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Dacian Fortresses Of The Orăştie Mountains
Built in murus dacicus style, the six Dacian Fortresses of the Orăștie Mountains, in Romania, were created in the 1st centuries BC and AD as protection against Roman conquest, and played an important role during the Roman-Dacian wars. Their extensive and well-preserved remains present a picture of a vigorous and innovative ancient civilization.[citation needed] Today, treasure-hunters sometimes search the area, as Romania
Romania
lacks legislation in this domain.[citation needed] The six fortresses - Sarmizegetusa Regia, Costeşti-Cetăţuie, Costeşti-Blidaru, Piatra Roşie, Bănița and Căpâlna - that formed the defensive system of Decebalus
Decebalus
were designated as a UNESCO
UNESCO
World Heritage Site in 1999
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World Heritage Site
A World Heritage Site
World Heritage Site
is a landmark or area which is selected by the United Nations
United Nations
Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) as having cultural, historical, scientific or other form of significance, and is legally protected by international treaties. The sites are judged important to the collective interests of humanity. To be selected, a World Heritage Site
World Heritage Site
must be an already classified landmark, unique in some respect as a geographically and historically identifiable place having special cultural or physical significance (such as an ancient ruin or historical structure, building, city, complex, desert, forest, island, lake, monument, mountain, or wilderness area)
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Bessi
The Bessi
Bessi
(/ˈbɛsaɪ/; Ancient Greek: Βῆσσοι or Βέσσοι) were an independent Thracian tribe who lived in a territory ranging from Moesia
Moesia
to Mount Rhodope
Mount Rhodope
in southern Thrace, but are often mentioned as dwelling about Haemus, the mountain range that separates Moesia
Moesia
from Thrace
Thrace
and from Mount Rhodope
Mount Rhodope
to the northern part of Hebrus.[1] Herodotus[2] described them as a sort of priestly-caste among the Satrae, the Bessi
Bessi
being interpreters of the prophetic utterances given by a priestess in an oracular shrine of Dionysus located on a mountain-top. In 72 BC, the proconsul of Macedonia Marcus Terentius Varro Lucullus defeated the Bessi
Bessi
in Thrace
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Dacia
Dacian Kingdom168 BC–106 ADDacian Draco Dacia
Dacia
during the reign of Burebista, 82 BC.Capital Sarmizegetusa Regia[when?]Languages Dacian, Greek,[citation needed] Latin[citation needed]Religion ZamolxismGovernment Non-hereditary[1] monarchyKing •  beginning of the 2nd century BC Rubobostes •  first half of the 2nd century BC Oroles •  82-44 BC Burebista •  44–27 BC Cotiso •  27–29 BC/AD Comosicus[3] •  29–69 AD Scorilo •  69
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List Of Dacian Tribes
This is a list of ancient tribes in Thrace
Thrace
and Dacia
Dacia
(Ancient Greek: Θρᾴκη; Δακία) including possibly or partly Thracian
Thracian
or Dacian tribes, and non- Thracian
Thracian
or non-Dacian tribes that inhabited the lands known as Thrace
Thrace
and Dacia
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Aedi
Aedi
Aedi
(Greek: Αἶδοι) was a tribe of Getae.[1] See also[edit]List of ancient cities in Thrace and DaciaReferences[edit]^ The Cambridge ancient history Volume 3 by John Boardman - 1991, ISBN 0521227178, page 598: "Getic tribes were probably the Aedi, the Scaugdae
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Albocenses
Albocenses
Albocenses
(Latin: Albocenses/Albocensii) was a Dacian tribe[1] that inhabited the area of Banat
Banat
(Serbia, Romania) with the towns of Kovin (Contra Margum), Trans Tierna, Ad Medias II, Kladovo
Kladovo
(Ad Pontes), Apu, Arcidava, Centum Putea, Ram (Lederata) and Praetorium I. They lived between the Timiş River
Timiş River
(Tibiscus) and north of the Saldenses, south of the Biephi.[2] It is believed that the tribe migrated to Spain
Spain
in Roman times. Maximus of Moesia, the governor of Moesia
Moesia
under Emperor Valens, approached the lands of the Albocense
Albocense
prior to the Gothic Wars.[3] See also[edit]List of ancient tribes in Thrace and Dacia List of ancient cities in Thrace and Dacia MoesiaReferences[edit]^ Ioana Adina Oltean (2007). Dacia: Landscape, Colonisation and Romanisation. Routledge
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Anartes
The Anartes
Anartes
