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Darbari
Darbari Kanada, or simply Raga
Raga
Darbari, (pronounced darbāri kānada), is a raga in the Kanada family, which is thought to have originated in Carnatic music
Carnatic music
and brought into North Indian music by Miyan Tansen, the legendary 16th-century composer in emperor Akbar's court. This tradition is reflected in the name itself; Darbar is the Persian derived word in Hindi
Hindi
meaning "court." As the most familiar raga in the Kanada family, it may sometimes also be called Shuddha Kanada or pure Kanada. It belongs to the Asavari
Asavari
thaat
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Miyan Tansen
Tansen
Tansen
(c. 1506 – 1589), also referred to as Tan Sen or Mian Tansen, was a prominent figure of North Indian (Hindustani) classical music.[3] Born in a Hindu family, he learnt and perfected his art in the northwest region of modern Madhya Pradesh. He was given his name "Tansen" by hindu classical legend Swami Haridas
Swami Haridas
as he was mesmerised by the beauty in his voice. He began his career and spent most of his adult life in the court and patronage of the Hindu king of Rewa (princely state), Raja Ramchandra Singh (r.1555–1592), where Tansen's musical abilities and studies gained widespread fame.[3] This reputation brought him to the attention of the Mughal Emperor Akbar, who sent messengers to Raja Ramchandra Singh, requesting Tansen
Tansen
to join the musicians at the Mughal court
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Chaiti
Chaiti are a semi-classical songs sung in the Hindu calendar
Hindu calendar
month of Chait.[1][2] These songs are rendered during the Holy month of Sri Rama Navami in March/April. It falls under light classical form of Hindustani classical music.[3] The songs typically has the name of Lord Rama. It comes in the series of season songs, like Kajari, Hori and Sawani, and is traditionally sung in the villages and towns of Uttar Pradesh: around Banaras, Mirzapur, Mathura, Allahabad and the Bhojpur regions of Bihar. Girija Devi
Girija Devi
is among the popular singers of Chaiti. References[edit]^ " Thumri queen mesmarises music lovers". Times of India. Retrieved 16 January 2012.  ^ "Documentary Rajan Sajan". Times of India. Retrieved 16 January 2012.  ^ "Life on his own terms". The Hindu
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Dhrupad
Dhrupad
Dhrupad
is a genre in Hindustani classical music. It is the oldest form of compositions in classical music and a form that is also found in the South Indian (Carnatic) tradition.[1][2] It is a Sanskrit name, derived from the words dhruva (immovable, permanent) and pad (verse), a combination that means "pillar"
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Dhamar (music)
Dhamar is one of the talas used in Hindustani classical music. It is associated with the dhrupad style and typically played on the pakhawaj. Dhamar tala has 14 beats (matras) grouped asymmetrically into a 5-2-3-4 pattern. A song in dhrupad style set to dhamar tala is also called a dhamar. The text of a dhamar concerns the antics of Krishna
Krishna
teasing the milkmaids during the Holi
Holi
(hori) Spring Festival of colours
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Khyal
Khyal or Khayal is the modern genre of classical singing in North India. Its name comes from an Arabic word meaning "imagination". It is thought to have developed out of Dhrupad
Dhrupad
introducing frequent taans and alankars in it. It appeared more recently than Dhrupad, is a more free and flexible form, and it provides greater scope for improvisation. Like all Indian classical music, khyal is modal, with a single melodic line and no harmonic parts. The modes are called raga, and each raga is a complicated framework of melodic rules.Contents1 Characteristics 2 History 3 20th-century Khyaliyas 4 References 5 Bibliography 6 External linksCharacteristics[edit] Khyal bases itself on a repertoire of short songs (two to eight lines); a khyal song is called a bandish. Every singer generally renders the same bandish differently, with only the text and the raga remaining the same
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Tarana
Tarana or Taranah is a type of composition in Hindustani classical vocal music in which certain words and syllables (e.g. "odani", "todani", "tadeem" and "yalali") based on Persian and Arabic phonemes[1] are rendered at a medium (madhya) or fast (drut) pace (laya). It was invented by Amir Khusro
Amir Khusro
(1253-1325 CE),[2] and is similar to the Qalbana form of Sufi poetry. In modern times, the tarana is most commonly associated with the singer Amir Khan, who helped popularize it and researched its origins and the syllables used
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Sadra (music)
Sadra is a vocal genre in Hindustani classical music.[1] The Compositions that exist in the metres (tala) teevra (7 beats), sool (10 beats) and chau (12 beats) or 10-beat Jhaptal is called a Sadra. References[edit]^ "A World of Melodies". Retrieved 16 January 2012. v t eHindustani classical musicConceptsSwara That Shruti Raga Sargam Tala Laya Bandish Gharana SwaralipiInstrumentsSitar Sarod Veena Bansuri Santoor Shehnai Sarangi Tanpura Harmonium Tabla PakhavajGenresDhrupad Dhamar Khyal Tarana SadraSemi-classical genresThumri Dadra Tappa Kajari Chaiti Sawani Hori Bhajan Abhang Natyageet Qawwali GhazalThatsBilaval Khamaj Kafi Asavari Bhairav Bhairavi Todi Purvi Marwa KalyanThis article about a music genre is a stub
