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David Jennings (tutor)
David Jennings (1691–1762) was an English Dissenting minister and tutor, known also as the author of Jewish Antiquities.Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 Family 4 ReferencesLife[edit] He was the younger son of the ejected minister John Jennings (1634–1701), whose ministry to the independent congregation at Kibworth was continued by his elder brother John. David passed through the Kibworth grammar school, and studied for the ministry (1709–14) at the Fund Academy in Moorfields, under Isaac Chauncy and his successors, Thomas Ridgley, D.D., and John Eames. His first sermon was at Battersea, 23 May 1714. In March 1715 he was chosen evening lecturer at Rotherhithe; in June 1716 he became assistant to John Foxon at Girdlers' Hall, Basinghall Street; on 19 May 1718 he was called to succeed Thomas Simmons as pastor of the independent congregation, Wapping New Stairs
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Kibworth
Kibworth /ˈkɪbwərθ/ is an area of the Harborough
Harborough
district of Leicestershire, England, that contains two civil parishes—the villages of Kibworth Beauchamp /ˈbiːtʃəm/ and Kibworth Harcourt /ˈhɑːrkɔːrt/. According to the 2011 census, Kibworth Beauchamp had a population of 5,433 and Kibworth Harcourt of 990. The two villages are split by the A6
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Alexander Gordon (Unitarian)
Alexander Gordon (9 June 1841 – 21 February 1931) was an English Unitarian minister and religious historian. A prolific contributor to the Dictionary of National Biography, he wrote for it well over 700 articles dealing mainly with nonconformists.[1] Life[edit] Gordon was born in Coventry, the son of John Gordon, a Unitarian minister. He was an undergraduate at the University of Edinburgh
University of Edinburgh
from 1856 to 1859, then trained at Manchester New College
Manchester New College
in London, and studied under Ignaz von Döllinger
Ignaz von Döllinger
in Munich
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Cotton Mather
Cotton Mather, FRS (February 12, 1663 – February 13, 1728; A.B. 1678, Harvard College; A.M. 1681, honorary doctorate 1710, University of Glasgow) was a socially and politically influential New England Puritan
Puritan
minister, prolific author, and pamphleteer. He left a scientific legacy due to his hybridization experiments and his promotion of inoculation for disease prevention, though he is most frequently remembered today for his involvement in the Salem witch trials. He was subsequently denied the presidency of Harvard College which his father, Increase Mather, had held.Contents1 Life and work1.1 Boyle's influence on Mather 1.2 Increase Mather 1.3 Yale College2 Salem witch trials
Salem witch trials
of 1692, the Mather influence2.1 Pre-trials 2.2 The court 2.3 Caution on the use of spectral evidence 2.4 Post-trials 2.5 Poole vs. Upham 2.6 The debate continues: Kittredge vs
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Book Of Genesis
The Book
Book
of Genesis (from the Latin Vulgate, in turn borrowed or transliterated from Greek γένεσις, meaning "Origin"; Hebrew: בְּרֵאשִׁית‬, Bərēšīṯ, "In [the] beginning") is the first book of the Hebrew Bible
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Public Domain
The legal term public domain refers to works whose exclusive intellectual property rights have expired,[1] have been forfeited,[2] have been expressly waived, or are inapplicable.[3] For example, the works of Shakespeare
Shakespeare
and Beethoven, and most early silent films are in the public domain either by virtue of their having been created before copyright existed, or by their copyright term having expired.[1] Some works are not covered by copyright, and are therefore in the public domain—among them the formulae of Newtonian physics, cooking recipes,[4] and all computer software created prior to 1974.[5]
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Timothy Jollie
Timothy Jollie, (c. 1659–1714), was a nonconformist minister and notable educator in the north of England.Contents1 Biography 2 Jollie's academy 3 Upper Chapel 4 Death, family 5 Publications 6 Notes 7 ReferencesBiography[edit] Timothy Jollie, son of Thomas Jollie, was born at Altham, Accrington, Lancashire, about 1659. On 27 August 1673 he entered the dissenting academy of Richard Frankland at Rathmell, Yorkshire. He left it in December 1675 to study in London, where he became a member of the independent church at Girdlers' Hall, Basinghall Street, under George Griffith. In 1679 he was called to an independent church in a newly erected meeting-house at Snig Hall, Sheffield. He was ordained on 28 April 1681 by his father, with Oliver Heywood and two other ministers, at the house of Abel Yates in Sheffield. Heywood notes the occasion as remarkable, seeing that an independent church, with but two objectors, allowed their pastor to be ordained by presbyters
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Isaac Watts
Isaac Watts
Isaac Watts
