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Cyborgs
A cyborg (short for "cybernetic organism") is a being with both organic and biomechatronic body parts. The term was coined in 1960 by Manfred Clynes
Manfred Clynes
and Nathan S. Kline.[1] The term cyborg is not the same thing as bionic, biorobot or android; it applies to an organism that has restored function or enhanced abilities due to the integration of some artificial component or technology that relies on some sort of feedback.[2] While cyborgs are commonly thought of as mammals, including humans, they might also conceivably be any kind of organism. D. S
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Cyborg (other)
A cyborg is a cybernetic organism. Cyborg
Cyborg
may also refer to:Contents1 People 2 Comics 3 Games 4 Film and television 5 Music 6 Novels 7 Other usesPeople[edit]Cyborg, nom de guerre of Evangelista Santos
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Darth Vader
Darth Vader, also known by his birth name Anakin Skywalker, is a fictional character in the Star Wars
Star Wars
franchise.[3][4][5] Vader appears in the original span of the saga going from being Anakin Skywalker, the prophesied child who would bring balance to the Force, to his corruption and transformation into Darth Vader, to being the pivotal antagonist, and eventual redemption and fulfillment of the prophecy. The character was created by George Lucas
George Lucas
and has been portrayed by numerous actors. His appearances span the first six Star Wars
Star Wars
films, as well as Rogue One, and his character is referenced in both Star Wars: The Force Awakens and Star Wars: The Last Jedi. He is also an important character in the Star Wars
Star Wars
expanded universe of television series, video games, novels, literature and comic books
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Bionics
Bionics
Bionics
is the application of biological methods and systems found in nature to the study and design of engineering systems and modern technology.[1] The word bionic was coined by Jack E. Steele in 1958, possibly originating from the technical term bion (pronounced BEE-on; from Ancient Greek: βίος), meaning 'unit of life' and the suffix -ic, meaning 'like' or 'in the manner of', hence 'like life'. Some dictionaries, however, explain the word as being formed as a portmanteau from biology and electronics.[2] It was popularized by the 1970s U.S. television series The Six Million Dollar Man
The Six Million Dollar Man
and The Bionic Woman, both based upon the novel Cyborg
Cyborg
by Martin Caidin, which was itself influenced by Steele's work
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Manfred Clynes
Manfred Clynes
Manfred Clynes
(born August 14, 1925) is a scientist, inventor, and musician. He is best known for his innovations and discoveries in the interpretation of music, and for his contributions to the study of biological systems and neurophysiology.Contents1 Overview1.1 Emotion shapes, biologic primacy laws 1.2 Sentic cycles 1.3 Cyborg
Cyborg
(cybernetic organism)2 Biography and career2.1 Education and influences2.1.1 Early invention of inertial guidance at age 15 2.1.2 Concert tours in 1953 Goldberg Variations2.2 Inventions and scientific discoveries2.2.1 CAT computer 2.2.2 URS law2.3 Towards synthesis of scientific and musical work2.3.1 Color and the brain2.4 The brain as an output device2.4.1 Predictive amplitude shaping in music 2.4.2 Composers' pulses 2.4.3 SuperConductor3 ReferencesOverview[edit] Manfred Clynes' work combines music and science, more particularly, neurophysiology and neuroscience
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Bionic
Bionics
Bionics
is the application of biological methods and systems found in nature to the study and design of engineering systems and modern technology.[1] The word bionic was coined by Jack E. Steele in 1958, possibly originating from the technical term bion (pronounced BEE-on; from Ancient Greek: βίος), meaning 'unit of life' and the suffix -ic, meaning 'like' or 'in the manner of', hence 'like life'. Some dictionaries, however, explain the word as being formed as a portmanteau from biology and electronics.[2] It was popularized by the 1970s U.S. television series The Six Million Dollar Man
The Six Million Dollar Man
and The Bionic Woman, both based upon the novel Cyborg
Cyborg
by Martin Caidin, which was itself influenced by Steele's work
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Biorobot
Biorobotics
Biorobotics
is a term that loosely covers the fields of cybernetics, bionics and even genetic engineering as a collective study. Biorobotics
Biorobotics
is often used to refer to a real subfield of robotics: studying how to make robots that emulate or simulate living biological organisms mechanically or even chemically. The term is also used in a reverse definition: making biological organisms as manipulatable and functional as robots, or making biological organisms as components of robots. In the latter sense, biorobotics can be referred to as a theoretical discipline of comprehensive genetic engineering in which organisms are created and designed by artificial means. The creation of life from non-living matter for example, would be biorobotics
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Feedback
Collective intelligence Collective action Self-organized criticality Herd mentality Phase transition Agent-based modelling Synchronization Ant colony optimization Particle swarm optimization Swarm behaviourNetworks Scale-free networks Social network analysis Small-world networks Community identification Centrality Motifs Graph Theory Scaling Robustness Systems biology Dynamic networks Adaptive networks Evolution
Evolution
and adaptation Artificial neural networks Evolutionary computation Genetic algorithms Genetic programming Artificial life Machine learning Evolutionary developmental biology Artificial intelligence Evolutionary robo
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Mammal
