HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Cyclostomata
Cyclostomata
Cyclostomata
is a group of agnathans that comprises the living jawless fishes: the lampreys and hagfishes. Both groups have round mouths that lack jaws but have retractable horny teeth. The name Cyclostomata means "round mouths".[1][2] Their mouths cannot close due to the lack of a jaw, so they have to constantly cycle water through the mouth. Possible relationships[edit] This taxon is often included in the paraphyletic superclass Agnatha, which also includes several groups of extinct armored fishes called ostracoderms. Most fossil agnathans, such as galeaspids, thelodonts, and osteostracans, are more closely related to vertebrates with jaws (called gnathostomes) than to cyclostomes.[3][4] Cyclostomes seem to have split off before the evolution of dentine and bone, which are present in many fossil agnathans, including conodonts.[5] Biologists disagree about whether cyclostomes are a clade
[...More...]

"Cyclostomata" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

PubMed Central
PubMed
PubMed
Central (PMC) is a free digital repository that archives publicly accessible full-text scholarly articles that have been published within the biomedical and life sciences journal literature. As one of the major research databases within the suite of resources that have been developed by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), PubMed
PubMed
Central is much more than just a document repository
[...More...]

"PubMed Central" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Spiral Valve
A spiral valve or scroll valve is the corkscrew shaped lower portion of the intestine of some sharks, Acipenseriformes (sturgeon and paddlefish), rays, skates, bichirs, and lungfishes. A modification of the ileum, the spiral valve is internally twisted or coiled to increase the surface area of the intestine, to increase nutrient absorption.[1] The intestines of a shark are much shorter than those of mammals. Sharks have compensated for this problem by having a spiral valve, or a scroll valve, inside the intestine to increase the absorbent surface of the intestine. By keeping digestible material in the ileum for an extended period maximum nutrient absorption is ensured. For this reason, many sharks and related fish feed very infrequently
[...More...]

"Spiral Valve" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
[...More...]

"Digital Object Identifier" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

André Marie Constant Duméril
André Marie Constant Duméril
André Marie Constant Duméril
(January 1, 1774 – August 14, 1860) was a French zoologist. He was professor of anatomy at the Muséum national d'histoire naturelle from 1801 to 1812, when he became professor of herpetology and ichthyology. His son Auguste Duméril
Auguste Duméril
was also a zoologist. Contents1 Life 2 Species
Species
named after A.M.C. Duméril 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksLife[edit] André Marie Constant Duméril
André Marie Constant Duméril
was born on January 1, 1774 in Amiens and died on August 14, 1860 in Paris. He became a doctor at a young age, obtaining, at 19 years, the “prévot” of anatomy at the Medical school of Rouen
[...More...]

"André Marie Constant Duméril" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
[...More...]

"International Standard Book Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Chondrostei
Acipenseriformes Polypteriformes Chondrostei
Chondrostei
are primarily cartilaginous fish showing some degree of ossification. It is thought that the cartilaginous condition is derived, and that the ancestors of this group were bony fish with fully ossified skeletons. Members of this group share with the Elasmobranchii
Elasmobranchii
certain features such as the possession of spiracles, a heterocercal tail and the absence of scales. Nevertheless, the fossil record suggests they have more in common with the teleosts
[...More...]

"Chondrostei" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mucous Membrane
A mucous membrane or mucosa is a membrane that lines various cavities in the body and covers the surface of internal organs. It consists of one or more layers of epithelial cells overlying a layer of loose connective tissue. It is mostly of endodermal origin and is continuous with the skin at various body openings such as the eyes, ears, inside the nose, inside the mouth, lip, the urethral opening and the anus. Some mucous membranes secrete mucus, a thick protective fluid
[...More...]

"Mucous Membrane" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Typhlosole
A typhlosole is an internal fold of the intestine or intestine inner wall. Typhlosoles occur in bivalve mollusks, lampreys and some annelids and echinoderms. In earthworms, it is a dorsal flap of the intestine that runs along most of its length, effectively forming a tube within a tube, and increasing the absorption area by that of its inner surface. Its function is to increase intestine surface area for more efficient absorption of digested nutrients. In different earthworm families, the typhlosole appears to have multiple origins. The Lumbricidae, for example, have a typhlosole which is an infolding of all layers of the intestine wall, whereas in some other families (e.g
[...More...]

