HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Cyclonic Storm
In meteorology, a cyclone is a large scale air mass that rotates around a strong center of low atmospheric pressure.[1][2] Cyclones are characterized by inward spiraling winds that rotate about a zone of low pressure.[3][4] The largest low-pressure systems are polar vortices and extratropical cyclones of the largest scale (the synoptic scale). Warm-core cyclones such as tropical cyclones and subtropical cyclones also lie within the synoptic scale.[5] Mesocyclones, tornadoes and dust devils lie within the smaller mesoscale.[6] Upper level cyclones can exist without the presence of a surface low, and can pinch off from the base of the tropical upper tropospheric trough during the summer months in the Northern Hemisphere
[...More...]

"Cyclonic Storm" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Cyclone (other)
A cyclone is an area of closed, circular fluid motion characterized by inwardly spiraling winds. Cyclone
Cyclone
may also refer to:Contents1 Places 2 Technology 3 Music 4 Films 5 Games 6 Comics 7 Military and related areas 8 Transportation8.1 Land 8.2 Air9 Roller coasters 10 Sports teams10.1 Australia 10.2 Canada 10.3 United States 10.4 Elsewhere11 Other uses 12 See alsoPlaces[edit]Cyclone, Indiana, an unincorporated community Cyclone, Kentucky, an unincorporated community Cyclone, Missouri, an unincorporated community Cyc
[...More...]

"Cyclone (other)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Tropical Cyclogenesis
Tropical cyclogenesis
Tropical cyclogenesis
is the development and strengthening of a tropical cyclone in the atmosphere.[1] The mechanisms through which tropical cyclogenesis occurs are distinctly different from those through which mid-latitude cyclogenesis occurs. Tropical cyclogenesis involves the development of a warm-core cyclone, due to significant convection in a favorable atmospheric environment.[2] There are six main requirements for tropical cyclogenesis: sufficiently warm sea surface temperatures (at least 26.5°C [80°F]), atmospheric instability, high humidity in the lower to middle levels of the troposphere, enough Coriolis force
Coriolis force
to develop a low pressure center, a preexisting low-level focus or disturbance, and low vertical wind shear.[3] Tropical cyclones tend to develop during the summer, but have been noted in nearly every month in most basins
[...More...]

"Tropical Cyclogenesis" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Meteorological Phenomenon
A meteorological phenomenon is a weather event that can be explained by the principles of meteorology. Such events include:Acid rain Air mass Anticyclone Arctic cyclone Ball lightning Clouds Crow instability Derecho Diamond dust Drought Dust devil Dust storm El Niño Extratropical cyclone Foehn wind Hail Halo Heat wave Hurricane Ice crystals Ice pellets Indian summer Kelvin–Helmholtz instability La Niña Lake-effect snow Light pillar Lightning Mesocyclone Morning Glory cloud Novaya Zemlya effect Rain Rain
Rain
and snow mixed Rainbow Rain
Rain
of animals Sleet; see Ice pellets
Ice pellets
and Rain
Rain
and snow mixed Snow Squall St
[...More...]

"Meteorological Phenomenon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Thunderstorm
A thunderstorm, also known as an electrical storm, lightning storm, or thundershower, is a storm characterized by the presence of lightning and its acoustic effect on the Earth's atmosphere, known as thunder.[1] Thunderstorms occur in association with a type of cloud known as a cumulonimbus. They are usually accompanied by strong winds, heavy rain, and sometimes snow, sleet, hail, or, in contrast, no precipitation at all. Thunderstorms may line up in a series or become a rainband, known as a squall line. Strong or severe thunderstorms include some of the most dangerous weather phenomena, including large hail, strong winds, and tornadoes. Some of the most persistent severe thunderstorms, known as supercells, rotate as do cyclones
[...More...]

"Thunderstorm" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Severe Weather
Severe weather
Severe weather
refers to any dangerous meteorological phenomena with the potential to cause damage, serious social disruption, or loss of human life.[1] Types of severe weather phenomena vary, depending on the latitude, altitude, topography, and atmospheric conditions
[...More...]

"Severe Weather" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Squall Line
A squall line (also known as a quasi-linear convective system or QLCS) is a line of thunderstorms forming along or ahead of a cold front. In the early 20th century, the term was used as a synonym for cold front. It contains heavy precipitation, hail, frequent lightning, strong straight-line winds, and possibly tornadoes and waterspouts. Strong straight-line winds can occur where the squall line is in the shape of a bow echo. Tornadoes can occur along waves within a line echo wave pattern (LEWP), where mesoscale low-pressure areas are present. Some bow echoes which develop within the summer season are known as derechos, and they move quite fast through large sections of territory
[...More...]

"Squall Line" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Dry Line
A dry line (also called a dew point line, or Marfa front, after Marfa, Texas)[1] is an imaginary line across a continent that separates moist air from an eastern body of water and dry desert air from the west. One of the most prominent examples of such a separation occurs in central North America, especially Texas, Oklahoma, and Kansas, where the moist air from the Gulf of Mexico
Gulf of Mexico
meets dry air from the desert south-western states. The dry line is an important factor in severe weather frequency in the Great Plains
Great Plains
of North America
[...More...]

