was Eratosthenes (276–194 BC).[3] Geography
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Abraham Ibn Ezra
Abraham ben Meir Ibn Ezra
Ezra
(Hebrew: אַבְרָהָם אִבְּן עֶזְרָא or ראב"ע‬‎; Arabic: ابن عزرا‎; also known as Abenezra or Aben Ezra, 1089 Tudela, Navarre[1]–c.1167) was one of the most distinguished Jewish biblical commentators and philosophers of the Middle Ages. For long it had been assumed that he died at Calahorra.[2]Contents1 Biography 2 Works 3 Influence on biblical criticism and philosophy of religion3.1 Biblical commentaries 3.2 Hebrew grammar 3.3 Smaller works – partly grammatical, partly exegetical 3.4 Religious philosophy 3.5 Mathematics and astronomy 3.6 Astrology 3.7 Poetry4 Legacy 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksBiography[edit] Abraham Ibn Ezra
Ezra
was born in Tudela, in the present-day Spanish province of Navarre, when the town was under the Muslim
Muslim
rule of the emirs of Zaragoza.[3] Later he lived in Córdoba
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Maimonides
30 March[1] or 6 April[2] 1135 Possibly born 28 March[3] or 4 April[4] 1138 Córdoba, Almoravid Empire
Almoravid Empire
(present-day Spain)Died 12 December 1204 (aged 69) Fostat, Ayyubid Sultanate
Ayyubid Sultanate
(present-day Eg
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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