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David Brock
David Brock (born July 23, 1962[1]) is an American liberal political operative, author, and commentator who founded the media watchdog group Media Matters for America.[2] He has been described by Time as "one of the most influential operatives in the Democratic Party" while others believe his tactics led to Hillary Clinton's defeat in the 2016 Presidential election.[3] Brock, who began his career as a right-wing investigative reporter during the 1990s,[4] wrote the book The Real Anita Hill
The Real Anita Hill
and the Troopergate story, which led to Paula Jones filing a lawsuit against Bill Clinton
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Los Angeles Times
The Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Times is a daily newspaper which has been published in Los Angeles, California
Los Angeles, California
since 1881
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Jane Mayer
Jane Meredith Mayer[2] (born 1955)[3][4] is an American investigative journalist who has been a staff writer for The New Yorker
The New Yorker
since 1995.[1] In recent years, she has written for that publication on money in politics, government prosecution of whistleblowers, the United States
United State

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Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia
District of Columbia
and commonly referred to as Washington or D.C., is the capital of the United States of America.[4] Founded after the American Revolution
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The Wall Street Journal
The Wall Street
Wall Street
Journal is an American business-focused, English-language international daily newspaper based in New York City. The Journal, along with its Asian and European editions, is published six days a week by Dow Jones & Company, a division of News Corp. The newspaper is published in the broadsheet format and online. The Wall Street
Wall Street
Journal is the largest newspaper in the United States by circulation. According to News Corp, in their June 2017 10-K Filing with the SEC, the Journal had a circulation of about 2.277 million copies (including nearly 1,270,000 digital subscriptions) as of June 2017[update],[2] compared with USA Today's 1.7 million. The newspaper has won 40 Pulitzer Prizes through 2017[3] and derives its name from Wall Street
Wall Street
in the heart of the Financial District of Lower Manhattan
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John Podhoretz
John Mordecai Podhoretz[1] (/pɒdˈhɔːrɪts/; born April 18, 1961) is an American writer. He is the editor of Commentary magazine, a columnist for the New York Post, the author of several books on politics, and a former presidential speechwriter.Contents1 Life and career1.1 Political commentary1.1.1 George W. Bush 1.1.2 Israel 1.1.3 Iraq War 1.1.4 Immigration 1.1.5 Jill Carroll incident 1.1.6 Conflicts with John Derbyshire 1.1.7 Other commentary1.2 Personal life and family2 Notes 3 Books 4 External linksLife and career[edit] Podhoretz was born to a Jewish family in New York City, the son of conservative journalists Norman Podhoretz and Midge Decter; he is his mother's youngest child of four, and his father's youngest child of two. He grew up on the Upper West Side in New York City. He attended Columbia Grammar and Preparatory School and he received a bachelor's degree from the University of Chicago in 1982
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The Washington Times
The Washington Times
The Washington Times
is an American daily newspaper that covers general interest topics with a particular emphasis on American politics. The paper is published as a broadsheet at 3600 New York Avenue NE, Washington, D.C..[3] One of the first broadsheets in the United States to adopt color photography, its daily edition is distributed throughout the District of Columbia and sections of Maryland
Maryland
and Virginia. A weekly tabloid edition aimed at a national audience is also published.[4] A typical issue includes sections for world and national news, business, politics, editorials and opinion pieces, local news, sports, entertainment, and travel
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Insight On The News
Insight on the News
Insight on the News
(also called Insight) was an American conservative print and online news magazine. It was owned by News World Communications, an international media conglomerate founded by Unification Church founder Sun Myung Moon, which at the time owned The Washington Times, United Press International, and several newspapers in Japan, South Korea, Africa, and South America
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The Heritage Foundation
The Heritage Foundation
The Heritage Foundation
(abbreviated to Heritage)[1][2] is an American conservative public policy think tank based in Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C.
