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Dairy Queen
[1] Not to be confused with Milk Queen.Dairy Queen Dairy Queen
Dairy Queen
in Key West, FloridaTypeSubsidiaryIndustry RestaurantGenre Fast foodFounded June 22, 1940; 77 years ago (1940-06-22) in Joliet, Illinois, United StatesFounder John Fremont McCulloughHeadquarters Edina, Minnesota, United StatesNumber of locations6,400 (US domestic, 2014)Area servedGlobalKey peopleWarren Buffett Clayton Lundine John Gainor (CEO) Troy Bader (COO) Mark Vinton (CFO) Barry Westrum (EVP Marketing)Products Soft serve, fast food, ic
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Coca-Cola
Coca-Cola, or Coke, is a carbonated soft drink[1] produced by The Coca- Cola
Cola
Company. Originally intended as a patent medicine, it was invented in the late 19th century by John Pemberton
John Pemberton
and was bought out by businessman Asa Griggs Candler, whose marketing tactics led Coca- Cola
Cola
to its dominance of the world soft-drink market throughout the 20th century. The drink's name refers to two of its original ingredients, which were kola nuts (a source of caffeine) and coca leaves. The current formula of Coca- Cola
Cola
remains a trade secret, although a variety of reported recipes and experimental recreations have been published. The Coca-Cola Company
The Coca-Cola Company
produces concentrate, which is then sold to licensed Coca- Cola
Cola
bottlers throughout the world
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Moncton
Moncton
Moncton
(/ˈmʌŋktən/; French pronunciation: ​[mɔŋktœn]) is the largest city in the Canadian province of New Brunswick. Situated in the Petitcodiac River
Petitcodiac River
Valley, Moncton
Moncton
lies at the geographic centre of the Maritime Provinces. The city has earned the nickname "Hub City" due to its central inland location in the region and its history as a railway and land transportation hub for the Maritimes. The city proper has a population of 71,889 (2016) and has a land area of 142 km2 (55 sq mi). The Moncton
Moncton
CMA has a population of 144,810 (2016), making it the largest city[8] and CMA in New Brunswick, and the second-largest city and CMA in the Maritime Provinces
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Franchising
Franchising
Franchising
is based on a marketing concept which can be adopted by an organisation as a strategy for business expansion. Where implemented, a franchiser licenses its know-how, procedures, intellectual property, use of its business model, brand; and rights to sell its branded products and services to a franchisee. In return the franchisee pays certain fees and agrees to comply with certain obligations, typically set out in a Franchise Agreement. The word "franchise" is of Anglo-French derivation—from franc, meaning free—and is used both as a noun and as a (transitive) verb.[1] For the franchiser, use of a franchise system is an alternative business growth strategy, compared to say expansion through corporate owned outlets or "chain stores"
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Climax, Saskatchewan
Climax is a village within the Rural Municipality of Lone Tree No. 18, Saskatchewan, Canada. The village is located in the southwestern region of the province, just north of the U.S
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Robert Inman
Robert Anthony Inman (June 13, 1931 – November 20, 2006) was an American educator, journalist and author. Inman was the son of Verne Inman, M.D., former chairman of the Department of Orthopedic Surgery at UCSF. He was born in San Francisco and attended Grattan School and Lowell High, achieving the highest honors. As he grew up, he worked summers as manager of the Headen Park Farm, a Santa Clara, California farm founded by his great-great grandfather, Benjamin F. Headen in 1852. The farm house is now the Inman-Headen Museum. Inman graduated from Stanford with distinction (Phi Beta Kappa) in 1952, and was awarded back-to-back Fulbright Scholarships in German Literature in Graz, Austria. During this time he met Joan Marshall (Stanford, '53) at a New Year’s gathering of Stanford friends in Vienna. They were married in Denver in 1958
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Meriden, Connecticut
Meriden is a city in New Haven County, Connecticut, United States, located halfway between the regional cities of New Haven and Hartford. In 2010, the population of the city was 60,868.[2]Contents1 History1.1 18th century 1.2 19th century to WWII1.2.1 Hollywood connection (1937–50) 1.2.2 Legacy of Meriden's grand manufacturing era1.3 WWII – 21st century2 Geography2.1 Principal communities3 Demographics3.1 Political affiliation4 Transportation4.1 Highway 4.2 Railroad 4.3 Bus 4.4 Airport5 Education 6 Points of interest 7 Notable people7.1 Arts and humanities 7.2 Business 7.3 Science and technology 7.4 Sports8 Media 9 Works cited 10 References 11 External linksHistory[edit] Solomon Goffe House
Solomon Goffe House
(1711), Meriden (2007)Plaque commemorating Abraham Lincoln's visit to Meriden in 1860 in front of City
City
Hall (2012)Meriden Britannia Co
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Mansard Roof
A mansard or mansard roof (also called a French roof or curb roof) is a four-sided gambrel-style hip roof characterized by two slopes on each of its sides with the lower slope, punctured by dormer windows, at a steeper angle than the upper.[1][2][3] The steep roof with windows creates an additional floor of habitable space[4] (a garret), and reduces the overall height of the roof for a given number of habitable stories. The upper slope of the roof may not be visible from street level when viewed from close proximity to the building. The earliest known example of a mansard roof is credited to Pierre Lescot on part of the Louvre
Louvre
built around 1550
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Riyadh
Riyadh