(/wɒts/; 17 July 1674 – 25 November 1748) was an English Christian minister (Congregational), hymn writer, theologian, and logician. He was a prolific and popular hymn writer and is credited with some 750 hymns. He is recognized as the "Godfather of English Hymnody;" many of his hymns remain in use today and have been translated into numerous languages.Contents1 Life 2 Watts and hymnody2.1 Logic3 Legacy, honours and memorials 4 Cultural or contemporary influences 5 Works5.1 Books 5.2 Hymns6 See also 7 Notes 8 References 9 External linksLife[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
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Daniel Neal
Daniel Neal
Daniel Neal
(14 December 1678 – 4 April 1743) was an English historian. Biography[edit] Born in London, he was educated at the Merchant Taylors' School, and at the universities of Utrecht and Leiden. In 1704 he became assistant minister, and in 1706 sole minister, of an independent congregation worshipping in Aldersgate
Aldersgate
Street, and afterwards in Jewin Street, London, where he remained almost until his death. He married Elizabeth Lardner (d. 1748), by whom he had one son, Nathanael, and two daughters.[1] In 1720 Neal published his History of New England, which obtained for its author the honorary degree of MA from Harvard College. He also undertook to assist Dr John Evans in writing a history of Nonconformity
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Philip Doddridge
Philip Doddridge
Philip Doddridge
D.D
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University Of St. Andrews
University
University
of St Andrews                                 St Mary's College                                       School of Medicine                                 St Leonard's College                                 
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Thomas Cogan
Thomas Cogan
Thomas Cogan
(8 February 1736 – 2 February 1818) was an English nonconformist physician, a founder of the Royal Humane Society and philosophical writer.Contents1 Life 2 Royal Humane Society 3 Works 4 ReferencesLife[edit] He was born at Rothwell, Northamptonshire
Rothwell, Northamptonshire
on 8 February 1736, the half-brother of Eliezer Cogan. For two or three years he was placed in the dissenting academy at Kibworth Beauchamp, run by John Aikin, but was removed at the age of fourteen, and spent the next two years with his father. He was then sent to the Mile End
Mile End
academy, where John Conder was the divinity tutor, but was transferred at his own request to a similar institution at Homerton
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Abraham Rees
Abraham Rees
Abraham Rees
(1743 – 9 June 1825) was a Welsh nonconformist minister, and compiler of Rees's Cyclopædia
Rees's Cyclopædia
(in 45 volumes).Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 References 4 External linksLife[edit] He was the second son of Lewis Rees, by his wife Esther, daughter of Abraham Penry, and was born at born in Llanbrynmair, Montgomeryshire. Lewis Rees (b. 2 March 1710; d 21 March 1800) was independent minister at Llanbrynmair
Llanbrynmair
(1734–1759) and Mynyddbach, Glamorganshire (1759–1800). Abraham was educated for the ministry at Coward's academy in Wellclose Square, near London, under David Jennings, entering in 1759
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Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names
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Système Universitaire De Documentation
The système universitaire de documentation or SUDOC is a system used by the libraries of French universities and higher education establishments to identify, track and manage the documents in their possession. The catalog, which contains more than 10 million references, allows students and researcher to search for bibliographical and location information in over 3,400 documentation centers. It is maintained by the Bibliographic Agency for Higher Education (fr) (ABES). External links[edit]Official websiteThis article relating to library science or information science is a stub
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Dictionary Of National Biography
The Dictionary of National Biography
Biography
(DNB) is a standard work of reference on notable figures from British history, published from 1885. The updated Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
Biography
(ODNB) was published on 23 September 2004 in 60 volumes and online, with 50,113 biographical articles covering 54,922 lives.Contents1 First series 2 Supplements and revisions 3 Concise dictionary 4 Oxford Dictionary of National Biography 5 First series contents 6 See also 7 Notes 8 External linksFirst series[edit] Hoping to emulate national biographical collections published elsewhere in Europe, such as the Allgemeine Deutsche Biographie (1875), in 1882 the publisher George Smith (1824–1901), of Smith, Elder & Co., planned a universal dictionary that would include biographical entries on individuals from world history. He approached Leslie Stephen, then editor of the Cornhill Magazine, owned by Smith, to become the editor
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