HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Damnation
Damnation (from Latin damnatio) is the concept of divine punishment and torment in an afterlife for actions that were committed on Earth. In Ancient Egyptian religious tradition, citizens would recite the 42 negative confessions of Maat
Maat
as their heart was weighed against the feather of truth. If the citizen's heart was heavier than a feather they would be devoured by Ammit. Zoroastrianism developed an eschatological concept of a Last Judgment called Frashokereti where the dead will be raised and the righteous wade through a river of milk while the wicked will be burned in a river of molten metal. Abrahamic religions such as Christianity have similar concepts of believers facing judgement on a last day to determine if they will spend eternity in Gehenna
Gehenna
or heaven for their sin [Mark 3:29]
[...More...]

"Damnation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Minced Oath
A minced oath is a euphemistic expression formed by misspelling, mispronouncing, or replacing a part of a profane, blasphemous, or taboo term to reduce the original term's objectionable characteristics. Some examples include "gosh" (for God),[1] "darn" (for damn)[citation needed], "heck" (for hell),[2] and "fudge" (for fuck).[3] Many languages have such expressions
[...More...]

"Minced Oath" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Oriental Orthodoxy
Oriental Orthodoxy[a] is the fourth largest communion of Christian churches, with about 76 million members worldwide. As one of the oldest religious institutions in the world, it has played a prominent role in the history and culture of Armenia, Egypt, Ethiopia, Sudan
Sudan
and parts of the Middle East
Middle East
and India
[...More...]

"Oriental Orthodoxy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Protestant
Protestantism
Protestantism
is the second largest form of Christianity
Christianity
with collectively more than 900 million adherents worldwide or nearly 40% of all Christians.[1][2][3][a] It or
[...More...]

"Protestant" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Book Of Genesis
The Book
Book
of Genesis (from the Latin Vulgate, in turn borrowed or transliterated from Greek γένεσις, meaning "Origin"; Hebrew: בְּרֵאשִׁית‬, Bərēšīṯ, "In [the] beginning") is the first book of the Hebrew Bible
[...More...]

"Book Of Genesis" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ten Commandments
The Ten
The Ten
Commandments, also known as the Decalogue, are a set of biblical laws relating to ethics and worship, which play a fundamental role in Judaism
Judaism
and Christianity. The commandments include instructions to worship only God, to honour one's parents, and to keep the sabbath, as well as prohibitions against idolatry, blasphemy, murder, adultery, theft, dishonesty, and coveting. Different religious groups follow different traditions for interpreting and numbering them. The Ten
The Ten
Commandments appear twice in the Hebrew Bible, in the books of Exodus and Deuteronomy
[...More...]

"Ten Commandments" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Soteriology
Soteriology
Soteriology
(/səˌtɪəriˈɒlədʒi/; Greek: σωτηρία sōtēria "salvation" from σωτήρ sōtēr "savior, preserver" and λόγος logos "study" or "word"[1]) is the study of religious doctrines of salvation. Salvation
Salvation
theory occupies a place of special significance in many religions. In the academic field of religious studies, soteriology is understood by scholars as representing a key theme in a number of different religions and is often studied in a comparative context; that is, comparing various ideas about what salvation is and how it is obtained.Contents1 Buddhism 2 Christianity 3 Hinduism 4 Islam 5 Jainism 6 Judaism 7 Mystery religions 8 Sikhism 9 Other religions 10 See also 11 References 12 Further readingBuddhism[edit] Main article: NirvanaThis section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it
[...More...]

"Soteriology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Jesus
Jesus[e] (c. 4 BC – c. AD 30 / 33), also referred to as Jesus
Jesus
of Nazareth
Nazareth
and Jesus
Jesus
Christ,[f] was a first-century Jewish preacher and religious leader.[12] He is the central figure of Christianity
[...More...]

"Jesus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Book Of Revelation
The Book
Book
of Revelation, often called the Revelation to John, the Apocalypse
Apocalypse
of John, The Revelation, or simply Revelation or Apocalypse (and often misquoted as Revelations), is a book of the New Testament that occupies a central place in Christian eschatology. Its title is derived from the first word of the text, written in Koine Greek: apokalypsis, meaning "unveiling" or "revelation" (before title pages and titles, books were commonly known by their first words, as is also the case of the Hebrew Five Books of Moses
Five Books of Moses
(Torah)). The Book
Book
of Revelation is the only apocalyptic document in the New Testament
New Testament
canon (although there are short apocalyptic passages in various places in the Gospels and the Epistles).[a] The author names himself in the text as "John", but his precise identity remains a point of academic debate
[...More...]

