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Cyclops (computer System)
Cyclops is a computer system co-invented by the British inventor Bill Carlton of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Margaret Parnis England of Malta,[1] which is used on the ATP and WTA professional tennis tours as an electronic line judge to help determine whether a serve is in or out. The system, which must be activated by the service line umpire before each serve, projects five or six infra-red horizontal beams of light along the court 10 mm above the ground. One beam covers the good (short) side of the service line and others cover the fault (long) side. If a served ball hits the first beam, the other beams are turned off, while a long serve will break one of the other beams. A long serve is indicated by an audible signal. Obvious long serves that go beyond Cyclops' beams are called by the service line umpire. The system is tuned before and during each tournament by a representative of the company which rents the system
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Great Britain
Great Britain, also known as Britain, is a large island in the north Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
off the northwest coast of continental Europe. With an area of 209,331 km2 (80,823 sq mi), Great Britain
Great Britain
is the largest of the British Isles, the largest European island, and the ninth-largest island in the world.[5][note 1] In 2011 the island had a population of about 61 million people, making it the world's third-most populous island after Java
Java
in Indonesia and Honshu
Honshu
in Japan.[7][8] The island of Ireland
Ireland
is situated to the west of it, and together these islands, along with over 1,000 smaller surrounding islands, form the British Isles
British Isles
archipelago.[9] The island is dominated by a maritime climate with quite narrow temperature differences between seasons
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US Open (tennis)
Open
Open
or OPEN may refer to: Recorded music[edit] Open
Open
(band), Australian pop/rock band The
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Drop Shot
Drop Shot is a murder mystery by Harlan Coben. It is the second novel featuring Myron Bolitar. It was published in 1996. Plot[edit] A young woman is shot in cold blood, her lifeless body dumped outside the stadium at the height of the US Open. At one point, her tennis career had skyrocketed. Now headlines were being made by a different young player from the wrong side of the tracks. When Myron Bolitar investigates the killing, he uncovers a connection between the two players and a six-year-old murder at an exclusive club. Suddenly, Myron is in over his head. And with a dirty senator, a jealous mother, and the mob all drawn into the case, he finds himself playing the most dangerous game of all. Main characters[edit]Myron Bolitar : Ex-basketball player, currently works as sports agent
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New York Times
The New York Times
The New York Times
(sometimes abbreviated as The NYT or The Times) is an American newspaper based in New York City
New York City
with worldwide influence and readership.[6][7][8] Founded in 1851, the paper has won 122 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other newspaper.[9][10] As of September 2016, it had the largest combined print-and-digital circulation of any daily newspaper in the United States.[11] The New York Times is ranked 18th in the world by circulation. The paper is owned by The New York Times
The New York Times
Company, which is publicly traded but primarily controlled by the Ochs-Sulzberger family through a dual-class share structure.[12] It has been owned by the family since 1896; A.G
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The Independent
The Independent
The Independent
is a British online newspaper.[2] Established in 1986 as an independent national morning newspaper published in London, it was controlled by Tony O'Reilly's Independent News & Media from 1997 until it was sold to Russian oligarch
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Ilie Năstase
Ilie "Nasty" Năstase (Romanian pronunciation: [iˈli.e nəsˈtase] ( listen), born 19 July 1946) is a Romanian former world No. 1 professional tennis player, and one of the world's top players of the 1970s. He was ranked world No. 1 from 23 August 1973 to 2 June 1974. Năstase is one of the ten players in history who have won more than 100 ATP professional titles (58 singles and 45 in doubles).[3] He was inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame
International Tennis Hall of Fame
in 1991. Năstase won seven Grand Slam titles: two in singles, three in men's doubles and two in mixed doubles
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BBC
The British Broadcasting
Broadcasting
Corporation (BBC) is a British public service broadcaster. Its headquarters are at Broadcasting House
Broadcasting House
in Westminster, London
London
and it is the world's oldest national broadcasting organisation[3] and the largest broadcaster in the world by number of employees
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Infra-red
Infrared
Infrared
radiation (IR) is electromagnetic radiation (EMR) with longer wavelengths than those of visible light, and is therefore generally invisible to the human eye (although IR at wavelengths up to 1050 nm from specially pulsed lasers can be seen by humans under certain conditions [1][2][3][4]). It is sometimes called infrared light. IR wavelengths extend from the nominal red edge of the visible spectrum at 700 nanometers (frequency 430 THz), to 1 millimeter (300 GHz)[5] Most of the thermal radiation emitted by objects near room temperature is infrared
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Lob (tennis)
