HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

picture info

Daniel Heinsius
Daniel Heinsius
Daniel Heinsius
(or Heins) (9 June 1580 – 25 February 1655) was one of the most famous scholars of the Dutch Renaissance.Contents1 His youth and student years 2 Professor at Leiden
Leiden
University 3 Latin poetry 4 Dutch poetry 5 His later years 6 See also 7 Notes 8 ReferencesHis youth and student years[edit] Heinsius was born in Ghent. The troubles of the Spanish war drove his parents to settle first at Veere in Zeeland, then to England, next at Rijwijk and lastly at Vlissingen. In 1596, being already remarkable for his attainments, he was sent to the University of Franeker
University of Franeker
to study law under Henricus Schotanus. In 1598 he settled at Leiden
Leiden
for the nearly sixty remaining years of his life
[...More...]

picture info

Dutch Renaissance
The Renaissance
Renaissance
(UK: /rɪˈneɪsəns/, US: /rɛnəˈsɑːns/)[1] is a period in European history, covering the span between the 14th and 17th centuries. It is an extension of the Middle Ages, and is bridged by the Age of Enlightenment
Age of Enlightenment
to modern history. It grew in fragments, with the very first traces found seemingly in Italy, coming to cover much of Europe, for some scholars marking the beginning of the modern age. The intellectual basis of the Renaissance
Renaissance
was its own invented version of humanism, derived from the concept of Roman Humanitas and the rediscovery of classical Greek philosophy, such as that of Protagoras, who said that "Man is the measure of all things." This new thinking became manifest in art, architecture, politics, science and literature
[...More...]

picture info

Moschus
Moschus
Moschus
(Greek: Μόσχος), ancient Greek bucolic poet and student of the Alexandrian grammarian Aristarchus of Samothrace, was born at Syracuse and flourished about 150 BC. Aside from his poetry, he was known for his grammatical work, nothing of which survives. His few surviving works consist of an epyllion, the Europa, on the myth of Europa, three bucolic fragments and a whole short bucolic poem Runaway Love, and an epigram in elegiac couplets. His surviving bucolic material (composed in the traditional dactylic hexameters and Doric dialect) is short on pastoral themes and is largely erotic and mythological; although this impression may be distorted by the paucity of evidence, it is also seen in the surviving bucolic of the generations after Moschus, including the work of Bion of Smyrna. Moschus' poetry is typically edited along with other bucolic poets, as in the commonly used Oxford text by A. S. F
[...More...]

picture info

Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially-based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names. The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
prepared cards of bibliographic information for their library catalog and would sell duplicate sets of the cards to other libraries for use in their catalogs
[...More...]

picture info

The Hague
The Hague
The Hague
(/ðə ˈheɪɡ/; Dutch: Den Haag, pronounced [dɛn ˈɦaːx] ( listen), short for 's-Gravenhage; [ˈsxraːvə(n)ˌɦaːɣə] ( listen)) is a city on the western coast of the Netherlands
Netherlands
and the capital of the province of South Holland. With a metropolitan population of more than 1 million, it is the third-largest city in the Netherlands, after Amsterdam
Amsterdam
and Rotterdam. The Rotterdam– The Hague
The Hague
metropolitan area, with a population of approximately 2.7 million, is the 12th-largest in the European Union and the most populous in the country
[...More...]

International Standard Name Identifier
The International Standard Name Identifier (ISNI) is an identifier for uniquely identifying the public identities of contributors to media content such as books, television programmes, and newspaper articles. Such an identifier consists of 16 digits. It can optionally be displayed as divided into four blocks. ISNI can be used to disambiguate names that might otherwise be confused, and links the data about names that are collected and used in all sectors of the media industries. It was developed under the auspices of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) as Draft International Standard 27729; the valid standard was published on 15 March 2012
[...More...]

picture info

New Testament
The New Testament
New Testament
(Greek: Ἡ Καινὴ Διαθήκη, Hē Kainḕ Diathḗkē; Latin: Novum Testamentum) is the second part of the Christian biblical canon, the first part being the Old Testament, based on the Hebrew Bible. The New Testament
New Testament
discusses the teachings and person of Jesus, as well as events in first-century Christianity. Christians
Christians
regard both the Old and New Testaments together as sacred scripture. The New Testament
New Testament
(in whole or in part) has frequently accompanied the spread of Christianity
Christianity
around the world. It reflects and serves as a source for Christian theology
Christian theology
and morality
[...More...]

