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Cupid
In classical mythology, Cupid
Cupid
(Latin Cupīdō [kʊˈpiː.doː], meaning "desire") is the god of desire, erotic love, attraction and affection. He is often portrayed as the son of the love goddess Venus and the war god Mars. He is also known in Latin as Amor ("Love"). His Greek counterpart is Eros.[1] Although Eros
Eros
is generally portrayed as a slender winged youth in Classical Greek art, during the Hellenistic period, he was increasingly portrayed as a chubby boy. During this time, his iconography acquired the bow and arrow that represent his source of power: a person, or even a deity, who is shot by Cupid's arrow is filled with uncontrollable desire. In myths, Cupid
Cupid
is a minor character who serves mostly to set the plot in motion. He is a main character only in the tale of Cupid
Cupid
and Psyche, when wounded by his own weapons, he experiences the ordeal of love
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Walters Art Museum
Coordinates: 39°17′48″N 76°36′58″W / 39.29667°N 76.61611°W / 39.29667; -76.61611The Walters Art MuseumNorth Charles Street original main entranceFormer name The Walters Art GalleryEstablished 1934 (1934)Location Mount Vernon-Belvedere, Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.Type Art museumDirector Julia Marciari-Alexander (2016)[1] Public
Public
transit access  Light Rail Hunt Valley – BWI MarshallCentre Street StationWebsite Official websiteThe Walters Art Museum, located in Mount Vernon-Belvedere, Baltimore, Maryland, United States, is a public art museum founded and opened in 1934
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Greek Primordial Gods
In Greek mythology, the primordial deities are the first gods and goddesses born from the void of Chaos. In Orphic tradition, they are born from Chronos
Chronos
and Ananke. Hesiod's first (after Chaos) are Gaia, Tartarus, Eros, Erebus
Erebus
and Nyx. The primordial deities Gaia and Uranus give birth to the Titans. The Titans Cronus
Cronus
and Rhea give birth to Zeus, Poseidon, Hades, Hestia, Hera
Hera
and Demeter
Demeter
who overthrow the Titans. The warring of the gods ends with the reign of Zeus.Contents1 Hesiod's primordial genealogy1.1 Genealogical tree 1.2 Other sources2 Non-Hesiodic theogonies2.1 Homeric primordial theogony 2.2 Other Greek theogonies 2.3 Philosophical theogonies3 Interpretation of primordial deities 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHesiod's primordial genealogy[edit] Hesiod's Theogony
Theogony
(c
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Renaissance
The Renaissance
Renaissance
(UK: /rɪˈneɪsəns/, US: /rɛnəˈsɑːns/)[1] is a period in European history, covering the span between the 14th and 17th centuries. It is an extension of the Middle Ages, and is bridged by the Age of Enlightenment
Age of Enlightenment
to modern history. It grew in fragments, with the very first traces found seemingly in Italy, coming to cover much of Europe, for some scholars marking the beginning of the modern age. The intellectual basis of the Renaissance
Renaissance
was its own invented version of humanism, derived from the concept of Roman Humanitas and the rediscovery of classical Greek philosophy, such as that of Protagoras, who said that "Man is the measure of all things." This new thinking became manifest in art, architecture, politics, science and literature
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Seneca The Younger
Seneca the Younger
Seneca the Younger
(c. 4 BC – AD 65), fully Lucius Annaeus Seneca and also known simply as Seneca (/ˈsɛnɪkə/), was a Roman Stoic philosopher, statesman, dramatist, and—in one work—satirist of the Silver Age of Latin
Latin
literature. Seneca was born in Cordoba in Hispania, and raised in Rome, where he was trained in rhetoric and philosophy. He was a tutor and later advisor to emperor Nero. He was forced to take his own life for alleged complicity in the Pisonian conspiracy to assassinate Nero, in which he was likely to have been innocent.[1][2] His father was Seneca the Elder, his elder brother was Lucius Junius Gallio Annaeanus, and his nephew was the poet Lucan. His stoic and calm suicide has become the subject of numerous paintings. As a writer Seneca is known for his philosophical works, and for his plays which are all tragedies
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Red-figure Pottery
Red-figure vase painting is one of the most important styles of figural Greek vase painting. It developed in Athens
Athens
around 520 BC and remained in use until the late 3rd century BC. It replaced the previously dominant style of black-figure vase painting within a few decades. Its modern name is based on the figural depictions in red colour on a black background, in contrast to the preceding black-figure style with black figures on a red background. The most important areas of production, apart from Attica, were in Southern Italy. The style was also adopted in other parts of Greece. Etruria