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Thumri
Thumrī is a common genre of semi-classical Indian music. The term "thumri" is derived from the Hindi
Hindi
verb thumakna, which means "to walk with dancing steps so as to make the ankle-bells tinkle." The form is, thus, connected with dance, dramatic gestures, mild eroticism, evocative love poetry and folk songs of Uttar Pradesh, though there are regional variations.[1] The text is romantic or devotional in nature, and usually revolves around a girl's love for Krishna. The lyrics are usually in Uttar Pradesh dialects of Hindi
Hindi
called Awadhi and Brij Bhasha
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Dadra
Dadra
Dadra
is either of two separate but originally linked concepts in Hindustani classical music.Contents1 Dadra
Dadra
tala 2 Dadra
Dadra
(genre) 3 See also 4 References 5 External links Dadra
Dadra
tala[edit] This is a Hindustani classical tala (rhythmic cycle), consisting of six beats in two equal divisions of three. The most commonly accepted theka or basic pattern for this tala is dha dhi na, dha tu na
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Qawwali
Qawwali
Qawwali
(Nastaʿlīq: قوّالی‬; Hindi:क़व्वाली; Bangla: কাওয়ালি) is a form of Sufi
Sufi
devotional music popular in South Asia: in the Punjab and Sindh
Sindh
regions of Pakistan; in Hyderabad, Delhi
Delhi
and other parts of India, especially North India; as well as Dhaka, Chittagong, Sylhet
Sylhet
and many parts of Bangladesh. It is part of a musical tradition that stretches back for more than 700 years. Originally performed at Sufi
Sufi
shrines or dargahs throughout South Asia, it gained mainstream popularity and International audience in late 20th century
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Ghazal
The ghazal (Urdu: غزَل ‬‎, Hindi: ग़ज़ल, Persian: غزل‎, Pashto: غزل‎, Bengali: ঘজল), a type of amatory poem or ode,[1] originating in Arabic poetry.Contents1 History 2 Pronunciation 3 Themes3.1 Unconditional, superior love 3.2 Sufism4 Important poets of Persian Ghazal 5 Translations and performance of classical Ghazal 6 Popularity 7 In English7.1 Notable poets who composed Ghazals8 Ghazal
Ghazal
singers 9 See also 10 Footnotes 11 References 12 External linksHistory[edit] The ghazal originated in Arabia in the 7th century[2] and later spread throughout the Middle East and South Asia. It was famous all around the Indian subcontinent
Indian subcontinent
in the 18th and 19th centuries[unreliable source?]
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Kajri
Kajri derived from the Hindi
Hindi
word Kajra, or Kohl, is a genre of semi-classical singing, popular in Uttar Pradesh
Uttar Pradesh
and Bihar.[1] It is often used to describe the longing of a maiden for her lover as the
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Tanpura
The tanpura (तानपूरा; or tambura, tanpuri) is a long-necked plucked string instrument found in various forms in Indian music. It does not play melody but rather supports and sustains the melody of another instrument or singer by providing a continuous harmonic bourdon or drone. A tanpura is not played in rhythm with the soloist or percussionist: as the precise timing of plucking a cycle of four strings in a continuous loop is a determinant factor in the resultant sound, it is played unchangingly during the complete performance. The repeated cycle of plucking all strings creates the sonic canvas on which the melody of the raga is drawn
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Bilaval
Bilawal is a raga and basic thaat (musical mode) in Hindustani classical music. It is equivalent to the Carnatic melakarta raga Dheerasankarabharanam, as well as the Western Ionian mode (major scale) and contains the notes S R G m P D N S' (see swara for explanation). The pitches of Bilawal thaat are all shuddha, or natural. Flat (komal) or sharp (tivra) of pitches always occurs with reference to the interval pattern in Bilawal thaat. The Indian national anthem Jana gana mana
Jana gana mana
is sung in raag Bilawal. Raga
Raga
Bilaval is named after Veraval, Gujarat.[1] It is one of the ragas that appears in the Sikh
Sikh
tradition from northern India, and is part of the Sikh
Sikh
holy scripture (Granth), the Sri Guru Granth Sahib
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Khamaj
Pa Dha Ma Ga Re Sa Ni Dha Ma Pa Dha Ma Ga Ma Pa Dha Ga Ma Re Sa Ni Dha Ma Pa Dha Ma GaVaadi GaSamvaadi NiPrahar (Time) Evening (Pratham Prahar) Khamaj (Devanagari:खमाज,Urdu: کھماج‬‎, Bengali: খাম্বাজ ) is one of the ten Thaats (parent scales) of Hindustani music. It is also a specific raga within the Khamaj thaat. Many ghazals and thumris are based on Khamaj. It utilizes the shuddha (pure) form of Ni on the ascent, and the komala (flat) form of Ni on the descent, creating a key asymmetry in compositional and improvisational performance.Contents1 Khamaj Thaat 2 Raga
Raga
Khamaj 3 References 4 External links Khamaj Thaat[edit] The parent-scale or Thaat
Thaat
of Khamaj, notated in sargam notation, has the following structure: Sa Re Ga Ma Pa Dha Ni Sa. In Western terms, assuming the tonic (Sa) to be at C, the scale would be: C D E F G A B-flat C
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