"Dry Line" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Warm Front
A warm front is a density discontinuity located at the leading edge of a homogeneous warm air mass, and is typically located on the equator-facing edge of an isotherm gradient. Warm fronts lie within broader troughs of low pressure than cold fronts, and move more slowly than the cold fronts which usually follow because cold air is denser and less easy to remove from the Earth's surface.[1] This also forces temperature differences across warm fronts to be broader in scale. Clouds ahead of the warm front are mostly stratiform, and rainfall gradually increases as the front approaches. Fog
Fog
can also occur preceding a warm frontal passage. Clearing and warming is usually rapid after frontal passage. If the warm air mass is unstable, thunderstorms may be embedded among the stratiform clouds ahead of the front, and after frontal passage thundershowers may continue
[...More...]

"Warm Front" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Stratus Cloud
Stratus clouds are low-level clouds characterized by horizontal layering with a uniform base, as opposed to convective or cumuliform clouds that are formed by rising thermals. More specifically, the term stratus is used to describe flat, hazy, featureless clouds of low altitude varying in color from dark gray to nearly white.[1] The word "stratus" comes from the Latin
Latin
prefix "strato-", meaning "layer".[2] Stratus clouds may produce a light drizzle or a small amount of snow. These clouds are essentially above-ground fog formed either through the lifting of morning fog or through cold air moving at low altitudes over a region. Some call these clouds "high fog" for the fog-like cloud
[...More...]

"Stratus Cloud" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Precipitation (meteorology)
In meteorology, precipitation is any product of the condensation of atmospheric water vapor that falls under gravity.[2] The main forms of precipitation include drizzle, rain, sleet, snow, graupel and hail. Precipitation
Precipitation
occurs when a portion of the atmosphere becomes saturated with water vapor, so that the water condenses and "precipitates". Thus, fog and mist are not precipitation but suspensions, because the water vapor does not condense sufficiently to precipitate. Two processes, possibly acting together, can lead to air becoming saturated: cooling the air or adding water vapor to the air. Precipitation
Precipitation
forms as smaller droplets coalesce via collision with other rain drops or ice crystals within a cloud
[...More...]

"Precipitation (meteorology)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Fog
Fog
Fog
consists of visible cloud water droplets or ice crystals suspended in the air at or near the Earth's surface.[1] Fog
Fog
can be considered a type of low-lying cloud and is heavily influenced by nearby bodies of water, topography, and wind conditions
[...More...]

"Fog" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Geographical Pole
A geographical pole is either of the two points on a rotating body (planet, dwarf planet, natural satellite, sphere...etc) where its axis of rotation intersects its surface.[1] As with Earth's North and South Poles, they are usually called that body's "north pole" and "south pole", one lying 90 degrees in one direction from the body's equator and the other lying 90 degrees in the opposite direction from the equator. Every planet has geographical poles.[2] If, like the Earth, a body generates a magnetic field, it will also possess magnetic poles.[3] Perturbations in a body's rotation mean that geographical poles wander slightly on its surface
[...More...]

"Geographical Pole" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Waterspout
A waterspout is an intense columnar vortex (usually appearing as a funnel-shaped cloud) that occurs over a body of water
[...More...]

"Waterspout" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Humidity
Humidity
Humidity
is the amount of water vapor present in the air. Water vapor is the gaseous state of water and is invisible to the human eye.[1] Humidity
Humidity
indicates the likelihood of precipitation, dew, or fog. Higher humidity reduces the effectiveness of sweating in cooling the body by reducing the rate of evaporation of moisture from the skin. This effect is calculated in a heat index table or humidex. The amount of water vapor that is needed to achieve saturation increases as the temperature increases. As the temperature of a parcel of water becomes lower it will eventually reach the point of saturation without adding or losing water mass. The differences in the amount of water vapor in a parcel of air can be quite large
[...More...]

"Humidity" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Wind Shear
Wind
Wind
shear (or windshear), sometimes referred to as wind gradient, is a difference in wind speed and/or direction over a relatively short distance in the atmosphere. Atmospheric wind shear is normally described as either vertical or horizontal wind shear. Vertical wind shear is a change in wind speed or direction with change in altitude. Horizontal wind shear is a change in wind speed with change in lateral position for a given altitude.[1] Wind
Wind
shear is a microscale meteorological phenomenon occurring over a very small distance, but it can be associated with mesoscale or synoptic scale weather features such as squall lines and cold fronts. It is commonly observed near microbursts and downbursts caused by thunderstorms, fronts, areas of locally higher low-level winds referred to as low level jets, near mountains, radiation inversions that occur due to clear skies and calm winds, buildings, wind turbines, and sailboats
[...More...]

"Wind Shear" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.