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Cuts Of Guilt, Cuts Deeper
Cuts of Guilt, Cuts Deeper
Cuts of Guilt, Cuts Deeper
is a collaborative studio album by the Japanese noise musician Merzbow, Swedish saxophonist Mats Gustafsson, Hungarian drummer Balázs Pándi, and American guitarist Thurston Moore. Merzbow, Gustafsson, and Pándi have frequently played together as a trio, and released the album Cuts in 2013. Merzbow
Merzbow
and Gustafsson also played together with Moore on the Sonic Youth
Sonic Youth
album SYR8: Andre Sider Af Sonic Youth. It was recorded on April 13, 2014 at a skatepark / recording studio in Wembley, London, England
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Album
An album is a collection of audio recordings issued as a single item on CD, record, audio tape or another medium. Albums of recorded music were developed in the early 20th century, first as books of individual 78rpm records, then from 1948 as vinyl LP records played at ​33 1⁄3 rpm. Vinyl LPs are still issued, though in the 21st-century album sales have mostly focused on compact disc (CD) and MP3
MP3
formats. However, vinyl sales have been on the rise in recent years.[1] The audio cassette was a format used alongside vinyl from the 1970s into the first decade of the 2000s. An album may be recorded in a recording studio (fixed or mobile), in a concert venue, at home, in the field, or a mix of places. The time frame for completely recording an album varies between a few hours and several years. This process usually requires several takes with different parts recorded separately, and then brought or "mixed" together
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Recording Studio
A recording studio is a specialized facility for sound recording, mixing, and audio production of instrumental or vocal musical performances, spoken words, and other sounds. They range in size from a small in-home project studio large enough to record a single singer-guitarist, to a large building with space for a full orchestra of 100 or more musicians. Ideally both the recording and monitoring (listening and mixing) spaces are specially designed by an acoustician or audio engineer to achieve optimum acoustic properties (acoustic isolation or diffusion or absorption of reflected sound echoes that could otherwise interfere with the sound heard by the listener). Recording studios may be used to record singers, instrumental musicians (e.g., electric guitar, piano, saxophone, or ensembles such as orchestras), voice-over artists for advertisements or dialogue replacement in film, television, or animation, foley, or to record their accompanying musical soundtracks
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MusicBrainz
MusicBrainz
MusicBrainz
is a project that aims to create an open data music database that is similar to the freedb project. MusicBrainz
MusicBrainz
was founded in response to the restrictions placed on the Compact Disc Database (CDDB), a database for software applications to look up audio CD (compact disc) information on the Internet. MusicBrainz
MusicBrainz
has expanded its goals to reach beyond a compact disc metadata (this is information about the performers, artists, songwriters, etc.) storehouse to become a structured open online database for music.[5][6] MusicBrainz
MusicBrainz
captures information about artists, their recorded works, and the relationships between them. Recorded works entries capture at a minimum the album title, track titles, and the length of each track. These entries are maintained by volunteer editors who follow community written style guidelines
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Discogs
Discogs
Discogs
(short for discographies) is a website and crowdsourced database of information about audio recordings, including commercial releases, promotional releases, and bootleg or off-label releases. The Discogs
Discogs
servers, currently hosted under the domain name discogs.com, are owned by Zink Media, Inc., and are located in Portland, Oregon, US. While the site lists releases in all genres and on all formats, it is especially known as the largest online database of electronic music releases, and of releases on vinyl media
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JazzTimes
JazzTimes
JazzTimes
is an American magazine devoted to jazz. Published 10 times a year, it was founded in Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C.