"Typhlosole" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Animal
Animals are multicellular eukaryotic organisms that form the biological kingdom Animalia. With few exceptions, animals consume organic material, breathe oxygen, are able to move, reproduce sexually, and grow from a hollow sphere of cells, the blastula, during embryonic development. Over 1.5 million living animal species have been described—of which around 1 million are insects—but it has been estimated there are over 7 million in total. Animals range in size from 8.5 millionths of a metre to 33.6 metres (110 ft) long and have complex interactions with each other and their environments, forming intricate food webs. The study of animals is called zoology. Aristotle divided animals into those with blood and those without. Carl Linnaeus
Carl Linnaeus
created the first hierarchical biological classification for animals in 1758 with his Systema Naturae, which Jean-Baptiste Lamarck expanded into 14 phyla by 1809
[...More...]

"Animal" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Taxon
In biology, a taxon (plural taxa; back-formation from taxonomy) is a group of one or more populations of an organism or organisms seen by taxonomists to form a unit. Although neither is required, a taxon is usually known by a particular name and given a particular ranking, especially if and when it is accepted or becomes established. It is not uncommon, however, for taxonomists to remain at odds over what belongs to a taxon and the criteria used for inclusion
[...More...]

"Taxon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Paraphyletic
In taxonomy, a group is paraphyletic if it consists of the group's last common ancestor and all descendants of that ancestor excluding a few—typically only one or two—monophyletic subgroups. The group is said to be paraphyletic with respect to the excluded subgroups. The arrangement of the members of a paraphyletic group is called a paraphyly. The term is commonly used in phylogenetics (a subfield of biology) and in linguistics. The term was coined to apply to well-known taxa like Reptilia (reptiles) which, as commonly named and traditionally defined, is paraphyletic with respect to mammals and birds. Reptilia contains the last common ancestor of reptiles and all descendants of that ancestor—including all extant reptiles as well as the extinct synapsids—except for mammals and birds. Other commonly recognized paraphyletic groups include fish, monkeys and lizards.[1] If many subgroups are missing from the named group, it is said to be polyparaphyletic
[...More...]

"Paraphyletic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Stereocilia
Stereocilia
Stereocilia
(or stereovilli) are non-motile apical modifications of the cell, which are distinct from cilia and microvilli, but closely related to the latter. In structure, they are longer than typical microvilli, and have more of the characteristics of the cellular membrane proper. Like microvilli, they contain actin filaments, distinguishing them from microtubule-containing cilia. They are found in three regions of the body:the ductus deferens the epididymis (see stereocilia (epididymis) for more details). Some sources consider epididymal stereocilia to be a variant of microvilli,[1] rather than their own distinct type of structure. the sensory (hair) cells of the inner ear (see stereocilia (inner ear) for more details)References[edit]^ Krause J. William (July 2005). Krause's Essential Human Histology for Medical Students. Universal-Publishers. pp. 37–. ISBN 978-1-58112-468-2
[...More...]

"Stereocilia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Semicircular Canal
The semicircular canals or semicircular ducts are three semicircular, interconnected tubes located in the innermost part of each ear, the inner ear. The three canals are the horizontal, superior and posterior semicircular canals.Contents1 Structure1.1 Horizontal semicircular canal 1.2 Superior semicircular canal 1.3 Posterior semicircular canal 1.4 Development2 Function 3 History 4 See also 5 References 6 Additional images 7 External linksStructure[edit] The semicircular canals are a component of the bony labyrinth. At one end of each of the semicircular canals is a dilated sac called an osseous ampulla which is more than twice the diameter of the canal. Each ampulla contains an ampulla crest, the crista ampullaris which consists of a thick gelatinous cap called a cupula and many hair cells. The superior and posterior semicircular canals are oriented vertically at right angles to each other. The lateral semicircular canal is about a 30-degree angle from the horizontal plane
[...More...]

"Semicircular Canal" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ontogeny
Ontogeny
Ontogeny
(also ontogenesis or morphogenesis) is the origination and development of an organism, usually from the time of fertilization of the egg to the organism's mature form—although the term can be used to refer to the study of the entirety of an organism's lifespan. Ontogeny
Ontogeny
is the developmental history of an organism within its own lifetime, as distinct from phylogeny, which refers to the evolutionary history of a species. In practice, writers on evolution often speak of species as "developing" traits or characteristics. This can be misleading. While developmental (i.e., ontogenetic) processes can influence subsequent evolutionary (e.g., phylogenetic) processes[1] (see evolutionary developmental biology), individual organisms develop (ontogeny), while species evolve (phylogeny). Ontogeny, embryology and developmental biology are closely related studies and the terms are sometimes used interchangeably
[...More...]

"Ontogeny" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.