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David Hirshleifer
DAVID HIRSHLEIFER is an American economist . He is a professor of finance and currently holds the Merage chair in Business Growth at the University of California
California
at Irvine . In 2017, he is elected as Vice President of the American Finance Association (AFA) and assigned as Research Associate to National Bureau of Economic Research. He was previously a professor at the University of Michigan
University of Michigan
, The Ohio State University , and UCLA
UCLA
. His research is mostly related to behavioral finance and informational cascades . In 2007, he was on the Top 100 list of most cited economist by web of science 's Most-Cited Scientists in Economics Glazer, Amihai; Hirshleifer, David (2005). "Price theory and applications: Decisions, markets, and information". Cambridge University Press (7 ed.). * Bikhchandani, Sushil; Hirshleifer, David; Welch, Ivo (1992)
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Post Earnings Announcement Drift
In financial economics and accounting research , POST–EARNINGS-ANNOUNCEMENT DRIFT, or PEAD (also named the SUE EFFECT) is the tendency for a stock’s cumulative abnormal returns to drift in the direction of an earnings surprise for several weeks (even several months) following an earnings announcement. Once a firm's current earnings become known, the information content should be quickly digested by investors and incorporated into the efficient market price. However, it has long been known that this is not exactly what happens. For firms that report good news in quarterly earnings, their abnormal security returns tend to drift upwards for at least 60 days following their earnings announcement. Similarly, firms that report bad news in earnings tend to have their abnormal security returns drift downwards for a similar period. This phenomenon is called post-announcement drift. This was initially proposed by the information content study of Ray J. Ball & P
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New York Stock Exchange
nyse.com New York Stock
Stock
Exchange U.S. National Register of Historic Places
National Register of Historic Places
U.S. National Historic Landmark
National Historic Landmark
NYC Landmark Front Elevation of the New York Stock
Stock
Exchange. Show map of Lower Manhattan Show map of New York Show map of the US COORDINATES 40°42′24.6″N 74°0′39.7″W / 40.706833°N 74.011028°W / 40.706833; -74.011028 Coordinates : 40°42′24.6″N 74°0′39.7″W / 40.706833°N 74.011028°W / 40.706833; -74.011028 BUILT 1903 ARCHITECT Trowbridge George B
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Initial Public Offering
INITIAL PUBLIC OFFERING (IPO) or STOCK MARKET LAUNCH is a type of public offering in which shares of a company usually are sold to institutional investors that in turn, sell to the general public, on a securities exchange , for the first time. Through this process, a privately held company transforms into a public company . Initial public offerings are mostly used by companies to raise the expansion of capital, possibly to monetize the investments of early private investors, and to become publicly traded enterprises. A company selling shares is never required to repay the capital to its public investors. After the IPO, when shares trade freely in the open market, money passes between public investors
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Momentum (finance)
In finance, MOMENTUM is the empirically observed tendency for rising asset prices to rise further, and falling prices to keep falling. For instance, it was shown that stocks with strong past performance continue to outperform stocks with poor past performance in the next period with an average excess return of about 1% per month. Momentum signals (e.g., 52-week high) have been shown to be used by financial analysts in their buy and sell recommendations. The existence of momentum is a market anomaly , which finance theory struggles to explain. The difficulty is that an increase in asset prices, in and of itself, should not warrant further increase. Such increase, according to the efficient-market hypothesis , is warranted only by changes in demand and supply or new information (cf. fundamental analysis ). Students of financial economics have largely attributed the appearance of momentum to cognitive biases , which belong in the realm of behavioral economics
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Corporate Finance
CORPORATE FINANCE is the area of finance dealing with the sources of funding and the capital structure of corporations, the actions that managers take to increase the value of the firm to the shareholders , and the tools and analysis used to allocate financial resources. The primary goal of corporate finance is to maximize or increase shareholder value . Although it is in principle different from managerial finance which studies the financial management of all firms, rather than corporations alone, the main concepts in the study of corporate finance are applicable to the financial problems of all kinds of firms. Investment
Investment
analysis (or capital budgeting ) is concerned with the setting of criteria about which value-adding projects should receive investment funding, and whether to finance that investment with equity or debt capital
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California
Native languages as of 2007 * English 57.4% * Spanish 28.5% * Chinese 2.8% * Filipino 2.2% DEMONYM Californian CAPITAL Sacramento LARGEST CITY Los Angeles
Los Angeles
LARGEST METRO Greater Los Angeles
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Social Influence
