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David Hirshleifer
David Hirshleifer is an American economist. He is a professor of finance and currently holds the Merage
Merage
chair in Business Growth at the University of California
California
at Irvine. In 2017, he is elected as Vice President of the American Finance Association (AFA) and assigned as Research Associate to National Bureau of Economic Research. He was previously a professor at the University of Michigan, The Ohio State University, and UCLA. His research is mostly related to behavioral finance and informational cascades. In 2007, he was on the Top 100 list of most cited economist by web of science's Most-Cited Scientists in Economics & Business.[1]Contents1 Background 2 Research 3 Books 4 Selected publications 5 References 6 External linksBackground[edit] David is the son of Jack Hirshleifer, a deceased UCLA
UCLA
economics professor
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California
Native languages as of 2007English 57.4%[2] Spanish 28.5%[3] Chinese 2.8%[3] Filipino 2.2%[3]Demonym CalifornianCapital SacramentoLargest city Los AngelesLargest metro Greater Los Angeles
Los Angeles
AreaArea Ranked 3rd • Total 163,696 sq mi (423,970 km2) • Width 250 miles (400 km) • Length 770 miles (1,240 km) • % water 4.7 • Latitude 32°32′ N to 42° N • Longitude 114°8′ W to 124°26′ W
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Financial Crisis (2007–present)
The financial crisis of 2007–2008, also known as the global financial crisis and the 2008 financial crisis, is considered by many economists to have been the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression of the 1930s.[1][2][3][4] It began in 2007 with a crisis in the subprime mortgage market in the United States, and developed into a full-blown international banking crisis with the collapse of the investment bank Lehman Brothers
Lehman Brothers
on September 15, 2008.[5] Excessive risk-taking by banks such as Lehman Brothers helped to magnify the financial impact globally.[6] Massive bail-outs of financial institutions and other palliative monetary and fiscal policies were employed to prevent a possible collapse of the world financial system. The crisis was nonetheless followed by a global economic downturn, the Great Recession
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Asset Pricing
In financial economics, asset pricing refers to a formal treatment and development of two main pricing principles,[1] outlined below. " Investment
Investment
theory", which is near synonymous, encompasses the body of knowledge used to support the decision-making process of choosing investments.[2] In corporate finance usage, "asset pricing" refers to estimating the value of an investment, usually its net present value; see Valuation (finance). The first principle: general equilibrium asset pricing where prices are determined through market pricing by supply and demand. The second: rational pricing where (usually) derivative prices are calculated such that they are arbitrage-free with respect to more fundamental (equilibrium determined) securities prices
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Corporate Finance
Corporate finance
Corporate finance
is the area of finance dealing with the sources of funding and the capital structure of corporations, the actions that managers take to increase the value of the firm to the shareholders, and the tools and analysis used to allocate financial resources. The primary goal of corporate finance is to maximize or increase shareholder value.[1] Although it is in principle different from managerial finance which studies the financial management of all firms, rather than corporations alone, the main concepts in the study of corporate finance are applicable to the financial problems of all kinds of firms. Correspondingly, corporate finance comprises two main sub-disciplines.[citation needed] Capital budgeting
Capital budgeting
is concerned with the setting of criteria about which value-adding projects should receive investment funding, and whether to finance that investment with equity or debt capital
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Momentum (finance)
In finance, momentum is the empirically observed tendency for rising asset prices to rise further, and falling prices to keep falling. For instance, it was shown that stocks with strong past performance continue to outperform stocks with poor past performance in the next period with an average excess return of about 1% per month.[1][2] Momentum signals (e.g., 52-week high) have been shown to be used by financial analysts in their buy and sell recommendations.[3] The existence of momentum is a market anomaly, which finance theory struggles to explain. The difficulty is that an increase in asset prices, in and of itself, should not warrant further increase. Such increase, according to the efficient-market hypothesis, is warranted only by changes in demand and supply or new information (cf. fundamental analysis). Students of financial economics have largely attributed the appearance of momentum to cognitive biases, which belong in the realm of behavioral economics
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Post Earnings Announcement Drift
