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Cyfraith Hywel
Cyfraith Hywel (Welsh: [ˈkəvraiθ ˈhəwɛl]; Laws of Hywel), also known as Welsh law
Welsh law
(Latin: Leges Walliæ[1]), was the system of law practised in medieval Wales
Wales
before its final conquest by England. Subsequently, the Welsh law's criminal codes were superseded by the Statute of Rhuddlan in AD 1284 and its civil codes by Henry VIII's series of Laws in Wales
Wales
Acts between 1535 and 1542. Welsh law
Welsh law
was a form of Celtic law
Celtic law
with many similarities to the Brehon law of Ireland
Ireland
and particularly the customs and terminology of the Britons of Strathclyde.[2] It was passed down orally by jurists and bards and, according to tradition, only first codified during the reign of Hywel Dda in the mid-10th century
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Tatws Pum Munud
Tatws Pum Munud
Tatws Pum Munud
[ˈtatʊs pɨ̞m ˈmɨːnɨ̞d] (English: Five-minute potatoes) is a traditional Welsh stew, made with smoked bacon, stock, potatoes and other vegetables. As a stew, it is unique in that all the main ingredients are cut into slices, so as to lie flat. Because of this, it is normally cooked in a large frying pan, on top of the stove, and served on a plate (as opposed to a bowl). The vegetables used are typically potatoes, onions, carrots (sliced lengthwise) and peas. Although usually made with smoked bacon, minced beef is occasionally substituted. The dish is normally accompanied by crusty bread and butter
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Dydd Santes Dwynwen
Dydd Santes Dwynwen
Dwynwen
(IPA: [ˈdɨːð ˈsantɛs ˈdʊɨnwɛn]; Welsh for St Dwynwen's Day) is considered to be the Welsh equivalent to Valentine's Day
Valentine's Day
and is celebrated on 25 January every year. It celebrates Dwynwen, the Welsh saint of lovers.[1]Contents1 Story 2 Llanddwyn 3 Celebration 4 Children's versions 5 References 6 External linksStory[edit]St Dwynwen's Church, Llanddwyn c.1778Much of Welsh history
Welsh history
is based on stories and songs which were traditionally passed on by word of mouth. As such, the original tale has become mixed with elements of folktales and Celtic stories, and so there are a number variations on the tale. In the 5th Century Dwynwen
Dwynwen
fell in love with Maelon Dafodrill. Maelon returned her feelings but they could not be together for her father forbade the marriage and her father had already promised her to someone else
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Glamorgan Sausage
Glamorgan sausage
Glamorgan sausage
(Welsh: Selsig Morgannwg) is a traditional Welsh vegetarian sausage for which the main ingredients are cheese (usually Caerphilly), leeks and breadcrumbs. The earliest published mention of the dish is from the 1850s in the book Wild Wales
Wild Wales
by George Borrow, although earlier records in the Glamorgan Archives show a version which contains pork. The modern vegetarian version became popular during the Second World War
Second World War
when meat was harder to come by, and is now mass-produced by at least two companies. Variations include swapping the leeks for onions, as well as different herbs and spices, and various types of cheese.Contents1 History 2 Recipe2.1 Variations3 See also 4 Notes 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] The origins of Glamorgan sausages are unknown
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Illuminated Manuscript
An illuminated manuscript is a manuscript in which the text is supplemented with such decoration as initials, borders (marginalia) and miniature illustrations. In the strictest definition, the term refers only to manuscripts decorated with gold or silver; but in both common usage and modern scholarship, the term refers to any decorated or illustrated manuscript from Western traditions. Comparable Far Eastern and Mesoamerican works are described as painted. Islamic manuscripts may be referred to as illuminated, illustrated or painted, though using essentially the same techniques as Western works. This article covers the technical, social and economic history of the subject; for an art-historical account, see miniature. The earliest surviving substantive illuminated manuscripts are from the period 400 to 600, produced in the Kingdom of the Ostrogoths
Kingdom of the Ostrogoths
and the Eastern Roman Empire
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Welsh Cake
Welsh cakes (Welsh: picau ar y maen, pice bach, cacen gri or teisen radell), also Welshcakes or pics, are traditional in Wales.[1][2] They have been popular since the late 19th Century with the addition of fat, sugar and dried fruit to a longer standing recipe for flat-bread baked on a griddle.[3] The cakes are also known as bakestones within Wales
Wales
because they are traditionally cooked on a bakestone (Welsh: maen or planc), a cast-iron griddle about 1.5 cm or more thick which is placed on the fire or cooker; on rare occasions, people may refer to them as griddle scones.[4] Welsh cakes are made from flour, butter/lard, currants, eggs, milk, and spices such as cinnamon and nutmeg.[5] They are roughly circular, a few inches (7–8 cm) in diameter and about half an inch (1–1.5 cm) thick. Welsh cakes are served hot or cold dusted with caster sugar
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Welsh Rarebit
Welsh rarebit
Welsh rarebit
(spelling based on folk etymology) or Welsh rabbit (original spelling)[1][2] is a dish made with a savoury sauce of melted cheese and various other ingredients and served hot, after being poured over slices (or other pieces) of toasted bread,[3] or the hot cheese sauce may be served in a chafing dish like a fondue, accompanied by sliced, toasted bread.[4] The names of the dish originate from 18th-century Britain.[5] Despite the name, the dish contains no rabbit meat.Contents1 Sauce 2 Variants 3 Origin3.1 Welsh 3.2 Rarebit4 In culture 5 See also 6 Refer
