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David Foster (novelist)
David Manning Foster (born 15 May 1944) is an Australian novelist and scientist. He has written a range of satires on the theme of the decline of Western civilization, as well as producing short stories, poetry, essays, and a number of radio plays.Contents1 Early life and education 2 Career2.1 Scientific and early literary career 2.2 Literary career3 Personal life 4 Awards 5 Selected works 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksEarly life and education[edit] David Manning Foster was born on 15 May 1944 in the Blue Mountains[1] in New South Wales, Australia to George and Hazel (née Manning) Foster, vaudeville and radio performers who separated before his birth, and spent his early years in Katoomba, raised by his mother and maternal grandparents.[2][3] In 1950, Foster spent six months in Katoomba Hospital recovering from poliomyelitis, a disease that left him with a slight limp
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Postdoctoral Research
Post-doctoral researchers by discipline (United States, 2012)[1]   Life sciences (65%)   Physical sciences (13%)   Engineering (11%)   Math and computer sciences (3%)   Geosciences (3%)   Psychology, social sciences and others (5%)A postdoctoral researcher or postdoc is a person professionally conducting research after the completion of their doctoral studies (typically a PhD). The ultimate goal of a postdoctoral research position is to pursue additional research, training, or teaching in order to have better skills to pursue a career in academia, research, or any other fields.[2] Postdocs often, but not always, have a temporary academic appointment, sometimes in preparation for an academic faculty position. They continue their studies or carry out research and further increase expertise in a specialist subject, including integrating a team and acquiring novel skills and research methods
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University Medal
A University
University
Medal is one of several different types of awards, bestowed by universities upon outstanding students or members of staff
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Bundanoon, New South Wales
Bundanoon /ˈbʌndəˌnuːn/ is a town in the Southern Highlands of New South Wales, Australia, in Wingecarribee Shire. At the 2016 census, Bundanoon had a population of 2,729.[1] It is an Aboriginal name meaning "place of deep gullies"[2] and was formerly known as Jordan's Crossing. Bundanoon is colloquially known as Bundy / Bundi. Bundanoon, like its fellow Southern Villages of the Southern Highlands, New South Wales, has had a boom-and-bust economic cycle. The town became a well-known tourist destination early in the 20th century; its picturesqueness and the scenery of what is now Morton National Park, combined with being served by the railway network, made it a pleasant and convenient holiday area for city dwellers who could not afford more expensive accommodations at the popular Blue Mountains resort area
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Arabian Nights
StylesArchitecture of ancient Yemen Nabataean architecture Umayyad architecture Abbasid architecture Fatimid architecture Moorish architecture Mamluk
Mamluk
architectureFeaturesAblaq Hypostyle Mashrabiya Iwan Liwan Riwaq Qadad Moroccan riad Sahn Tadelakt Vaulting Voussoir Multifoil arch Horseshoe arch Arabic
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One Thousand And One Nights
StylesArchitecture of ancient Yemen Nabataean architecture Umayyad architecture Abbasid architecture Fatimid architecture Moorish architecture Mamluk
Mamluk
architectureFeaturesAblaq Hypostyle Mashrabiya Iwan Liwan Riwaq Qadad Moroccan riad Sahn Tadelakt Vaulting Voussoir Multifoil arch Horseshoe arch Arabic
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The Venetian Twins
The Venetian Twins (Italian - I due gemelli veneziani, or "The two Venetian twins") is a 1747 play by Carlo Goldoni, based on Plautus's Menaechmi. Recent productions include one at the Watermill Theatre[1] and a 1993 production directed by Michael Bogdanov for the Royal Shakespeare Company.[2] [3] The play has also been adapted and staged as a 1979 Australian two-act musical comedy. The play was performed by Greene Shoots Theatre at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival at C Venues (main) in August 2010.[4] Shakespeare & Company (Massachusetts) is presenting it in English as part of its outdoor Bankside Festival, June 29-August 27, 2011, at Lenox, Massachusetts. References[edit]^ "Watermill - The Venetian Twins". Retrieved 2012-06-16.  ^ Morley, Sheridan (12 October 1994). ""Twins" Is No Favor to Goldoni". International Herald Tribune. Retrieved 2012-06-12.  ^ Taylor, Paul (8 June 1993)
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Colonialism
Colonialism
Colonialism
is the policy of a nation seeking to extend or retain its authority over other people or territories, generally with the aim of developing or exploiting them to the benefit of the colonizing country and helping the colonies modernize in terms defined by the colonizers, especially in economics, religion and health. The European colonial period was the era from the 15th century to 1914 when Spain, Portugal, Britain, Russia, France, the Netherlands, Germany, and several smaller European countries such a Belgium and Italy, established colonies outside Europe.[1] It has been estimated that by 1914, Europeans had gained control of 84% of the globe, and by 1800, before the Industrial Revolution
Industrial Revolution
had taken hold, they already controlled at least 35% (excluding Antarctica).[2] The system practically ended between 1945–1975 when nearly all colonies became independent