SOCIAL INFLUENCE occurs when a person's emotions, opinions, or behaviors are affected by others. Social influence takes many forms and can be seen in conformity , socialization , peer pressure , obedience, leadership , persuasion , sales , and marketing . In 1958, Harvard psychologist Herbert Kelman identified three broad varieties of social influence. * COMPLIANCE is when people appear to agree with others but actually keep their dissenting opinions private. * IDENTIFICATION is when people are influenced by someone who is liked and respected, such as a famous celebrity. * INTERNALIZATION is when people accept a belief or behavior and agree both publicly and privately.Morton Deutsch and Harold Gerard described two psychological needs that lead humans to conform to the expectations of others. These include our need to be right (informational social influence ) and our need to be liked (normative social influence )
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Asset Pricing
In finance , VALUATION is the process of determining the present value (PV) of an asset . Valuations can be done on assets (for example, investments in marketable securities such as stocks , options , business enterprises, or intangible assets such as patents and trademarks ) or on liabilities (e.g., bonds issued by a company). Valuations are needed for many reasons such as investment analysis , capital budgeting , merger and acquisition transactions, financial reporting , taxable events to determine the proper tax liability, and in litigation
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Financial Crisis (2007–present)
The FINANCIAL CRISIS OF 2007–2008, also known as the GLOBAL FINANCIAL CRISIS and the 2008 FINANCIAL CRISIS, is considered by many economists to have been the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression of the 1930s. It began in 2007 with a crisis in the subprime mortgage market in the US, and developed into a full-blown international banking crisis with the federal takeover of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac and the collapse of a number of major investment banks, including the bankruptcy of Lehman Brothers on September 15, 2008. Excessive risk-taking by banks such as Lehman Brothers
Lehman Brothers
helped to magnify the financial impact globally. Massive bail-outs of financial institutions and other palliative monetary and fiscal policies were employed to prevent a possible collapse of the world financial system
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Financial Regulation
FINANCIAL REGULATION is a form of regulation or supervision, which subjects financial institutions to certain requirements, restrictions and guidelines, aiming to maintain the integrity of the financial system. This may be handled by either a government or non-government organization. Financial regulation
Financial regulation
has also influenced the structure of banking sectors, by decreasing borrowing costs and increasing the variety of financial products available
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Système Universitaire De Documentation
The SYSTèME UNIVERSITAIRE DE DOCUMENTATION or SUDOC is a system used by the libraries of French universities and higher education establishments to identify, track and manage the documents in their possession. The catalog, which contains more than 10 million references, allows students and researcher to search for bibliographical and location information in over 3,400 documentation centers
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Bibliothèque Nationale De France
The BIBLIOTHèQUE NATIONALE DE FRANCE (BNF; French: ) is the National Library of France
France
, located in Paris
Paris
. It is the national repository of all that is published in France. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 New buildings * 3 Mission * 4 Manuscript
Manuscript
collection * 5 Digital library * 6 Popular culture * 7 See also * 8 References * 9 Further reading * 10 External links HISTORYThe National Library of France
France
traces its origin to the royal library founded at the Louvre Palace by Charles V in 1368. Charles had received a collection of manuscripts from his predecessor, John II , and transferred them to the Louvre
Louvre
from the Palais de la Cité
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Special
SPECIAL or SPECIALS may refer to: CONTENTS * 1 Music * 2 Film and television * 3 Other uses * 4 See also MUSIC * Special (album) , a 1992 album by Vesta Williams * "Special" (Garbage song) , 1998 * "Special" (Mew song) , 2005 * "Special" (Stephen Lynch song) , 2000 * The Specials
The Specials
, a British band * "Special", a song by Violent Femmes on The Blind Leading the Naked * "Special", a song on
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International Standard Name Identifier
The INTERNATIONAL STANDARD NAME IDENTIFIER (ISNI) is an identifier for uniquely identifying the public identities of contributors to media content such as books, television programmes, and newspaper articles. Such an identifier consists of 16 digits. It can optionally be displayed as divided into four blocks. It was developed under the auspices of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) as Draft International Standard 27729; the valid standard was published on 15 March 2012. The ISO technical committee 46, subcommittee 9 ( TC 46/SC 9 ) is responsible for the development of the standard. ISNI can be used to disambiguate names that might otherwise be confused, and links the data about names that are collected and used in all sectors of the media industries
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Library Of Congress Control Number
The LIBRARY OF CONGRESS CONTROL NUMBER (LCCN) is a serially based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Classification . CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Format * 3 See also * 4 References * 5 External links HISTORYThe LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names. The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
prepared cards of bibliographic information for their library catalog and would sell duplicate sets of the cards to other libraries for use in their catalogs
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