"Book Of Revelation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Lake Of Fire
A lake of fire appears, in both ancient Egyptian and Christian religion, as a place of after-death destruction of the wicked. The phrase is used in four verses of the Book of Revelation. Such a lake also appears in Plato's Phaedo, explicitly identified with Tartarus, where the souls of the wicked are tormented until it is time for them to be reborn, and where some souls are left forever. The image was also used by the Early Christian
Christian
Hippolytus of Rome
Hippolytus of Rome
in about the year 200 and has continued to be used by modern Christians
[...More...]

"Lake Of Fire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Eastern Orthodoxy
The Eastern Orthodox
Eastern Orthodox
Church,[1] also known as the Orthodox Church,[2] or officially as the Orthodox Catholic Church,[3] is the second-largest Christian Church, with over 250 million members.[4][5] As one of the oldest religious institutions in the world, it has played a prominent role in the history and culture of Eastern Europe,
[...More...]

"Eastern Orthodoxy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Jesus Christ
Jesus[e] (c. 4 BC – c. AD 30 / 33), also referred to as Jesus
Jesus
of Nazareth
Nazareth
and Jesus
Jesus
Christ,[f] was a first-century Jewish preacher and religious leader.[12] He is the central figure of Christianity
[...More...]

"Jesus Christ" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Western Christianity
Western Christianity
Christianity
is the type of Christianity
Christianity
which developed in the areas of the former Western Roman Empire.[1] Western Christianity consists of the Latin Rite
Latin Rite
of the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
(in contrast to the Eastern rites in communion with Rome) and a wide variety of Protestant denominations. The name "Western Christianity" is applied in order to distinguish these from Eastern Christianity. With the expansion of European colonialism from the Early Modern era, Western Christianity
Christianity
spread throughout the Americas, much of the Philippines, Southern Africa, pockets of West Africa, and throughout Australia
Australia
and New Zealand
[...More...]

"Western Christianity" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mediation
Mediation
Mediation
is a dynamic, structured, interactive process where a neutral third party assists disputing parties in resolving conflict through the use of specialized communication and negotiation techniques. All participants in mediation are encouraged to actively participate in the process. Mediation
Mediation
is a "party-centered" process in that it is focused primarily upon the needs, rights, and interests of the parties. The mediator uses a wide variety of techniques to guide the process in a constructive direction and to help the parties find their optimal solution. A mediator is facilitative in that she/he manages the interaction between parties and facilitates open communication. Mediation
Mediation
is also evaluative in that the mediator analyzes issues and relevant norms ("reality-testing"), while refraining from providing prescriptive advice to the parties (e.g., "You should do..
[...More...]

"Mediation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Isaac Of Nineveh
Isaac of Nineveh
Nineveh
(Syriac: ܡܪܝ ܐܝܣܚܩ ܕܢܝܢܘ‎; Arabic: إسحاق النينوي Ishak an-Naynuwī; Greek: Ἰσαὰκ Σύρος; c. 613 – c. 700) also remembered as Saint
Saint
Isaac the Syrian,[4][5] Abba Isaac, Isaac Syrus and Isaac of Qatar[6] was a 7th-century Church of the East
Church of the East
Syriac Christian bishop and theologian best remembered for his written works on Christian asceticism. He is regarded as a saint in the (non-Ephesine) Assyrian Church of the East. In the Eastern Orthodox tradition, his feast day falls, together with 4th-century theologian and hymnographer St
[...More...]

"Isaac Of Nineveh" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Basil Of Caesarea
Basil of Caesarea, also called Saint
Saint
Basil the Great (Greek: Ἅγιος Βασίλειος ὁ Μέγας, Ágios Basíleios o Mégas, Coptic: Ⲡⲓⲁⲅⲓⲟⲥ Ⲃⲁⲥⲓⲗⲓⲟⲥ; 329 or 330[8] – January 1 or 2, 379), was the Greek bishop of Caesarea Mazaca in Cappadocia, Asia Minor
Asia Minor
(modern-day Turkey). He was an influential theologian who supported the Nicene Creed
Nicene Creed
and opposed the heresies of the early Christian church, fighting against both Arianism and the followers of Apollinaris of Laodicea. His ability to balance his theological convictions with his political connections made Basil a powerful advocate for the Nicene
Nicene
position. In addition to his work as a theologian, Basil was known for his care of the poor and underprivileged. Basil established guidelines for monastic life which focus on community life, liturgical prayer, and manual labour
[...More...]

"Basil Of Caesarea" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.