A lob in tennis (also called Great Horse, in Italian Cavallone) is hitting the ball high and deep into the opponent's court. It can be used as an offensive or defensive weapon depending on the situation. History[edit] A lob is usually hit when an opponent is standing near the net, waiting to volley. The ball should sail over the top of the opponent and into the open court behind him or her. A good offensive lob cannot be reached by the opponent, yet it is low enough and has enough pace so that the opponent can not run back and chase it down. It can win the point outright, although with some risks involved. Topspin
Topspin
greatly enhances the effectiveness of offensive lob but also makes the stroke more difficult. When executing the lob, players usually hit the ball at an angle between 0 degrees (flat) and 45 degrees (diagonal)
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Tennis Shots
In tennis, there are a variety of types of shots (ways of hitting the ball) which can be categorized in various ways. The grip you place on will help you have different types of shots, the lower your grip means that the ball is most likely going to be a ground stroke. According to William T. Tilden, "All tennis strokes, should be made with the body' at right angles to the net, with the shoulders lined up parallel to the line of flight of the ball [1]." The serve is the opening shot of a point. Groundstrokes are hit after the ball has already bounced, and can be either forehands or backhands depending on which direction the racket is swung relative to the body. A lob is a groundstroke hit well over the head of an opponent who is positioned at the net. A passing shot is a groundstroke that is hit out of reach of an opponent at the net far to his left or right
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Official (tennis)
In tennis, an official is a person who ensures that a match or tournament is conducted according to the International Tennis Federation Rules of Tennis
Tennis
and other competition regulations.[1] At the highest levels of the sport, a team of up to eleven officials may be on court at any given time.[2] These officials are broken up into categories based on their responsibility during the match. Contrastingly, many tennis matches are conducted with no officials present directly on court.Contents1 Certification 2 Chair umpire 3 Line umpire 4 Off-court officials4.1 Referee 4.2 Chief umpire5 List of ITF Gold Badge chair umpires5.1 Women 5.2 Men6 See also 7 ReferencesCertification[edit] Tennis
Tennis
officials are certified by their respective national association
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Tennis Technology
Since the sport's inception, the design and manufacture of tennis equipment has been affected by technological advances and regulations. As is common in major sports, regulations became more exacting over time, with improvements affecting the qualities of the tennis racket and the tennis ball.Contents1 Rackets1.1 Materials 1.2 1980s graphite introduction 1.3 Strings2 Balls 3 ReferencesRackets[edit] Main article: Racket (sports equipment) § Tennis As materials improved, becoming lighter and stronger, rackets were made larger, accordingly. Larger rackets have more surface area, making them easier for many players to return a ball. Sizes are:Mid: 93 square inches (600 cm2) and below Mid-plus: 94–105 square inches (610–680 cm2) Oversized: 106–122 square inches (680–790 cm2) Super-oversized: 122 square inches (790 cm2) and largerThe balance point and grip size of a racket changed as technology progressed
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Tennis Court
A tennis court is the venue where the sport of tennis is played. It is a firm rectangular surface with a low net stretched across the center. The same surface can be used to play both doubles and singles matches. A variety of surfaces can be used to create a tennis court, each with its own characteristics which affect the playing style of the game.Contents1 Dimensions 2 Surfaces2.1 Clay
Clay
courts 2.2 Grass courts 2.3 Hard courts 2.4 Carpet courts3 Indoor courts 4 Smaller courts 5 Terminology 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksDimensions[edit]The dimensions of a tennis court. Tennis
Tennis
is played on a rectangular flat surface, usually of grass, clay or hard material. The dimensions of a tennis court are defined and regulated by the International Tennis
Tennis
Federation (ITF) governing body and are written down in the annual 'Rules of Tennis' document.[1] The court is 78 feet (23.77 metres) long
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Carpet Court
A carpet court is a type of tennis court. The International Tennis Federation defines carpet courts as a "textile surface of woven or non-woven nylon, or a polymeric or rubber material, typically supplied in rolls or sheets" and as a removable surface.[1] It is one of the fastest court types second only to grass courts.[2] The use of carpet courts in major professional competitions ended in 2009 to reduce injuries.[3] Types[edit] There are two types of carpet court. The most common outdoor version consists of artificial turf infilled with sand
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Clay Court
A clay court is one of many different types of tennis court. Clay courts are made of crushed shale, stone, brick, or other unbound mineral aggregates. The French Open
French Open
uses clay courts, making it unique among the Grand Slam tournaments. Clay courts are more common in Continental Europe and Latin America than in the United States, Canada or Britain. Two main types exist: red clay, the more common variety, and green clay, also known as "rubico", which is a harder surface. Although less expensive to construct than other types of tennis courts, the maintenance costs of clay are high as the surface must be rolled to preserve flatness
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