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Daniel Kahneman
Daniel Kahneman (/ˈkɑːnəmən/; Hebrew: דניאל כהנמן‎, born March 5, 1934) is an Israeli-American psychologist notable for his work on the psychology of judgment and decision-making, as well as behavioral economics, for which he was awarded the 2002 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences (shared with Vernon L. Smith)
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Tel Aviv
Tel Aviv
Tel Aviv
(Hebrew: תֵּל אָבִיב‬, [tel aˈviv], Arabic: تل أَبيب‎) is the second most populous city in Israel
Israel
– after Jerusalem
Jerusalem
– and the most populous city in the conurbation of Gush Dan, Israel's largest metropolitan area. Located on the country's Mediterranean coastline and with a population of 438,818, it is the financial and technological center of the country
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Judgment
Judgment (or judgement)[1] is the evaluation of evidence to make a decision.[2][3][4] The term has four distinct uses:Informal – opinions expressed as facts. Informal and psychological – used in reference to the quality of cognitive faculties and adjudicational capabilities of particular individuals, typically called wisdom or discernment. Legal – used in the context of legal trial, to refer to a final finding, statement, or ruling, based on a considered weighing of evidence, called, "adjudication". See spelling note for further explanation. Religious – used in the concept of salvation to refer to the adjudication of God in determining Heaven
Heaven
or Hell
Hell
for each and all human beings
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Mandatory Palestine
Mandatory Palestine[1] (Arabic: فلسطين‎ Filasṭīn; Hebrew: פָּלֶשְׂתִּינָה (א"י)‬ Pālēśtīnā (EY), where "EY" indicates "Eretz Yisrael", Land of Israel) was a geopolitical entity under British administration, carved out of Ottoman Southern Syria after World War I. British civil administration in Palestine operated from 1920 until 1948
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Thesis
A thesis or dissertation[1] is a document submitted in support of candidature for an academic degree or professional qualification presenting the author's research and findings.[2] In some contexts, the word "thesis" or a cognate is used for part of a bachelor's or master's course, while "dissertation" is normally applied to a doctorate, while in other contexts, the reverse is true.[3] The term graduate thesis is sometimes used to refer to both master's theses and doctoral dissertations.[4] The required complexity or quality of research of a thesis or dissertation can vary by country, university, or program, and the required minimum study period may thus vary significantly in duration. The word "dissertation" can at times be used to describe a treatise without relation to obtaining an academic degree
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Doctoral Advisor
A doctoral advisor (also dissertation director or dissertation advisor) is a member of a university faculty whose role is to guide graduate students who are candidates for a doctorate, helping them select coursework, as well as shaping, refining and directing the students' choice of sub-discipline in which they will be examined or on which they will write a dissertation.[1] Students generally choose advisors based on their areas of interest within their discipline, their desire to work closely with particular graduate faculty, and the willingness and availability of those faculty to work with them. In some countries, the student's advisor serves as the chair of the doctoral examination or dissertation committees. In some cases, though, the person who serves those roles may be different from the faculty member who has most closely advised the student
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Desert Island Discs
Desert Island Discs
Desert Island Discs
is a radio programme broadcast on BBC
BBC
Radio 4. It was first broadcast on the BBC Forces Programme
BBC Forces Programme
on 29 January 1942.[1] Each week a guest, called a 'castaway' during the programme, is asked to choose eight recordings (usually, but not always, music), a book and a luxury item that they would take if they were to be cast away on a desert island, whilst discussing their lives and the reasons for their choices
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Hebrew Language
Hebrew (/ˈhiːbruː/; עִבְרִית, Ivrit [ʔivˈʁit] ( listen) or [ʕivˈɾit] ( listen)) is a Northwest Semitic language native to Israel, spoken by over 9 million people worldwide.[8][9] Historically, it is regarded as the language of the Israelites
Israelites
and their ancestors, although the language was not referred to by the name Hebrew in the Tanakh.[note 1] The earliest examples of written Paleo-Hebrew date from the 10th century BCE.[10] Hebrew belongs to the West Semitic branch of the Afroasiatic language family
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Israeli American
Israeli Americans
Americans
(Hebrew: אָמֵרִיקאים יִשׂרָאֵלים‎ lit. Ameriqaim Yisra'elim) are Americans
Americans
who have Israeli citizenship either by descent or naturalization.Contents1 History 2 Demographics2.1 By generations 2.2 By state3 Culture and organizations 4 Economic contributions 5 Relationship with American Jews 6 Notable people 7 In popular culture 8 See also 9 ReferencesHistory[edit] Israelis
Israelis
began migrating to the United States