Riyadh
(/rɨˈjɑːd/; Arabic: الرياض‎ ar-Riyāḍ Najdi pronunciation: [er.rɪˈjɑːðˤ]) is the capital and most populous city of Saudi Arabia. It is also the capital of Riyadh Province
Riyadh Province
and belongs to the historical regions of Najd
Najd
and Al-Yamama. It is situated in the centre of the Arabian Peninsula
Arabian Peninsula
on a large plateau and home to more than six million people.[2] The city is divided into 15 municipal districts, managed by the Municipality of Riyadh
Riyadh
headed by the mayor of Riyadh, and the Development Authority of Riyadh
Riyadh
which is chaired by the governor of the Province, Faisal bin Bandar Al Saud. The current mayor is Ibrahim Mohammed Al-Sultan
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Charlottetown
Charlottetown
Charlottetown
(/ˈʃɑːrləttaʊn/; French pronunciation: ​[ʃaʁlɔt.tawn]; Scottish Gaelic: Baile Sheàrlot) is the capital and largest city of the Canadian province of Prince Edward Island, and the county seat of Queens County. Named after Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, queen consort of the United Kingdom, Charlottetown
Charlottetown
was originally an unincorporated town that incorporated as a city in 1855.[2] It was famously the site of the Charlottetown Conference
Charlottetown Conference
in 1864, the first gathering of Canadian and Maritime statesmen to debate the proposed Maritime Union
Maritime Union
and the more persuasive British North American Union, now known as Canadian Confederation
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Washington (state)
Washington (/ˈwɒʃɪŋtən/ ( listen)), officially the State of Washington, is a state in the Pacific Northwest
Pacific Northwest
region of the United States. Named after George Washington, the first president of the United States, the state was made out of the western part of the Washington Territory, which was ceded by Britain in 1846 in accordance with the Oregon Treaty
Oregon Treaty
in the settlement of the Oregon
Oregon
boundary dispute. It was admitted to the Union as the 42nd state in 1889. Olympia is the state capital. Washington is sometimes referred to as Washington State to distinguish it from Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States, which is often shortened to Washington. Washington is the 18th largest state with an area of 71,362 square miles (184,827 km2), and the 13th most populous state with over 7.4 million people
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Minneapolis, Minnesota
US: 46th MN: 1st • Density 7,660/sq mi (2,959/km2) • Metro 3,551,036 (US: 16th)[1] • CSA 4,197,883 (US: 14th)Demonym(s) MinneapolitanTime zone CST (UTC–6) • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC–5)ZIP Codes 55401–55488 (range includes some ZIP Codes for Minneapolis
Minneapolis
suburbs)Area code(s) 612FIPS code 27-43000GNIS feature ID 0655030[4]Website www.minneapolismn.gov
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Edmonton
Edmonton
Edmonton
(/ˈɛdməntən/ ( listen); Cree: Amiskwaciy Waskahikan; Blackfoot: Omahkoyis) is the capital city of the Canadian province of Alberta. Edmonton
Edmonton
is on the North Saskatchewan River
North Saskatchewan River
and is the centre of the Edmonton
Edmonton
Metropolitan Region, which is surrounded by Alberta's central region
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Brazier
A brazier /ˈbreɪʒər/ is a container for hot coals, generally taking the form of an upright standing or hanging metal bowl or box. Used for burning solid fuel, usually charcoal, braziers principally provide heat, but may also be used for cooking and cultural rituals. Braziers have been recovered from many early archaeological sites like the Nimrud brazier, recently excavated by the Iraqi National Museum, which dates back to at least 824 BC.[1]Contents1 History 2 Uses2.1 Heating 2.2 Scent 2.3 Other3 Gallery 4 See also 5 ReferencesHistory[edit]Ancient Greek brazier and casserole, 6th/4th century BC, exhibited in the Ancient Agora Museum in Athens, housed in the Stoa of AttalusBraziers are mentioned in the Bible. The Hebrew
Hebrew
word for brazier is of Egyptian origin, suggesting that it was imported from Egypt. There are two references to it in the Bible
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Burnet, Texas
Burnet (/ˈbɜːrnɪt/ BUR-net) is a city in and the county seat of Burnet County, Texas, United States.[3] The population was 5,987 at the 2010 census.[4] Both the city and the county were named for David Gouverneur Burnet, the first (provisional) president of the Republic of Texas. He also served as Vice President during the administration of Mirabeau B. Lamar.Contents1 Geography 2 History 3 Demographics 4 Economy 5 Education 6 Transportation 7 Tourist attractions 8 Notable people 9 Gallery 10 Climate 11 References 12 External linksGeography[edit] Burnet is located one mile west of the divide between the Brazos and Colorado River watersheds near the center of Burnet County. It is 54 miles (87 km) northwest of the state capital, Austin – roughly a 1- to 1½-hour drive via U.S. Highway 183 and State Highway 29. It is 36 miles (58 km) west of Georgetown and Interstate Highway 35 via State Highway 29, and 100 miles (160 km) north of San Antonio on U.S
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Broadcast Syndication
Broadcasting
Broadcasting
syndication is the license to broadcast television programs and radio programs by multiple television stations and radio stations, without going through a broadcast network. It is common in the United States where broadcast programming is scheduled by television networks with local independent affiliates. Syndication is less of a practice in the rest of the world, as most countries have centralized networks or television stations without local affiliates; although less common, shows can be syndicated internationally
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