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Daily Mail
Northcliffe House 2 Derry Street London W8 5TTCirculation 1,383,932 (as of November 2017)[1]ISSN 0307-7578 OCLC
OCLC
number 16310567Website www.dailymail.co.ukThe Daily Mail
Daily Mail
is a British daily middle-market[2][3] tabloid newspaper owned by the Daily Mail
Daily Mail
and General Trust[4] and published in London. It is the United Kingdom's second-biggest-selling daily newspaper after The Sun.[5] Its sister paper The Mail on Sunday
The Mail on Sunday
was launched in 1982 while Scottish and Irish editions of the daily paper were launched in 1947 and 2006 respectively
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Select Committee (Westminster System)
In British politics, parliamentary select committees can be appointed from the House of Commons, like the Foreign Affairs Select Committee, from the House of Lords, like the Delegated Powers and Regulatory Reform Committee, or as a "Joint Committee" drawn from both, such as the Joint Committee on Human Rights. Committees may exist as "sessional" committees – i.e. be near-permanent – or as "ad-hoc" committees with a specific deadline by which to complete their work, after which they cease to exist, such as the recent Lords Committee on Public Service and Demographic Change.[1] The Commons select committees are generally responsible for overseeing the work of government departments and agencies, whereas those of the Lords look at general issues, such as the constitution, considered by the Constitution Committee, or the economy, considered by the Economic Affairs Committee
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Prime Minister Of The United Kingdom
The Prime Minister
Prime Minister
of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
is the head of Her Majesty's Government in the United Kingdom. The Prime Minister
Prime Minister
(informally abbreviated to PM) and Cabinet (consisting of all the most senior ministers, most of whom are government department heads) are collectively accountable for their policies and actions to the Monarch, to Parliament, to their political party and ultimately to the electorate. The office is one of the Great Offices of State
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Daily Newspaper
A newspaper is a periodical publication containing written information about current events. Newspapers
Newspapers
can cover wide variety of fields such as politics, business, sport and art and often include materials such as opinion columns, weather forecasts, reviews of local services, obituaries, birth notices, crosswords, editorial cartoons, comic strips, and advice columns. Most newspapers are businesses, and they pay their expenses with a mixture of subscription revenue, newsstand sales, and advertising revenue. The journalism organizations that publish newspapers are themselves often metonymically called newspapers. Newspapers
Newspapers
have traditionally been published in print (usually on cheap, low-grade paper called newsprint)
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First World War
Allied victoryCentral Powers' victory on the Eastern Front nullified by defeat on the Western Front Fall of the German, Russian, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian empires Russian Civil War
Russian Civil War
and foundation of the Soviet Union Formation of new countries in Europe
Europe
and the Middle East Transfer of German colonies
German colonies
and regions of the former Ottoman Empire to other powers Establishment of the League of Nations
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Zeppelin
A Zeppelin
Zeppelin
is a type of rigid airship named after the German Count Ferdinand von Zeppelin
Ferdinand von Zeppelin
(German pronunciation: [ˈt͡sɛpəliːn]) who pioneered rigid airship development at the beginning of the 20th century. Zeppelin's notions were first formulated in 1874[1] and developed in detail in 1893.[2] They were patented in Germany in 1895 and in the United States in 1899.[3] After the outstanding success of the Zeppelin
Zeppelin
design, the word zeppelin came to be commonly used to refer to all rigid airships. Zeppelins were first flown commercially in 1910 by Deutsche Luftschiffahrts-AG
Deutsche Luftschiffahrts-AG
(DELAG), the world's first airline in revenue service. By mid-1914, DELAG
DELAG
had carried over 10,000 fare-paying passengers on over 1,500 flights
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House Of Lords
The House of Lords
House of Lords
of the United Kingdom, also known as the House of Peers, is the upper house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. Like the House of Commons, it meets in the Palace of Westminster.[2] Officially, the full name of the house is the Right Honourable the Lords Spiritual
Lords Spiritual
and Temporal of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
in Parliament assembled. Unlike the elected House of Commons, all members of the House of Lords (excluding 90 hereditary peers elected among themselves and two peers who are ex officio members) are appointed.[3] The membership of the House of Lords
House of Lords
is drawn from the peerage and is made up of Lords Spiritual and Lords Temporal
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Audit Bureau Of Circulations (UK)
Bureau (/ˈbjʊəroʊ/ BEWR-oh) may refer to:Contents1 Agencies and organizations 2 Furniture 3 Geography 4 Other uses 5 See alsoAgencies and organizations[edit] Public administration
