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Czyżówka, Warmian Masurian Voivodeship
A voivodeship /ˈvɔɪˌvoʊdˌʃɪp/ is the area administered by a voivode (Governor) in several countries of central and eastern Europe. Voivodeships have existed since medieval times in Poland, Hungary, Lithuania, Latvia, Ukraine, Russia
Russia
and Serbia. The administrative level of area (territory) of voivodeship resembles that of a duchy in western medieval states, much as the title of voivode was equivalent to that of a duke. Other roughly equivalent titles and areas in medieval Eastern Europe
Eastern Europe
included ban (bojan, vojin or bayan) and banate. In a modern context, the word normally refers to one of the provinces (województwa) of Poland
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Voivodeships Of Poland
A województwo ([vɔjɛˈvut͡stfɔ]; plural: województwa) is the highest-level administrative subdivision of Poland, corresponding to a "province" in many other countries. The term "województwo" has been in use since the 14th century, and is commonly translated in English as "province".[1] Województwo is also rendered in English by "voivodeship" (/ˈvɔɪvoʊdʃɪp/) or a variant spelling.[2] The Polish local government reforms
Polish local government reforms
adopted in 1998, which went into effect on 1 January 1999, created sixteen new voivodeships. These replaced the 49 former voivodeships that had existed from 1 July 1975, and bear greater resemblance (in territory but not in name) to the voivodeships that existed between 1950 and 1975. Today's voivodeships are mostly named after historical and geographical regions, while those prior to 1998 generally took their names from the cities on which they were centered
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Opole Voivodeship
Opole
Opole
Voivodeship, or Opole
Opole
Province[1] (Polish: województwo opolskie [vɔjɛˈvutstfɔ ɔˈpɔlskʲɛ], German: Woiwodschaft Oppeln), is the smallest and least populated voivodeship (province) of Poland. The province's name derives from that of the region's capital and largest city, Opole. It is part of Upper Silesia
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Szczecin
Szczecin
Szczecin
(/ˈʃtʃɛtʃɪn/; Polish: [ˈʂt͡ʂɛt͡ɕin] ( listen); German and Swedish: Stettin,[1] known also by other alternative names) is the capital and largest city of the West Pomeranian Voivodeship
West Pomeranian Voivodeship
in Poland. Located near the Baltic Sea
Baltic Sea
and the German border, it is a major seaport and Poland's seventh-largest city. As of June 2011, the population was 407,811.[2] Szczecin
Szczecin
is located on the Oder, south of the Szczecin Lagoon
Szczecin Lagoon
and the Bay of Pomerania. The city is situated along the southwestern shore of Dąbie Lake, on both sides of the Oder
Oder
and on several large islands between the western and eastern branches of the river
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Administrative Divisions Of Poland
The administrative division of Poland
Poland
since 1999 has been based on three levels of subdivision. The territory of Poland
Poland
is divided into voivodeships (provinces); these are further divided into powiats (counties or districts), and these in turn are divided into gminas (communes or municipalities). Major cities normally have the status of both gmina and powiat. Poland
Poland
currently has 16 voivodeships, 379 powiats (including 65 cities with powiat status), and 2,479 gminas.[1] The current system was introduced pursuant to a series of acts passed by the Polish parliament in 1998, and came into effect on 1 January 1999. Previously (in the period from 1975 to 1998) there had been 49 smaller voivodeships, and no powiats (see Administrative division of the People's Republic of Poland)
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Greater Poland Voivodeship
Greater Poland
Greater Poland
Voivodeship
Voivodeship
(in Polish: Województwo Wielkopolskie [vɔjɛˈvut͡stfɔ vjɛlkɔˈpɔlskʲɛ]), also known as Wielkopolska Voivodeship, Wielkopolska Province,[1] or Greater Poland Province, is a voivodeship, or province, in west-central Poland. It was created on 1 January 1999 out of the former Poznań, Kalisz, Konin, Piła
Piła
and Leszno
Leszno
Voivodeships, pursuant to the Polish local government reforms adopted in 1998. The province is named after the region called Greater Poland
Greater Poland
or Wielkopolska [vjɛlkɔˈpɔlska] ( listen)
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Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship
Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship, also known as Cuiavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship or simply Kujawsko-Pomorskie,[1] or Kujawy-Pomerania Province[2] (in Polish, województwo kujawsko-pomorskie [vɔjɛˈvut͡stfɔ kuˈjafskɔ pɔˈmɔrskʲɛ]), is one of the 16 voivodeships (provinces) into which Poland
Poland
is now divided. It is situated in mid-northern Poland, on the boundary between the two historic regions from which it takes its name: Kuyavia
Kuyavia
(Polish: Kujawy) and Pomerania
Pomerania
(Polish: Pomorze)
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Lesser Poland Voivodeship
Lesser Poland
Poland
Voivodeship
Voivodeship
or Lesser Poland
Poland
Province (in Polish, województwo małopolskie [vɔjɛˈvut͡stfɔ mawɔˈpɔlskʲɛ]), also known as Małopolska
Małopolska
Voivodeship
Voivodeship
or Małopolska
Małopolska
Province,[1] is a voivodeship (province), in southern Poland. It has an area of 15,108 square kilometres (5,833 sq mi), and a population of 3,267,731 (2006). It was created on 1 January 1999 out of the former Kraków, Tarnów, Nowy Sącz
Nowy Sącz
and parts of Bielsko-Biała, Katowice, Kielce
Kielce
