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DMOZ
DMOZ
DMOZ
(from directory.mozilla.org, an earlier domain name) was a multilingual open-content directory of World Wide Web
World Wide Web
links. The site and community who maintained it were also known as the Open Directory Project (ODP)
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Yahoo! Search Marketing
Yahoo
Yahoo
Search Marketing is a keyword-based "Pay per click" or "Sponsored search" Internet advertising service provided by Yahoo. Yahoo
Yahoo
began offering this service after acquiring Overture Services, Inc. (formerly GoTo.com)
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Age Appropriate
Age appropriateness is the progression of behavioral norms largely agreed upon within a society or among sociological and psychological authorities to be appropriate to a child's development of social skills. These behaviors are divided into a number of development stages based upon the child's age. Lack of exposure to age appropriate activities and experiences is commonly thought to prevent a child from gaining the skills necessary for their current and thus their next stage of development. For example, clapping games are seen[by whom?] as appropriate for children aged 2 years and above because of the required communication skills and motor coordination. Biting
Biting
is seen[by whom?] as appropriate for children 2.5 years and below since they lack the skills and self-control to communicate otherwise. Content ratings often indicate at which age that content is considered by the rating body to be age-appropriate
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Google Directory
The Google
Google
Directory was a web directory hosted by Google. It was discontinued on July 20, 2011.Contents1 Information 2 Structure2.1 Main page 2.2 Main category pages 2.3 Hierarchy 2.4 World link 2.5 Kids and Teens3 Connection with the Open Directory Project 4 Trivia 5 ReferencesInformation[edit] The Google
Google
Directory was organized into 14 main categories:[1]Arts Business Computers Games Health Home News Recreation Reference Regional Science Shopping Society SportsThere were also two other links on the page: World and Kids and Teens.[1] The World link offered the directory in other languages.[2] The Kids and Teens link was a separate web archive for kids and teens. All of the Google
Google
Directory was based on the Open Directory Project.[citation needed] Structure[edit] Main page[edit] The main page had links to the 14 main categories, along with the World and Kids and Teens links
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Holding Company
A holding company is a company that owns other companies' outstanding stock. A holding company usually does not produce goods or services itself; rather, its purpose is to own shares of other companies to form a corporate group. Holding companies allow the reduction of risk for the owners and can allow the ownership and control of a number of different companies. In the United States, 80% of stock, in voting and value, must be owned before tax consolidation benefits such as tax-free dividends can be claimed.[1] That is, if Company A owns 80% or more of the stock of Company B, Company A will not pay taxes on dividends paid by Company B to its stockholders, as the payment of dividends from B to A is essentially transferring cash from one company to the other
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Uniform Resource Locator
A Uniform Resource Locator (URL), colloquially termed a web address,[1] is a reference to a web resource that specifies its location on a computer network and a mechanism for retrieving it. A URL is a specific type of Uniform Resource Identifier (URI),[2] although many people use the two terms interchangeably.[3][a] URLs occur most commonly to reference web pages (http), but are also used for file transfer (ftp), email (mailto), database access (JDBC), and many other applications. Most web browsers display the URL of a web page above the page in an address bar
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Catastrophic Failure
A catastrophic failure is a sudden and total failure from which recovery is impossible. Catastrophic failures often lead to cascading systems failure. The term is most commonly used for structural failures, but has often been extended to many other disciplines in which total and irrecoverable loss occurs
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Zeal (web)
Zeal was a volunteer-built web directory, first appearing in 1999, and then acquired by LookSmart in October 2000 for $20 million. Zeal combined the work of Looksmart's paid editors with that of volunteers who profiled websites and placed them in a hierarchy of subcategories. The resulting categories and profiles were downloaded at intervals by LookSmart and its partners, other search companies such as MSN, Lycos, and Altavista, for use in their own systems with or without modification. Paid editors attended to commercial sites and oversaw the voluntary work on non-commercial sites. Volunteers worked under a defined set of Guidelines and were required to pass an introductory level test on those Guidelines before submitting site profiles or edits. As points and experience were acquired, volunteers could elect to take a further exam which allowed them to "adopt" and create topic categories of special interest
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Larry Sanger
Lawrence Mark Sanger /sæŋər/[1] (born July 16, 1968[2]) is an American Internet
Internet