In financial economics and accounting research, post–earnings-announcement drift, or PEAD (also named the SUE effect) is the tendency for a stock’s cumulative abnormal returns to drift in the direction of an earnings surprise for several weeks (even several months) following an earnings announcement. Once a firm's current earnings become known, the information content should be quickly digested by investors and incorporated into the efficient market price. However, it has long been known that this is not exactly what happens. For firms that report good news in quarterly earnings, their abnormal security returns tend to drift upwards for at least 60 days following their earnings announcement. Similarly, firms that report bad news in earnings tend to have their abnormal security returns drift downwards for a similar period. This phenomenon is called post-announcement drift. This was initially proposed by the information content study of Ray J. Ball & P
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New York Stock Exchange
nyse.comNew York Stock
Stock
ExchangeU.S. National Register of Historic PlacesU.S. National Historic LandmarkNYC LandmarkFront Elevation of the New York Stock
Stock
Exchange.Show map of Lower ManhattanShow map of New YorkShow map of the USCoordinates 40°42′24.6″N 74°0′39.7″W / 40.706833°N 74.011028°W / 40.706833; -74.011028Coordinates: 40°42′24.6″N 74°0′39.7″W / 40.706833°N 74.011028°W / 40.706833; -74.011028Built 1903Architect Trowbridge & Livingston; George B. PostArchitectural style Classical RevivalNRHP reference # 78001877Significant datesAdded to NRHP June 2, 1978[4]Designated NHL June 2, 1978[5]Designated NYCL July 9, 1985The New York Stock
Stock
Exchange (abbreviated as NYSE and nicknamed "The Big Board"),[6] is an American stock exchange located at 11 Wall Street, Lower Manhattan, New York City, New York
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Initial Public Offering
Initial public offering
Initial public offering
(IPO) or stock market launch is a type of public offering in which shares of a company are sold to institutional investors[1] and usually also retail (individual) investors; an IPO is underwritten by one or more investment banks, who also arrange for the shares to be listed on one or more stock exchange. Through this process, colloquially known as floating, or going public, a privately held company is transformed into a public company. Initial public offerings can be used: to raise new equity capital for the company concerned; to monetize the investments of private shareholders such as company founders or private equity investors; and to enable easy trading of existing holdings or future capital raising by becoming publicly traded enterprises. After the IPO, those shares which trade freely in the open market are known as the free float
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Financial Regulation
Financial regulation
Financial regulation
is a form of regulation or supervision, which subjects financial institutions to certain requirements, restrictions and guidelines, aiming to maintain the integrity of the financial system. This may be handled by either a government or non-government organization
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Paul Merage School Of Business
The Paul Merage School of Business is the business school at the University of California, Irvine
University of California, Irvine
(UCI). It is one of the university's 14 academic units. The current Dean is Eric Spangenberg. The school confers Master of Business Administration (MBA) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), degrees Master of Accountancy (MPAc) program, Master of Science in Biotechnology Management (MSBTM), Master of Science in Engineering Management (MSEM), and Bachelor of Arts in Business Administration.[1]Contents1 History 2 Current 3 Rankings 4 See also 5 References 6 Sources 7 External linksHistory[edit] The school originated as the Graduate School of Administration in 1965 only offering graduate degrees in Master of Science in Administration, Master of Public Administration, and Master of Business and Public Administration
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
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Michael Skapinker
Michael Skapinker (born 1955 in South Africa) is a South African journalist. He is presently an Associate Editor of the Financial Times and a columnist.Contents1 Life and career1.1 Education 1.2 Print Journalism 1.3 Awards and recognition2 References 3 External linksLife and career[edit] Education[edit] Skapinker graduated with a BA in Law from the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg
Johannesburg
and a Master's degree from Queens’ College, Cambridge
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Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names
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International Standard Name Identifier
The International Standard Name Identifier (ISNI) is an identifier for uniquely identifying the public identities of contributors to media content such as books, television programmes, and newspaper articles. Such an identifier consists of 16 digits. It can optionally be displayed as divided into four blocks. It was developed under the auspices of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) as Draft International Standard 27729; the valid standard was published on 15 March 2012
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Système Universitaire De Documentation
The système universitaire de documentation or SUDOC is a system used by the libraries of French universities and higher education establishments to identify, track and manage the documents in their possession. The catalog, which contains more than 10 million references, allows students and researcher to search for bibliographical and location information in over 3,400 documentation centers. It is maintained by the Bibliographic Agency for Higher Education (fr) (ABES). External links[edit]Official websiteThis article relating to library science or information science is a stub
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