and Krosno Voivodeships, pursuant to the Polish local government reforms
Polish local government reforms
adopted in 1998
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Łódź Voivodeship
Coordinates: 51°36′43″N 19°25′26″E / 51.61194°N 19.42389°E / 51.61194; 19.42389 Łódź
Łódź
Voivodeship Województwo łódzkieVoivodeshipFlagCoat of armsLocation within PolandDivision into countiesCoordinates (Łódź): 51°47′N 19°28′E / 51.783°N 19.467°E / 51.783; 19.467Country  PolandCapital ŁódźCounties3 cities, 21 land counties*Łódź Piotrków Trybunalski Skierniewice
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Lower Silesian Voivodeship
Lower Silesian Voivodeship, or Lower Silesia
Lower Silesia
Province[1] (Polish: województwo dolnośląskie [vɔjɛˈvut͡stfɔ dɔlnɔˈɕlɔ̃skʲɛ]), in southwestern Poland, is one of the 16 voivodeships (provinces) into which Poland
Poland
is divided. Lower Silesia
Lower Silesia
was part of Medieval Poland
Poland
during the Piast dynasty. After the testament of Bolesław III Wrymouth in 1138, Poland
Poland
entered a period of fragmentation. Silesia
Silesia
became a province of Poland
Poland
as a duchy, which later on became divided into many small duchies reigned by dukes and princes of the Piast dynasty. During this time, cultural and ethnic Germanic influence prospered due to immigrants from the German-speaking areas of the Holy Roman Empire. This also impacted on the local architecture as well as traditions and cuisine
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Lublin Voivodeship
Lublin
Lublin
Voivodeship, or Lublin
Lublin
Province[1] (in Polish, województwo lubelskie [vɔjɛˈvut͡stfɔ luˈbɛlskʲɛ]), is a voivodeship, or province, located in southeastern Poland. It was created on January 1, 1999, out of the former Lublin, Chełm, Zamość, Biała Podlaska and (partially) Tarnobrzeg and Siedlce Voivodeships, pursuant to Polish local government reforms
Polish local government reforms
adopted in 1998
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Lubusz Voivodeship
Lubusz Voivodeship, or Lubusz Province[1] (in Polish, województwo lubuskie [vɔjɛˈvut͡stfɔ luˈbuskʲɛ]), is a voivodeship (province) in western Poland. It was created on January 1, 1999, out of the former Gorzów Wielkopolski and Zielona Góra
Zielona Góra
Voivodeships, pursuant to the Polish local government reforms adopted in 1998. The province's name recalls the historic Lubusz Land[2] ( Lebus
Lebus
or Lubus), although parts of the voivodeship belong to the historic regions of Silesia, Greater Poland and Lusatia. Until 1945, it mainly formed the Neumark
Neumark
within the Prussian Province of Brandenburg. The functions of regional capital are shared between two cities: Gorzów Wielkopolski
Gorzów Wielkopolski
and Zielona Góra
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Masovian Voivodeship
Mazovian Voivodeship or Mazovia Province[3] (Polish: województwo mazowieckie [vɔjɛˈvut͡stfɔ mazɔˈvʲɛtskʲɛ]), is the largest and most populous of the 16 Polish provinces, or voivodeships, created in 1999. It occupies 35,579 square kilometres (13,737 sq mi) of east-central Poland, and has 5,324,500 inhabitants.[1] Its principal cities are Warsaw
Warsaw
(1.749 million) in the centre of the Warsaw
Warsaw
metropolitan area, Radom
Radom
(226,000) in the south, Płock
Płock
(127,000) in the west, Siedlce
Siedlce
(77,000) in the east, and Ostrołęka
Ostrołęka
(55,000) in the north
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Podlaskie Voivodeship
Podlaskie Voivodeship
Podlaskie Voivodeship
or Podlasie Province[1] (Polish: Województwo podlaskie, [vɔjɛˈvut͡stfɔ pɔdˈlaskʲɛ]) is a voivodeship (province) in northeastern Poland. It borders on Masovian Voivodeship to the west, Warmian-Masurian Voivodeship
Warmian-Masurian Voivodeship
to the northwest, Lublin Voivodeship to the south, the Belarusian Voblasts of Grodno and Brest to the east, the Lithuanian Counties of Alytus and Marijampolė to the northeast, and the Kaliningrad Oblast
Kaliningrad Oblast
of Russia
Russia
to the north. The capital of Podlasie Province is Białystok
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Webster's Third New International Dictionary
Webster's Third New International Dictionary of the English Language, Unabridged (commonly known as Webster's Third, or W3) was published in September 1961. It was edited by Philip Babcock Gove and a team of lexicographers who spent 757 editor-years and $3.5 million. It contained more than 450,000 entries, including more than 100,000 new entries and as many new senses for entries carried over from previous editions. The final definition, Zyzzogeton, was written on October 17, 1960; the final etymology was recorded on October 26; and the final pronunciation was transcribed on November 9. The final copy went to the typesetters, RR Donnelley, on December 2. The book was printed by the Riverside Press
Riverside Press
in Cambridge, Massachusetts
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Pomeranian Voivodeship
Pomeranian Voivodeship, Pomorskie Region, or Pomerania
Pomerania
Province[1] (in Polish województwo pomorskie [vɔjɛˈvut͡stfɔ pɔˈmɔrskʲɛ], in Kashubian Pòmòrsczé wòjewództwò), is a voivodeship, or province, in north-western Poland. It comprises most of Pomerelia
Pomerelia
(the easternmost part of historical Pomerania), as well as an area east of the Vistula
Vistula
River. The western part of the province, around Słupsk, belonged historically to Farther Pomerania, while Pomerelia
Pomerelia
and the eastern bank of the Vistula
Vistula
belonged to the historical region of Prussia. The central parts of the province are also known as Kashubia, named after the Kashubian minority
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