project developer, co-founder of, and the founder of Citizendium.[3][4][5] He grew up in Anchorage, Alaska.[4] From an early age he was interested in philosophy.[6] Sanger received a Bachelor of Arts in philosophy from Reed College
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Nupedia
Nupedia
Nupedia
was an English-language Web-based encyclopedia whose articles were written by volunteer contributors with appropriate subject matter expertise, reviewed by expert editors before publication and licensed as free content. It was founded by Jimmy Wales
Jimmy Wales
and underwritten by Bomis, with Larry Sanger
Larry Sanger
as editor-in-chief. Nupedia
Nupedia
lasted from October 1999[1][2] until September 2003. It is mostly known now as the predecessor of, but Nupedia
Nupedia
had a seven-step approval process to control content of articles before being posted, rather than live wiki-based updating
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Multilingualism
Multilingualism
Multilingualism
is the use of more than one language, either by an individual speaker or by a community of speakers. It is believed that multilingual speakers outnumber monolingual speakers in the world's population.[1] More than half of all Europeans
Europeans
claim to speak at least one language other than their mother tongue;[2] nevertheless, many of these are monoscriptual. Multilingualism
Multilingualism
is becoming a social phenomenon governed by the needs of globalization and cultural openness.[3] Owing to the ease of access to information facilitated by the Internet, individuals' exposure to multiple languages is becoming increasingly frequent, thereby promoting a need to acquire additional languages. People who speak several languages are also called polyglots.[4] Multilingual speakers have acquired and maintained at least one language during childhood, the so-called first language (L1)
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UTF-8
UTF-8
UTF-8
is a variable width character encoding capable of encoding all 1,112,064[1] valid code points in Unicode
Unicode
using one to four 8-bit bytes.[2] The encoding is defined by the Unicode
Unicode
standard, and was originally designed by Ken Thompson
Ken Thompson
and Rob Pike.[3][4] The name is derived from Unicode
Unicode
(or Universal Coded Character Set) Transformation Format – 8-bit.[5] It was designed for backward compatibility with ASCII. Code points with lower numerical values, which tend to occur more frequently, are encoded using fewer bytes. The first 128 characters of Unicode, which correspond one-to-one with ASCII, are encoded using a single octet with the same binary value as ASCII, so that valid ASCII
ASCII
text is valid UTF-8-encoded Unicode
Unicode
as well
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GNU
GNU
GNU
/ɡnuː/ ( listen)[3][4] is an operating system[5][6][7][8] and an extensive collection of computer software. GNU
GNU
is composed wholly of free software,[9][10][11] most of which is licensed under the
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ISO 8859-1
ISO/IEC 8859-1:1998, Information technology — 8-bit single-byte coded graphic character sets — Part 1: Latin alphabet No. 1, is part of the ISO/IEC 8859 series of ASCII-based standard character encodings, first edition published in 1987. ISO 8859-1 encodes what it refers to as "Latin alphabet no. 1," consisting of 191 characters from the Latin script. This character-encoding scheme is used throughout the Americas, Western Europe, Oceania, and much of Africa. It is also commonly used in most standard romanizations of East-Asian languages. It is the basis for most popular 8-bit character sets, including Windows-1252
Windows-1252
and the first block of characters in Unicode. It is very common (on the Internet) to mislabel Windows-1252
Windows-1252
text with the charset label ISO-8859-1
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Web Crawler
A Web crawler, sometimes called a spider, is an Internet bot that systematically browses the World Wide Web, typically for the purpose of Web indexing (web spidering). Web search engines and some other sites use Web crawling
Web crawling
or spidering software to update their web content or indices of others sites' web content. Web crawlers copy pages for processing by a search engine which indexes the downloaded pages so users can search more efficiently. Crawlers consume resources on visited systems and often visit sites without approval. Issues of schedule, load, and "politeness" come into play when large collections of pages are accessed. Mechanisms exist for public sites not wishing to be crawled to make this known to the crawling agent
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Link Rot
Link rot (or linkrot) is the process by which hyperlinks on individual websites or the Internet
Internet
in general point to web pages, servers or other resources that have become permanently unavailable. The phrase also describes the effects of failing to update out-of-date web pages that clutter search engine results. Research[1][2] shows that the half-life of a random webpage is two years.Contents1 Terminology 2 Causes 3 Prevalence 4 Discovering 5 Combating5.1 Authoring 5.2 Server side 5.3 User side 5.4 Web archiving6 See also 7 Further reading7.1 Link rot on the Web 7.2 In academic literature 7.3 In digital libraries8 References 9 External linksTerminology[edit] Link rot is also called "link death", "link breaking" or "reference rot". A link that does not work any more is called a "broken link", "dead link", or "dangling link"
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