in 1970[1] by Ira Davidson Sabin (born 1928) as a newsletter called Radio Free Jazz
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Gramophone Record
A phonograph record (also known as a gramophone record, especially in British English, or record) is an analog sound storage medium in the form of a flat disc with an inscribed, modulated spiral groove. The groove usually starts near the periphery and ends near the center of the disc. At first, the discs were commonly made from shellac; starting in the 1950s polyvinyl chloride became common. In recent decades, records have sometimes been called vinyl records, or simply vinyl, although this would exclude most records made until after World War II. The phonograph disc record was the primary medium used for music reproduction until late in the 20th century. It had co-existed with the phonograph cylinder from the late 1880s and had effectively superseded it by around 1912. Records retained the largest market share even when new formats such as the compact cassette were mass-marketed
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High-resolution Audio
High-resolution audio, also known as High-definition audio or HD audio, is a marketing term used by some recorded-music retailers and high-fidelity sound reproduction equipment vendors.[1][2] It refers to higher than 44.1 kHz sample rate and/or higher than 16-bit linear bit depth
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FLAC
FLAC
FLAC
(/flæk/; Free Lossless Audio Codec) is an audio coding format for lossless compression of digital audio, and is also the name of the free software project producing the FLAC
FLAC
tools, the reference software package that includes a codec implementation. Digital audio
Digital audio
compressed by FLAC's algorithm can typically be reduced to between 50 and 60 percent of its original size[citation needed] and decompress to an identical copy of the original audio data. FLAC
FLAC
is an open format with royalty-free licensing and a reference implementation which is free software
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MP3
MP3
MP3
(formally MPEG-1
MPEG-1
Audio Layer III or MPEG-2
MPEG-2
Audio Layer III)[4] is an audio coding format for digital audio. Originally defined as the third audio format of the MPEG-1
MPEG-1
standard, it was retained and further extended—defining additional bit rates and support for more audio channels—as the third audio format of the subsequent MPEG-2 standard
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James Plotkin
James Plotkin is an American guitarist and producer known for his role in bands such as Khanate and OLD but with an extensive catalogue outside these bands. He has played guitar for Phantomsmasher and Scorn and continues to remix tracks for bands such as KK Null, Nadja, Sunn O))), ISIS, Pelican and Earth
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Rolling Stone
Rolling Stone
Rolling Stone
is an American biweekly magazine that focuses on popular culture. It was founded in San Francisco in 1967 by Jann Wenner, who is still the magazine's publisher, and the music critic Ralph J. Gleason. It was first known for its musical coverage and for political reporting by Hunter S. Thompson
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PopMatters
PopMatters
PopMatters
is an international online magazine of cultural criticism that covers many aspects of popular culture. PopMatters
PopMatters
publishes reviews, interviews, and detailed essays on most cultural products and expressions in areas such as music,[2] television, films, books, video games, comics, sports, theater, visual arts, travel, and the Internet.[3]Contents1 History 2 Staff 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] PopMatters
PopMatters
was founded by Sarah Zupko, who had previously established the cultural studies academic resource site PopCultures.[4] PopMatters launched in the fall of 1999 as a sister site providing original essays, reviews and criticism of various media products. Over time, the site went from a weekly publication schedule to a five-day-a-week magazine format, expanding into regular reviews, features, and columns
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All About Jazz
All About Jazz
Jazz
is a web site established by Michael Ricci in 1995. A volunteer staff publishes news, album reviews, articles, videos, and listings of concerts and other events having to do with jazz. Ricci maintains a related site, Jazz
Jazz
Near You. The Jazz
Jazz
Journalists Association[2] voted All About Jazz
Jazz
the Best Website Covering Jazz
Jazz
for thirteen consecutive years between 2003 and 2015, when the category was retired. In 2015, Ricci said the site received a peak of 1.3 million readers per month in 2007.[3] Another source said that the site has over 500,000 readers around the world.[4] Ricci was born in Philadelphia. He heard classical and jazz from his father's music collection. He played trumpet and went to his first jazz concert when he was eight
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Wembley
Wembley
Wembley
(/ˈwɛmbli/) is an area of northwest London, England, and part of the London
London
Borough of Brent. It is home to the Wembley
Wembley
Arena and Wembley
Wembley
Stadium. Wembley
Wembley
formed a separate civil parish from 1894 and was incorporated as a municipal borough in 1937
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Compact Disc
Compact disc
Compact disc
(CD) is a digital optical disc data storage format that was co-developed by Philips
Philips
and Sony
Sony
and released in 1982. The format was originally developed to store and play only sound recordings but was later adapted for storage of data (CD-ROM). Several other formats were further derived from these, including write-once audio and data storage (CD-R), rewritable media (CD-RW), Video Compact Disc (VCD), Super Video Compact Disc (SVCD), Photo CD, PictureCD, CD-i, and Enhanced Music CD. The first commercially available Audio CD player, the Sony
Sony
CDP-101, was released October 1982 in Japan. Standard CDs have a diameter of 120 millimetres (4.7 in) and can hold up to about 80 minutes of uncompressed audio or about 700  MiB of data
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