United States
shortly after the founding of the state of Israel
Israel
in 1948
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Cognitive
Cognition
Cognition
is "the mental action or process of acquiring knowledge and understanding through thought, experience, and the senses".[1] It encompasses processes such as knowledge, attention, memory and working memory, judgment and evaluation, reasoning and "computation", problem solving and decision making, comprehension and production of language. Human
Human
cognition is conscious and unconscious, concrete or abstract, as well as intuitive (like knowledge of a language) and conceptual (like a model of a language)
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University Of Louisville
The University
University
of Louisville (UofL) is a public university in Louisville, Kentucky, a member of the Kentucky
Kentucky
state university system. When founded in 1798, it was the first city-owned public university in the United States and one of the first universities chartered west of the Allegheny Mountains. The university is mandated by the Kentucky
Kentucky
General Assembly to be a "Preeminent Metropolitan Research University".[6] UofL enrolls students from 118 of 120 Kentucky
Kentucky
counties,[7] all 50 U.S
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Paul Slovic
Paul Slovic
Paul Slovic
(born 1938 in Chicago) is a professor of psychology at the University of Oregon
University of Oregon
and the president of Decision Research. Decision Research is a collection of scientists from all over the nation and in other countries that study decision-making in times when risks are involved. He was also the president for the Society of Risk
Risk
Analysis until 1984. He earned his undergraduate degree at Stanford University in 1959 and his Ph.D. in psychology at the University of Michigan
University of Michigan
in 1964 and has received honorary doctorates from the Stockholm School of Economics and the University of East Anglia.[1] He is past president of the Society for Risk
Risk
Analysis and in 1991 received its Distinguished Contribution Award
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Foreign Policy
A country's foreign policy, also called foreign relations or foreign affairs policy, consists of self-interest strategies chosen by the state to safeguard its national interests and to achieve goals within its international relations milieu. The approaches are strategically employed to interact with other countries. The study of such strategies is called foreign policy analysis. In recent times, due to the deepening level of globalization and transnational activities, the states will also have to interact with non-state actors. The aforementioned interaction is evaluated and monitored in attempts to maximize benefits of multilateral international cooperation. Since the national interests are paramount, foreign policies are designed by the government through high-level decision making processes. National interests accomplishment can occur as a result of peaceful cooperation with other nations, or through exploitation
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Royal Society
The President, Council and Fellows of the Royal Society
Royal Society
of London for Improving Natural Knowledge,[1] commonly known as the Royal Society, is a learned society. Founded in November 1660, it was granted a royal charter by King Charles II as "The Royal Society".[1] It is the oldest national scientific institution in the world.[2] The society is the United Kingdom's and Commonwealth of Nations' Academy of Sciences
Academy of Sciences
and fulfils a number of roles: promoting science and its benefits, recognising excellence in science, supporting outstanding science, providing scientific advice for policy, fostering international and global co-operation, education and public engagement. The society is governed by its Council, which is chaired by the Society's President, according to a set of statutes and standing orders
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The Economist
The Economist
Economist
is an English-language
English-language
weekly magazine-format newspaper owned by the Economist
Economist
Group and edited at offices in London.[2][6][7][8] Continuous publication began under its founder, James Wilson, in September 1843. In 2015 its average weekly circulation was a little over 1.5 million, about half of which were sold in the United States.[5][2]The publication belongs to the Economist
Economist
Group. It is 50% owned by the English branch of the Rothschild family
Rothschild family
and by the Agnelli family through its holding company Exor. The remaining 50% is held by private investors including the editors and staff.[9][10] The Rothschilds and the Agnellis are represented on the board of directors.[11] A board of trustees formally appoints the editor, who cannot be removed without its permission
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Paris
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Paris
Paris
(French pronunciation: ​[paʁi] ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city in France, with an administrative-limits area of 105 square kilometres (41 square miles) and an official population of 2,206,488 (2015).[5] The city is a commune and department, and the heart of the 12,012-square-kilometre (4,638-square-mile) Île-de-
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