Public administration
offices of various kinds Government agencies of various kinds News bureau, an office for gathering or distributing news, generally for a given geographical loc
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London Stock Exchange
The London
London
Stock
Stock
Exchange (LSE) is a stock exchange located in the City of London, England. As of December 2014[update], the Exchange had a market capitalisation of US$6.06 trillion (short scale), making it the third-largest stock exchange in the world[2] by this measurement (the largest in Europe ahead of Euronext). The Exchange was founded in 1801 and its current premises are situated in Paternoster Square
Paternoster Square
close to St Paul's Cathedral
St Paul's Cathedral
in the City of London. The Exchange is part of the London
London
Stock
Stock
Exchange Group. London
London
Stock
Stock
Exchange is one of the world’s oldest stock exchanges and can trace its history back more than 300 years
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Imperialism
Imperialism
Imperialism
is an action that involves a nation extending its power by the acquisition of inhabited territory. It may also include the exploitation of these territories, an action that is linked to colonialism. Colonialism
Colonialism
is generally regarded as an expression of imperialism. It is different from New Imperialism, as the term imperialism is usually applied to the colonization of the Americas between the 15th and 19th centuries, as opposed to the expansion of Western Powers (and Japan) during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. However, both are examples of imperialism.Contents1 Etymology and usage 2 Colonialism
Colonialism
vs
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Broadsheet
A broadsheet is the largest newspaper format and is characterized by long vertical pages (typically 22 inches or 56 centimetres). The term derives from types of popular prints usually just of a single sheet, sold on the streets and containing various types of material, from ballads to political satire. The first broadsheet newspaper was the Dutch Courante uyt Italien, Duytslandt, &c
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NRS Social Grade
The NRS social grades are a system of demographic classification used in the United Kingdom. They were originally developed by the National Readership Survey (NRS) to classify readers, but are now used by many other organisations for wider applications and have become a standard for market research.[1] They were developed over 50 years ago and achieved widespread usage in 20th century Britain
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English Channel
The English Channel
English Channel
(French: la Manche, "The Sleeve"; German: Ärmelkanal, "Sleeve Channel"; Breton: Mor Breizh, "Sea of Brittany"; Cornish: Mor Bretannek, "British Sea"), also called simply the Channel, is the body of water that separates southern England
England
from northern France, and links the southern part of the North Sea
North Sea
to the Atlantic Ocean
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Robert Gascoyne-Cecil, 3rd Marquess Of Salisbury
Robert Arthur Talbot Gascoyne-Cecil, 3rd Marquess of Salisbury, KG, GCVO, PC, FRS, DL (3 February 1830 – 22 August 1903), styled Lord Robert Cecil before 1865 and Viscount Cranborne
Viscount Cranborne
from June 1865 until April 1868, was a British statesman of the Conservative Party, serving as Prime Minister three times for a total of over thirteen years. He was the last Prime Minister to head his full administration from the House of Lords. Lord Robert Cecil was first elected to the House of Commons in 1854 and served as Secretary of State for India
Secretary of State for India
in Lord Derby's Conservative government from 1866 until his resignation in 1867 over its introduction of Benjamin Disraeli's Reform Bill that extended the suffrage to working-class men. In 1868 upon the death of his father, Cecil was elevated to the House of Lords
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Punch (magazine)
Punch; or, The London
London
Charivari was a British weekly magazine of humour and satire established in 1841 by Henry Mayhew
Henry Mayhew
and engraver Ebenezer Landells. Historically, it was most influential in the 1840s and 1850s, when it helped to coin the term "cartoon" in its modern sense as a humorous illustration. After the 1940s, when its circulation peaked, it went into a long decline, closing in 1992. It was revived in 1996, but closed again in 2002.Contents1 History 2 Later years2.1 Punch table3 Gallery of selected early covers 4 Contributors4.1 Editors 4.2 Cartoonists 4.3 Authors5 Influence 6 See also 7 Notes 8 Works cited 9 External linksHistory[edit] Punch was founded on 17 July 1841 by Henry Mayhew
Henry Mayhew
and engraver Ebenezer Landells, on an initial investment of £25. It was jointly edited by Mayhew and Mark Lemon
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OCLC
OCLC, currently incorporated as OCLC
OCLC
Online Computer Library Center, Incorporated,[3] is an American nonprofit cooperative organization "dedicated to the public purposes of furthering access to the world's information and reducing information costs".[4] It was founded in 1967 as the Ohio College Library Center. OCLC
OCLC
and its member libraries cooperatively produce and maintain WorldCat, the largest online public access catalog (OPAC) in the world
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