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List Of Welsh Dishes
Welsh dishes as a whole are generally associated with simplicity.[1] Unlike the other parts of the United Kingdom, Wales is not considered have a strong food identity, with many people believing there is "no such thing as Welsh food".[2] Welsh cookery is thought to be similar to English cuisine
English cuisine
in style. There are few written records of Welsh foods, recipes were instead held within families and passed down orally between the women of the family.[3] Those with the skills and inclination to write Welsh recipes, the upper classes, conformed to English styles and therefore would not have run their houses with traditional Welsh cuisine. Despite being poorly recorded, the traditional cookery of Wales does exist
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List Of Restaurants In Wales
The number of restaurants in Wales has significantly increased since the 1960s, when the country had very few notable places to eat out.[1] Today, Wales is no longer considered a "gastronomic desert",[1] there are currently five Michelin starred restaurants within the country.[2] Other award systems from TripAdvisor
TripAdvisor
and AA have included Welsh restaurants in their lists. The most significant increase in restaurants has been at the high-end, but there has been growth and improvement in quality across all the whole range of Welsh eateries.[1] Many Welsh restaurants attempt to showcase their "Welshness", but few include historic Welsh dishes besides cawl
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Welsh Holidays
These are the main holidays traditionally celebrated in Wales
Wales
that are not shared with the rest of the United Kingdom. Except for those that fall at the same time as UK public holidays, none of these holidays are bank holidays. There is, however, much support for the recognition of St David's Day as a bank holiday in Wales, in the same way as St Patrick's Day in Northern Ireland, and St Andrew's Day
St Andrew's Day
in Scotland. Many of the seasoned festivals originate in the Celtic culture of Wales, as does the manner of their celebration.Contents1 Historic Practice 2 Saints' Days2.1 St. David's
St

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Calennig
Calennig [kaˈlɛnɪɡ] is a Welsh word meaning "New Year celebration/gift", although it literally translates to "the first day of the month", deriving from the Latin
Latin
word kalends
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Gŵyl Fair Y Canhwyllau
Gŵyl Fair y Canhwyllau (English, "Mary's Festival of the Candles") is a Welsh name of Candlemas, celebrated on 2 February. It is the Welsh equivalent of the Goidelic
Goidelic
holiday of Imbolc. It was derived from the pre-Reformation ceremony of blessing the candles and distributing them to be carried in a procession. However, just as this Christian ceremony drew on pagan festivals connected with the coming of the Spring, some of the old practices that carried on in parts of Wales until the 20th Century suggest older rituals. The festival of early Spring is not connected with Saint Brigid of Kildare, as it is in Scotland and Ireland, however. Customs[edit]The period of time when working by candlelight was allowed, due to it being the dark part of the year, was amser gwylad, the time of keeping vigil
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List Of Welsh Language Authors
For Welsh language poets prior to 1600, see List of Welsh language poets.ContentsA B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y ZA[edit] Richard Ithamar Aaron (1901–1987) William Ambrose (Emrys)
William Ambrose (Emrys)
(1813–1873) Gwynn ap Gwilym (born 1950) Charles Ashton (1848–1898)B[edit] William Ambrose Bebb
William Ambrose Bebb
(1894–1953) Tom Beynon (1886–1961) John Blackwell (Alun)
John Blackwell (Alun)
(1797–1841) Käte Bosse-Griffiths
Käte Bosse-Griffiths
(1910–1998) David James Bowen (born 1925) Euros Bowen (1904–1988) Geraint Bowen (1915–2011) Siôn Bradford (1706–1785) Robert Bryan (1858–1920)C[edit] Rhys Cadwaladr (fl
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Saint David's Day
Saint David's Day
Saint David's Day
(Welsh: Dydd Gŵyl Dewi, Welsh pronunciation: [dɨːð ɡʊɨl ˈdɛui]) is the feast day of Saint David, the patron saint of Wales, and falls on 1 March, the date of Saint David's death in 589 AD. The feast has been regularly celebrated since the canonisation of David in the 12th century (by Pope Callistus II), though it is not a national holiday in the UK. Traditional festivities include wearing daffodils and leeks, recognised symbols of Wales
Wales
and Saint David
Saint David
respectively, eating traditional Welsh food including cawl and Welsh rarebit, and women wearing traditional Welsh dress
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Calan Mai
Calan Mai
Calan Mai
([ˈkalan ˈmaɪ̯] "Calend (first day) of May") or Calan Haf ([ˈkalan ˈhaːv] "Calend of Summer") is a May Day
May Day
holiday of Wales
Wales
held on 1 May
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Gathering Day
Gathering Day is a Welsh festival of the summer solstice, so called because it was the time when druids gathered mistletoe and other plants for use in winter.[1] The energy of plants harvested at Midsummer
Midsummer
was believed to be very potent, hence herbs were collected then for medicinal use; these herbs included mugwort and vervain. This festival marks the first of the three harvests of the year and the time for collecting young tender vegetables such as peas, beans and early fruits
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