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Daishō-in
Daishō-in
Daishō-in
or Daisyō-in (大聖院) is a historic Japanese temple complex with many temples and statues on Mount Misen, the holy mountain on the island of Itsukushima, off the coast of Hatsukaichi, Hiroshima, Japan. It is the 14th temple in the Chūgoku 33 Kannon Pilgrimage and famous for the maple trees and their autumn colors. It is also called "Suishō-ji" (水精寺). Including Mt
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Niōmon
The niōmon (仁王門, lit. Niō
Niō
gate) is the Japanese name of a Buddhist temple gate guarded by two wooden warriors called Niō
Niō
(lit. Two Kings). The gate is called Heng Ha Er Jiang (哼哈二将) in China and Geumgangmun (金剛門) in Korea.[citation needed] The two statues are inside the two posts of the gate itself, one at the left, one at the right. Structurally, it usually is either a rōmon or a nijūmon and can measure either 5x2 or 3x2 bays.[1] It can sometimes have just one story, as in the case of Asakusa's Kaminarimon.[citation needed] In a five-bay gate, the figures of the two Niō
Niō
are usually enshrined in the two outer bays, but can be sometimes found also in the inner ones.[1] The statue on the right is called Naraen Kongō (那羅延金剛) and has his mouth open to utter the first letter of the Sanskrit alphabet, which is pronounced "a"
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Nakazonae
Nakazonae
Nakazonae
(中備・中具) are decorative intercolumnar struts installed in the intervals between bracket complexes (tokyō) at Buddhist temples and Shinto shrines in Japan.[1] In origin they were necessary to help support the roof; however, at the end of the 10th century the invention of the hidden roof[note 1] made them superfluous.[2] They remained in use, albeit in a purely decorative role, and are typical of the Wayō
Wayō
style. The Zenshūyō style used by Zen
Zen
temples has instead bracket complexes even between posts.Contents1 Kentozuka1.1 Minozuka2 Hana-hijiki 3 Warizuka 4 Kaerumata 5 Types of nakazonae 6 Notes 7 ReferencesKentozuka[edit] The simplest of these struts are the kentozuka (間斗束, lit. interval block strut, see photo above) composed of a short post and a bearing block.[3] Minozuka[edit] Similar to the kentozuka is the fan-shaped strut called minozuka (蓑束, lit
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Shinto
Shinto
Shinto
(神道, Shintō) or kami-no-michi (among other names)[note 1] is the traditional religion of Japan
Japan
that focuses on ritual practices to be carried out diligently to establish
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Glossary Of Japanese Buddhism
This is the glossary of Japanese Buddhism, including major terms the casual (or brand-new) reader might find useful in understanding articles on the subject. Words followed by an asterisk (*) are illustrated by an image in one of the photo galleries
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Buddhist Temples In Japan
Buddhist temples are, together with Shinto shrines, considered to be among the most numerous, famous, and important religious buildings in Japan.[note 1] The Japanese word for a Buddhist temple
Buddhist temple
is tera (寺), and the same kanji also has the pronunciation ji, so that temple names frequently end in -dera or -ji. Another ending, -in (院), is normally used to refer to minor temples
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Japanese Buddhist Architecture
Japanese Buddhist architecture
Japanese Buddhist architecture
is the architecture of Buddhist temples in Japan, consisting of locally developed variants of architectural styles born in China.[1] After Buddhism
Buddhism
arrived the continent via Three Kingdoms of Korea
Three Kingdoms of Korea
in the 6th century, an effort was initially made to reproduce original buildings as faithfully as possible, but gradually local versions of continental styles were developed both to meet Japanese tastes and to solve problems posed by local weather, which is more rainy and humid than in China.[2] The first Buddhist sects were Nara's six Nanto Rokushū (南都六宗, Nara six sects),[nb 1] followed during the Heian period
Heian period
by Kyoto's Shingon
Shingon
and Tendai
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Hidden Roof
The hidden roof (野屋根, noyane)[note 1] is a type of roof widely used in Japan both at Buddhist temples and Shinto shrines. It is composed of a true roof above and a second roof beneath,[1] permitting an outer roof of steep pitch to have eaves of shallow pitch, jutting widely from the walls but without overhanging them.[2] The second roof is visible only from under the eaves and is therefore called a "hidden roof" (giving its name to the whole structure) while the first roof is externally visible and is called an "exposed roof" in English and "cosmetic roof" (化粧屋根, keshōyane) in Japanese
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Hisashi (architecture)
In Japanese architecture
Japanese architecture
the term hisashi (廂・庇) has two meanings:As more commonly used, the term indicates the eaves of a roof,[1] that is, the part along the edge of a roof projecting beyond the side of the building to provide protection against the weather. The term is however also used in a more specialized sense to indicate the area surrounding the moya (the core of a building) either completely or on one, two, or three sides.[1]It is common in Zen
Zen
Buddhist temples where it is a 1 ken wide aisle-like area and at the same level as the moya
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East Asian Hip-and-gable Roof
Asian may refer to:Items from or related to the continent of Asia: Asian people, people who descend from Asia Asian culture, the culture of the people from Asia Asian cuisine, food based on the style of food of the people from Asia
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Kairō
The kairō (回廊 or 廻廊), bu (廡), sōrō or horō (歩廊) is the Japanese version of a cloister, a covered corridor originally built around the most sacred area of a Buddhist temple, a zone which contained the Kondō and the pagoda. Nowadays it can be found also at Shinto shrines and at shinden-zukuri aristocratic residences.[1] The kairō and the rōmon were among the most important among the garan elements which appeared during the Heian period.[2] The first surrounded the holiest part of the garan, while the second was its main exit. Neither was originally characteristic of Shinto shrines, but in time they often came to replace the traditional shrine surrounding fence called tamagaki.[2] The earliest example of a kairō/rōmon complex can be found at Iwashimizu Hachiman-gū, a shrine now but a former shrine-temple (神宮寺).[3] The rōmon is believed to have been built in 886, and the kairō roughly at the same time
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Shinbutsu Bunri
The Japanese term shinbutsu bunri (神仏分離) indicates the separation of Shinto from Buddhism, introduced after the Meiji Restoration which separated Shinto kami from buddhas, and also Buddhist temples from Shinto shrines, which were originally amalgamated.Contents1 Background before 1868 2 Policy of the Meiji government 3 Details of the policy 4 Consequences of the policy 5 Haibutsu kishaku 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksBackground before 1868[edit] Until the end of the Edo period, in 1868, Shinto and Buddhism
Buddhism
were intimately connected in what was called shinbutsu-shūgō (神仏習合), to the point that the same buildings were often used as both Shinto shrines and Buddhist temples, and Shinto gods were interpreted as manifestations of Buddhas
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Karahafu
The karahafu (kara-hafu) (唐破風) is a type of gable with a style peculiar to Japan. The characteristic shape is the undulating curve at the top. This gable is common in traditional architecture, including Japanese castles, Buddhist temples, and Shinto shrines. Roofing materials such as tile and bark may be used as coverings. The face beneath the gable may be flush with the wall below, or it may terminate on a lower roof.Contents1 History 2 Images 3 See also 4 Notes 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] Although kara (唐) can be translated as meaning "China" or "Tang", this type of roof with undulating bargeboards is an invention of Japanese carpenters in the late Heian period.[1] It was named thus because the word kara could also mean "noble" or "elegant", and was often added to names of objects considered grand or intricate regardless of origin.[2] The karahafu developed during the Heian period and is shown in picture scrolls to decorate gates, corridors, and palanquins
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