[1] a.k.a. Anarti, Anartii or Anartoi [1] were Celtic tribes, or, in the case of those sub-groups of Anartes
Anartes
which penetrated the ancient region of Dacia
Dacia
(roughly mod. Romania), Celts culturally assimilated by the Dacians.[2][3] Ptolemy's Geographia locates the Anartoi in Dacia.[4][5] Some groups of Anartes
Anartes
occupied parts of modern Slovakia
Slovakia
and southeastern Poland.[6] The Dacian town of Docidava
Docidava
was situated in the territory of the Anartes, according to Pârvan.[7] The Anartophracti
Anartophracti
(or Anartofraktoi) are mentioned by Ptolemy
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Apuli
The Apuli or Biefi were a Thracian tribe centered at the Dacian town Apulon
Apulon
( Latin
Latin
Apulum) near what is now Alba Iulia
Alba Iulia
in Transylvania, Romania. Apuli has clear resemblance to Apulia, the ancient southeastern Italy region, which is believed to have been settled by Illyrian tribes (also named Apuli or Iapyges). Linguists use it as an example for the similarities between Illyrian and Daco-Thracian languages.[1]Contents1 See also 2 Notes 3 References 4 External linksSee also[edit]Dacia List of ancient tribes in Thrace and Dacia Thraco-IllyrianNotes[edit]^ Russu 1969.References[edit]Russu, Ion I. (1969). Limba traco-dacilor (in Romanian)
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Biephi
Biephi
Biephi
was a Dacian tribe.[1] See also[edit]List of ancient cities in Thrace and DaciaReferences[edit]^ Dacia: Landscape, Colonization and Romanization by Ioana A Oltean, ISBN 0-415-41252-8, 2007, page 46External links[edit]Wikimedia Commons has media related to Dacia
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Bessoi
The Bessi
Bessi
(/ˈbɛsaɪ/; Ancient Greek: Βῆσσοι or Βέσσοι) were an independent Thracian tribe who lived in a territory ranging from Moesia
Moesia
to Mount Rhodope
Mount Rhodope
in southern Thrace, but are often mentioned as dwelling about Haemus, the mountain range that separates Moesia
Moesia
from Thrace
Thrace
and from Mount Rhodope
Mount Rhodope
to the northern part of Hebrus.[1] Herodotus[2] described them as a sort of priestly-caste among the Satrae, the Bessi
Bessi
being interpreters of the prophetic utterances given by a priestess in an oracular shrine of Dionysus located on a mountain-top. In 72 BC, the proconsul of Macedonia Marcus Terentius Varro Lucullus defeated the Bessi
Bessi
in Thrace
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Table Of World Heritage Sites By Country
As of July 2017, there are a total of 1,073[1] World Heritage Sites located in 167 "States Parties"[2] Of the 1,073 sites, 832 are cultural, 206 are natural and 35 are mixed properties. The countries have been divided by the World Heritage Committee
World Heritage Committee
into five geographic zones: Africa, Arab States, Asia and the Pacific, Europe
Europe
and North America, and Latin America
Latin America
and the Caribbean. The country with the most number of sites (including sites shared with other countries) is Italy, with 53 entries
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Burs (Dacia)
The Burs (Latin Buri, Buredeense and Buridavenses; Greek Βοῦροι) were a Dacian tribe living in Dacia
Dacia
in the 1st and 2nd centuries Common Era, with their capital city at Buridava.[1][2][3]Dacian Buri / Burridensi on the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
MapContents1 Name 2 Historical evidence 3 Identity and distribution 4 Notes 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksName[edit] According to Tomaschek, the root bur- is well known with the Dacian Thracian names: i.e
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Carpi (people)
The Carpi or Carpiani were an ancient people that resided in the eastern parts of modern Romania
Romania
in the historical region of Moldavia from no later than c. AD 140 and until at least AD 318[citation needed]. The ethnic affiliation of the Carpi remains disputed, as there is no direct evidence in the surviving ancient literary sources. A strong body of modern scholarly opinion considers that the Carpi were a tribe of the Dacian nation.[1][2][3] Other scholars have linked the Carpi to a variety of ethnic groups, including Sarmatians, Thracians, Slavs, Germans, and Celts[citation needed]. About a century after their earliest mention by Ptolemy[citation needed], during which time their relations with Rome appear to have been peaceful, the Carpi emerged in c. 238 as among Rome's most persistent enemies[citation needed]
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