Etruria
became an important centre of production outside the Greek World. Attic red-figure vases were exported throughout Greece
Greece
and beyond. For a long time, they dominated the market for fine ceramics
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Eros (other)
Eros
Eros
is the Greek god of love. Eros
Eros
may also refer to:Contents1 Astronomy 2 Comics and magazines 3 Film 4 Locations 5 Music 6 People 7 Philosophy 8 Technology 9 See alsoAstronomy[edit]<
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Baltimore
Baltimore
Baltimore
(/ˈbɔːltɪmɔːr/, locally [ˈbɔɫmɔɻ]) is the largest city in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Maryland, and the 30th-most populous city in the United States. Baltimore
Baltimore
was established by the Constitution of Maryland[9] and is an independent city that is not part of any county. With a population of 611,648 in 2017, Baltimore
Baltimore
is the largest independent city in the United States
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Conflation
Conflation
Conflation
happens when the identities of two or more individuals, concepts, or places, sharing some characteristics of one another, seem to be a single identity, and the differences appear to become lost.[1] In logic, it is the practice of treating two distinct concepts as if they were one, which produces errors or misunderstandings as a fusion of distinct subjects tends to obscure analysis of relationships which are emphasized by contrasts.[2] However, if the distinctions between the two concepts appear to be superficial, intentional conflation
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Hesiod
Hesiod
Hesiod
(/ˈhiːsiəd/ or /ˈhɛsiəd/;[1] Greek: Ἡσίοδος Hēsíodos) was a Greek poet generally thought by scholars to have been active between 750 and 650 BC, around the same time as Homer.[2][3] He is generally regarded as the first written poet in the Western tradition to regard himself as an individual persona with an active role to play in his subject.[4] Ancient authors credited Hesiod and
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Pausanias (geographer)
Pausanias (/pɔːˈseɪniəs/; Greek: Παυσανίας Pausanías; c. AD 110 – c. 180)[1] was a Greek traveler and geographer of the second century AD, who lived in the time of Roman emperors Hadrian, Antoninus Pius, and Marcus Aurelius. He is famous for his Description of Greece (Ancient Greek: Ἑλλάδος Περιήγησις, Hellados Periegesis),[2] a lengthy work that describes ancient Greece from his first-hand observations. This work provides crucial information for making links between classical literature and modern archaeology. Andrew Stewart assesses him as:A careful, pedestrian writer...interested not only in the grandiose or the exquisite but in unusual sights and obscure ritual
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Chaos (cosmogony)
Chaos (Greek χάος, khaos) refers to the formless or void state preceding the creation of the universe or cosmos in the Greek creation myths, or to the initial "gap" created by the original separation of heaven and earth.[1][2][3] In Hesiod's Theogony
Theogony
(c
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Gaia (mythology)
In Greek mythology, Gaia
Gaia
(/ˈɡeɪ.ə/ or /ˈɡaɪ.ə/ from Ancient Greek Γαῖα, a poetical form of Γῆ Gē, "land" or "earth"[1]), also spelled Gaea, is the personification of the Earth[2] and one of the Greek primordial deities. Gaia
Gaia
is the ancestral mother of all life: the primal Mother Earth
Earth
goddess. She is the immediate parent of Uranus (the sky), from whose sexual union she bore the Titans (themselves parents of many of the Olympian gods) and the Giants, and of Pontus (the sea), from whose union she bore the primordial sea gods
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Natale Conti
Natale Conti or Latin
Latin
Natalis Comes, also Natalis de Comitibus and French Noël le Comte (1520–1582) was an Italian mythographer, poet, humanist and historian. His major work Mythologiae,[1] ten books written in Latin, was first published in Venice
Venice
in 1567[2] and became a standard source for classical mythology in later Renaissance Europe. It was reprinted in numerous editions;[3] after 1583, these were appended with a treatise on the Muses
Muses
by Geoffroi Linocier
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Ares
Ares
Ares
(/ˈɛəriːz/; Ancient Greek: Ἄρης, Áres [árɛːs]) is the Greek god of war
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Latin Literature
Latin
Latin
literature includes the essays, histories, poems, plays, and other writings written in the Latin
Latin
language
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