The foundation took a leading role in the conservative movement during the presidency of Ronald Reagan, whose policies were taken from Heritage's policy study Mandate for Leadership.[4] Heritage has since continued to have a significant influence in U.S. public policy making, and is considered to be one of the most influential conservative research organizations in the United States. After the 2016 election of Donald Trump as U.S. President, Heritage board member Rebekah Mercer played a major role in shaping his transition team.[5]Contents1 History and major initiatives1.1 Early years 1.2 Reagan administration
Reagan administration
years 1.3 George H. W. Bush
George H. W

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Clarence Thomas
Clarence Thomas
Clarence Thomas
(born June 23, 1948) is an American judge, lawyer, and government official who currently serves as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. Thomas succeeded Thurgood Marshall and is the second African American
African American
to serve on the court. Thomas grew up in Savannah, Georgia, and was educated at the College of the Holy Cross and at Yale Law School. In 1974, he was appointed an Assistant Attorney General in Missouri
Missouri
and subsequently practiced law there in the private sector. In 1979, he became a legislative assistant to Senator John Danforth
John Danforth
(R-MO) and in 1981 was appointed Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights at the U.S. Department of Education
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The New Yorker
The New Yorker
The New Yorker
is an American magazine of reportage, commentary, criticism, essays, fiction, satire, cartoons, and poetry. It is published by Condé Nast. Started as a weekly in 1925, the magazine is now published 47 times annually, with five of these issues covering two-week spans. Although its reviews and events listings often focus on the cultural life of New York City, The New Yorker
The New Yorker
has a wide audience outside New York and is read internationally
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Jill Abramson
Jill Ellen Abramson (born March 19, 1954)[1] is an American author and journalist best known as the former executive editor of The New York Times. Abramson held that position from September 2011 to May 2014. She was the first female executive editor in the paper's 160-year history.[2] Abramson joined the New York Times in 1997, working as the Washington bureau chief and managing editor before being named as executive editor
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Paramus, New Jersey
Paramus (/pəˈræməs/ pə-RAM-əs, with the accent on the second syllable[20]) is a borough in Bergen County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States
United States
Census, the borough's population was 26,342,[9][10][11] reflecting an increase of 605 (+2.4%) from the 25,737 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 670 (+2.7%) from the 25,067 counted in the 1990 Census.[21] A suburb of New York City, Paramus is located 15 to 20 miles (24 to 32 km) northwest of Midtown Manhattan
Midtown Manhattan
and approximately 8 miles (13 km) west of Upper Manhattan
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Arkansas
Arkansas
Arkansas
(/ˈɑːrkənsɔː/ AR-kən-saw)[c] is a state in the southeastern region of the United States, home to over 3 million people as of 2017.[7][8] Its name is of Siouan derivation from the language of the Osage denoting their related kin, the Quapaw Indians.[9] The state's diverse geography ranges from the mountainous regions of the Ozark and the Ouachita Mountains, which make up the U.S. Interior Highlands, to the densely forested land in the south known as the Arkansas
Arkansas
Timberlands, to the eastern lowlands along the Mississippi River
Mississippi River
and the Arkansas
Arkansas
Delta. Arkansas
Arkansas
is the 29th largest by area and the 33rd most populous of the 50 United States. The capital and most populous city is Little Rock, located in the central portion of the state, a hub for transportation, business, culture, and government
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Sexual Harassment
Sexual harassment
Sexual harassment
is bullying or coercion of a sexual nature, or the unwelcome or inappropriate promise of rewards in exchange for sexual favors.[1] In most modern legal contexts, sexual harassment is illegal
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Kenneth Starr
Kenneth Winston Starr (born July 21, 1946) is an American lawyer who has also been a United States
United States
circuit judge and U.S. solicitor general. He is the former president and chancellor of Baylor University, and formerly held the Louise L. Morrison chair of constitutional law at Baylor University
Baylor University
Law School. He carried out a controversial investigation of members of the Clinton administration. Starr served as a federal Court of Appeals judge and as solicitor general for George H. W. Bush. He received the most publicity for his tenure as independent counsel while Bill Clinton
Bill Clinton
was U.S. president. Starr was initially appointed to investigate the suicide death of deputy White House counsel Vince Foster
Vince Foster
and the Whitewater real estate investments of Bill Clinton
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