picture info

States General Of The Netherlands
Government (38)     VVD (13)      CDA (12)      D66 (10)      CU (3)Opposition (37)     PVV (9)      SP (9)      PvdA (8)      GL (4)      PvdD (2)      SGP (2)      50+ (2)      OSF (1)House of Representatives political groupsGovernment (76)[1]     VVD (33)      CDA (19)      D66 (19)      CU (5)Opposition parties (74)     PVV (20)      GL (14)      SP (14)      PvdA (9)      PvdD (5)      50+ (4)      SGP (3)      DENK (3)      FvD (2)


[...More...]

picture info

Synod Of Dort
The Synod
Synod
of Dort (also known as the Synod
Synod
of Dordt or the Synod
Synod
of Dordrecht) was an international Synod
Synod
held in Dordrecht
Dordrecht
in 1618–1619, by the Dutch Reformed
Reformed
Church, to settle a divisive controversy initiated by the rise of Arminianism. The first meeting was on 13 November 1618 and the final meeting, the 154th, was on 9 May 1619. Voting representatives from eight foreign Reformed churches
Reformed churches
were also invited
[...More...]

LIBRIS
LIBRIS (Library Information System) is a Swedish national union catalogue maintained by the National Library of Sweden
Sweden
in Stockholm.[1] It is possible to freely search about 6.5 million titles nationwide.[2] In addition to bibliographic records, one for each book or publication, LIBRIS also contains an authority file of people
[...More...]

picture info

Système Universitaire De Documentation
The système universitaire de documentation or SUDOC is a system used by the libraries of French universities and higher education establishments to identify, track and manage the documents in their possession. The catalog, which contains more than 10 million references, allows students and researchers to search for bibliographical and location information in over 3,400 documentation centers. It is maintained by the Bibliographic Agency for Higher Education [fr] (ABES).External links[edit] Official website This article relating to library science or information science is a stub
[...More...]

picture info

Bibliothèque Nationale De France
The Bibliothèque nationale de France
France
(BnF, English: National Library of France; French: [bi.bli.jɔ.tɛk na.sjɔ.nal də fʁɑ̃s]) is the national library of France, located in Paris. It is the national repository of all that is published in France
France
and also holds extensive historical collections.Contents1 History 2 New buildings 3 Mission 4 Manuscript
Manuscript
collection 5 Digital library 6 List of directors6.1 1369–1792 6.2 1792–present7 Films about the library 8 Famous patrons 9 See also 10 References 11 Further reading 12 External linksHistory[edit] The National Library of France
France
traces its origin to the royal library founded at the Louvre Palace
Louvre Palace
by Charles V in 1368
[...More...]

picture info

Biografisch Portaal
The Biografisch Portaal
Biografisch Portaal
(Biography Portal) is an initiative based at the Huygens Institute for Dutch History in The Hague, with the aim of making biographical texts of the Netherlands more accessible. The project was started in February 2010 with material for 40,000 digitized biographies, with the goal to grant digital access to all reliable information about (deceased) people of the Netherlands from the earliest beginnings of history up to modern times.[1] The Netherlands as a geographic term includes former colonies, and the term "people" refers both to people born in the Netherlands and its former colonies, and also to people born elsewhere but active in the Netherlands and its former colonies. As of 2011[update], only biographical information about deceased people is included. The system used is based on the standards of the Text Encoding Initiative
[...More...]

picture info

National Library Of Australia
The National Library of Australia
Australia
(NLA) is the largest reference library in Australia, responsible under the terms of the National Library Act for "maintaining and developing a national collection of library material, including a comprehensive collection of library material relating to Australia
[...More...]

Terentius
The gens Terentia was a plebeian family at ancient Rome. Dionysius mentions a Gaius Terentilius Arsa, tribune of the plebs in 462 BC, but Livy calls him Terentilius, and from inscriptions this would seem to be a separate gens.[1][2] No other Terentii appear in history until the time of the Second Punic War. Gaius Terentius Varro, one of the Roman commanders at the Battle of Cannae in 216 BC, was the first to hold the consulship
[...More...]

picture info

National Diet Library
The National Diet
National Diet
Library (NDL) (国立国会図書館, Kokuritsu Kokkai Toshokan) is the national library of Japan
Japan
and among the largest libraries in the world. It was established in 1948 for the purpose of assisting members of the National Diet
National Diet
of Japan (国会, Kokkai) in researching matters of public policy
[...More...]

.