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Economic Materialism
Materialism
Materialism
is a personal attitude which attaches importance to acquiring and consuming material goods. The use of the term materialistic to describe a person's personality or a society tends to have a negative or critical connotation. Also called acquisitiveness, it is often associated with a value system which regards social status as being determined by affluence (see conspicuous consumption), as well as the belief that possessions can provide happiness. Environmentalism
Environmentalism
can be considered a competing orientation to materialism.[1] Materialism
Materialism
can be considered a pragmatic form of enlightened self-interest based on a prudent understanding of the character of market-oriented economy and society
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Australia Council For The Arts
The Australia
Australia
Council for the Arts, informally known as the Australia Council, is the official arts council or arts funding body of the Government of Australia.Contents1 Function 2 History 3 Boards 4 References 5 External linksFunction[edit] It is responsible for funding arts projects around Australia, formulating and implementing policies to foster and promote the arts in Australia. The Council also advises governments and industry on arts-related issues. Each year, Australia
Australia
Council provides over 1700 grants to artists and arts organisations
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University Of Pennsylvania
The University
University
of Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
(commonly known as Penn or UPenn) is a private Ivy League
Ivy League
research university located in the University
University
City section of Philadelphia. Incorporated as The Trustees of the University
University
of Pennsylvania, Penn is one of 14 founding members of the Association of American Universities
Association of American Universities
and one of the nine colonial colleges chartered before the American Revolution.[5] Benjamin Franklin, Penn's founder, advocated an educational program that focused as much on practical education for commerce and public service as on the classics and theology, though his proposed curriculum was never adopted
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Novelist
A novelist is an author or writer of novels, though often novelists also write in other genres of both fiction and non-fiction. Some novelists are professional novelists, thus make a living writing novels and other fiction, while others aspire to support themselves in this way or write as an avocation. Most novelists struggle to get their debut novel published, but once published they often continue to be published, although very few become literary celebrities, thus gaining prestige or a considerable income from their work. Novelists come from a variety of backgrounds and social classes, and frequently this shapes the content of their works. Public reception of a novelist's work, the literary criticism commenting on it, and the novelists' incorporation of their own experiences into works and characters can lead to the author's personal life and identity being associated with a novel's fictional content
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Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
(/ˌpɛnsɪlˈveɪniə/ ( listen); Pennsylvania German: Pennsylvaani or Pennsilfaani), officially the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, is a state located in the northeastern and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States. The Appalachian Mountains
Appalachian Mountains
run through its middle. The Commonwealth is bordered by Delaware
Delaware
to the southeast, Maryland
Maryland
to the south, West Virginia
West Virginia
to the southwest, Ohio
Ohio
to the west, Lake Erie
Lake Erie
and the Canadian province of Ontario
Ontario
to the northwest, New York to the north, and New Jersey
New Jersey
to the east. Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
is the 33rd-largest, the 5th-most populous, and the 9th-most densely populated of the 50 United States
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Philadelphia
Philadelphia
Philadelphia
(/ˌfɪləˈdɛlfiə/) is the largest city in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
and the sixth-most populous city in the United States, with an estimated population of 1,567,872[7] and more than 6 million in the seventh-largest metropolitan statistical area, as of 2016[update].[5] Philadelphia
Philadelphia
is the economic and cultural anchor of the Delaware
Delaware
Valley, located along the lower Delaware
Delaware
and Schuylkill Rivers, within the Northeast megalopolis
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Australian National University
The Australian
The Australian
National University (ANU) is a national research university located in Canberra, the capital of Australia. Its main campus in Acton encompasses seven teaching and research colleges, in addition to several national academies and institutes.[2] Founded in 1946, it is the only university to have been created by the Parliament of Australia
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Bioinorganic Chemistry
Bioinorganic chemistry
Bioinorganic chemistry
is a field that examines the role of metals in biology. Bioinorganic chemistry
Bioinorganic chemistry
includes the study of both natural phenomena such as the behavior of metalloproteins as well as artificially introduced metals, including those that are non-essential, in medicine and toxicology. Many biological processes such as respiration depend upon molecules that fall within the realm of inorganic chemistry
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