Mammals are the vertebrates within the class Mammalia (/məˈmeɪliə/ from Latin mamma "breast"), a clade of endothermic amniotes distinguished from reptiles (including birds) by the possession of a neocortex (a region of the brain), hair, three middle ear bones, and mammary glands. Females of all mammal species nurse their young with milk, secreted from the mammary glands. Mammals include the largest animal on the planet, the blue whale. The basic body type is a terrestrial quadruped, but some mammals are adapted for life at sea, in the air, in trees, underground or on two legs. The largest group of mammals, the placentals, have a placenta, which enables the feeding of the fetus during gestation. Mammals range in size from the 30–40 mm (1.2–1.6 in) bumblebee bat to the 30-meter (98 ft) blue whale. With the exception of the five species of monotreme (egg-laying mammals), all modern mammals give birth to live young
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Doctor Who
Doctor Who
Doctor Who
is a British science-fiction television programme produced by the BBC
BBC
since 1963. The programme depicts the adventures of a Time Lord called "the Doctor", an extraterrestrial being from the planet Gallifrey. The Doctor explores the universe in a time-travelling space ship called the TARDIS. Its exterior appears as a blue British police box, which was a common sight in Britain in 1963 when the series first aired. Accompanied by a number of companions, the Doctor combats a variety of foes, while working to save civilisations and help people in need. The show is a significant part of British popular culture,[1][2] and elsewhere it has gained a cult following. It has influenced generations of British television professionals, many of whom grew up watching the series.[3] The programme originally ran from 1963 to 1989
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Borg (Star Trek)
The Borg are a fictional alien group that appear as recurring antagonists in the Star Trek
Star Trek
franchise. The Borg are a vast collection of "drones", or cybernetic organisms, linked in a hive mind called "the Collective" or "the Hive". The Borg co-opt the technology and knowledge of other alien species to the Collective through the process of "assimilation": forcibly transforming individual beings into drones by injecting microscopic machines, or nanoprobes, into their bodies and surgically augmenting them with cybernetic components. The Borg's ultimate goal is "achieving perfection".[1] Aside from being recurring antagonists in The Next Generation television series, they are depicted as the main threat in the film Star Trek: First Contact. In addition, they played major roles in the Voyager series and serve as the way home to the Alpha Quadrant for the isolated Federation starship USS Voyager
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Star Wars
Trilogies:Original trilogy:IV – A New Hope (1977) V – The Empire Strikes Back
The Empire Strikes Back
(1980) VI – Return of the Jedi
Return of the Jedi
(1983)Prequel trilogy:I – The Phantom Menace (1999) II – Attack of the Clones (2002) III – Revenge of the
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Organism
In biology, an organism (from Greek: οργανισμός, organismos) is any individual entity that exhibits the properties of life. It is a synonym for "life form". Organisms are classified by taxonomy into specified groups such as the multicellular animals, plants, and fungi; or unicellular microorganisms such as a protists, bacteria, and archaea.[1] All types of organisms are capable of reproduction, growth and development, maintenance, and some degree of response to stimuli. Humans are multicellular animals composed of many trillions of cells which differentiate during development into specialized tissues and organs. An organism may be either a prokaryote or a eukaryote. Prokaryotes are represented by two separate domains—bacteria and archaea
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Free Will
Free will
Free will
is the ability to choose between different possible courses of action unimpeded.[1][2] Free will
Free will
is closely linked to the concepts of responsibility, praise, guilt, sin, and other judgements which apply only to actions that are freely chosen. It is also connected with the concepts of advice, persuasion, deliberation, and prohibition. Traditionally, only actions that are freely willed are seen as deserving credit or blame. There are numerous different concerns about threats to the possibility of free will, varying by how exactly it is conceived, which is a matter of some debate. Some conceive free will to be the capacity to make choices in which the outcome has not been determined by past events. Determinism suggests that only one course of events is possible, which is inconsistent with the existence of free will thus conceived
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Human Race
Homo
Homo
sapiens idaltu White et al., 2003 Homo
Homo
sapiens sapiens Homo
Homo
sapiens population densitySynonyms Species
Species
synonymy[1]aethiopicus Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 americanus Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 arabicus Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 aurignacensis Klaatsch & Hauser, 1910 australasicus Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 cafer Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 capensis Broom, 1917 columbicus Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 cro-magnonensis Gregory, 1921 drennani Kleinschmidt, 1931 eurafricanus (Sergi, 1911) grimaldiensis Gregory, 1921 grimaldii Lapouge, 1906 hottentotus Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 hyperboreus Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 indicus Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 japeticus Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 melaninus Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 monstrosus Linnaeus, 1758 neptunianus Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 palestinus McCown & Keith, 1932 patagonus Bory de St
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Artificial Pacemaker
A pacemaker (or artificial pacemaker, so as not to be confused with the heart's natural pacemaker) is a medical device that generates electrical impulses delivered by electrodes to contract the heart muscles and regulate the electrical conduction system of the heart. The primary purpose of a pacemaker is to maintain an adequate heart rate, either because the heart's natural pacemaker is not fast enough, or because there is a block in the heart's electrical conductive system. Modern pacemakers are externally programmable and allow a cardiologist to select the optimum pacing modes for individual patients. Some combine a pacemaker and defibrillator in a single implantable device
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