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Culture Of Belarus
The culture of Belarus
Belarus
is the product of a millennium of development under the impact of a number of diverse factors. These include the physical environment; the ethnographic background of Belarusians
Belarusians
(the merger of Slavic newcomers with Baltic natives); the paganism of the early settlers and their hosts; Eastern Orthodox Christianity
Eastern Orthodox Christianity
as a link to the Byzantine literary and cultural traditions; the country's lack of natural borders; the flow of rivers toward both the Black Sea and the Baltic Sea; and the variety of religions in the region (Catholicism, Orthodoxy, Judaism, and Islam).[1][2] An early Western influence on Belarusian culture was Magdeburg Law—charters that granted municipal self-rule and were based on the laws of German cities
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Verasy
Verasy (Верасы) was a musical band created in Belarus (then Belarusian SSR, Soviet Union) in 1971
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Faust
Faust
Faust
is the protagonist of a classic German legend, based on the historical Johann Georg Faust
Johann Georg Faust
(c. 1480–1540). Faust
Faust
is an erudite who is highly successful yet dissatisfied with his life, which leads him to make a pact with the Devil, exchanging his soul for unlimited knowledge and worldly pleasures. The Faust
Faust
legend has been the basis for many literary, artistic, cinematic, and musical works that have reinterpreted it through the ages
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Slutsk
Slutsk
Slutsk
(officially transliterated as Sluck, Belarusian: Слуцк; Russian: Слуцк; Polish: Słuck, Lithuanian: Sluckas, Yiddish/Hebrew: סלוצק Slotsk) is a city in Belarus, located on the Sluch River 105 km (65 mi) south of Minsk. As of 2010 its population is of 61,400.[2] Slutsk
Slutsk
is the administrative center of Slutsk
Slutsk
Raion.Contents1 Geography 2 History 3 Jewish
Jewish
community 4 People 5 International relations5.1 Twin towns — brother cities6 See also 7 References 8 Gallery 9 External linksGeography[edit] The city is situated in the south-west of its Region, 26 km (16 mi) north of Soligorsk. History[edit] Slutsk
Slutsk
was first mentioned in writing in 1116. It was part of the Principality of Turov and Pinsk, but in 1160 it became the capital of a separate principality
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Minsk
Minsk
Minsk
(Belarusian: Мінск, pronounced [mʲinsk]; Russian: Минск, [mʲinsk]) is the capital and largest city of Belarus, situated on the Svislach and the Nyamiha Rivers. As the national capital, Minsk
Minsk
has a special administrative status in Belarus
Belarus
and is the administrative centre of Minsk Region
Minsk Region
(voblast) and Minsk
Minsk
raion (district). In 2013, it had a population of 2,002,600. Minsk
Minsk
is the administrative capital of the Commonwealth of Independent States
Commonwealth of Independent States
(CIS) and seat of the Executive Secretary. The earliest historical references to Minsk
Minsk
date to the 11th century (1067), when it was noted as a provincial city within the Principality of Polotsk. The settlement developed on the rivers
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Francysk Skaryna
Francysk Skaryna
Francysk Skaryna
or Francisk Skorina (pronounced [franˈt͡sɨsk skaˈrɨna]; Latin: Franciscus Scorina, Belarusian: Францыск (Францішак[1]) Скарына; Polish: Franciszek Skaryna; ca. 1490–before 29 January 1552) was a Belarusian humanist, physician, translator and one of the first book printers in Eastern Europe, laying the groundwork for the development of the Belarusian language.Contents1 Early life and education 2 Later life 3 Religion 4 Publishing activities 5 Books 6 Legacy 7 Francysk Skaryna
Francysk Skaryna
in modern art 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksEarly life and education[edit] Skaryna was born into the family of a wealthy merchant in Polatsk, then a major trade and manufacturing center of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania. His older brother, Ivan, was also a merchant. The brothers had a property, possibly ancestral, in Polatsk.[2] The exact date of Skaryna's birth is unknown
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The Bible
Outline of Bible-related topics   Bible
Bible
book    Bible
Bible
portalv t eThe Bible
Bible
(from Koine Greek
Koine Greek
τὰ βιβλία, tà biblía, "the books")[1] is a collection of sacred texts or scriptures that Jews
Jews
and Christians consider to be a product of divine inspiration and a record of the relationship between God and humans. Many different authors contributed to the Bible
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Old Belarusian
Ruthenian or Old Ruthenian (see other names) was the group of varieties of Eastern Slavonic spoken in the Grand Duchy of Lithuania and later in the East Slavic territories of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth. The written form is also called Chancery Slavonic by Lithuanian linguists.[3] Scholars do not agree whether Ruthenian was a separate language, or a Western dialect or set of dialects of Old East Slavic, but it is agreed that Ruthenian has a close genetic relationship with it. Old East Slavic was the colloquial language used in Kievan Rus' (10th–13th centuries).[4] Ruthenian is seen as a predecessor of modern Belarusian, Rusyn and Ukrainian
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Reformation
The Reformation, or, more fully, the Protestant
Protestant
Reformation, was a schism in Western Christianity
Christianity
initiated by Martin Luther
Martin Luther
and continued by John Calvin, Huldrych Zwingli, Jacobus Arminius
Jacobus Arminius
and other Protestant Reformers
Protestant Reformers
in 16th-century Europe. It is usually considered to have started with the publication of the Ninety-five Theses
Ninety-five Theses
by Martin Luther
Martin Luther
in 1517 and lasted until the end of the Thirty Years' War in 1648. Although there had been earlier attempts to reform the Catholic Church – such as those of Jan Hus, Peter Waldo, John Wycliffe, and Girolamo Savonarola – Luther is widely acknowledged to have started the Reformation
Reformation
with the Ninety-five Theses
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Counter-Reformation
The Counter- Reformation
Reformation
(Latin: Contrareformatio), also called the Catholic Reformation
Reformation
(Latin: Reformatio Catholica) or the Catholic Revival,[1] was the period of Catholic resurgence initiated in response to the Protestant Reformation, beginning with the Council of Trent (1545–1563) and ending at the close of the Thirty Years' War (1648)
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Yakub Kolas
Yakub Kolas
Yakub Kolas
(also Jakub Kołas, Belarusian: Яку́б Ко́лас, November 3 [O.S. October 22] 1882 – August 13, 1956), real name Kanstancin Mickievič (Міцке́віч Канстанці́н Міха́йлавіч) was a Belarusian writer, People's Poet of the Byelorussian SSR
Byelorussian SSR
(1926), and member (1928) and vice-president (from 1929) of the Belarusian Academy of Sciences. In his works, Yakub Kolas
Yakub Kolas
was known for his sympathy towards the ordinary Belarusian peasantry. This was evident in his pen name 'Kolas', meaning 'ear of grain' in Belarusian. He wrote collections of poems Songs of Captivity (1908) and Songs of Grief (Belarusian: Песьні-жальбы, 1910), poems A New Land (Belarusian: Новая зямля, 1923) and Simon the Musician (Belarusian: Сымон-музыка, 1925), stories, and plays
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Opera
Opera
Opera
(Italian: [ˈɔːpera]; English plural: operas; Italian plural: opere [ˈɔːpere]) is an art form in which singers and musicians perform a dramatic work combining text (libretto) and musical score, usually in a theatrical setting.[1] In traditional opera, singers do two types of singing: recitative, a speech-inflected style[2] and arias, a more melodic style, in which notes are sung in a sustained fashion. Opera
Opera
incorporates many of the elements of spoken theatre, such as acting, scenery, and costumes and sometimes includes dance
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Antoni Radziwiłł
Prince Antoni Henryk Radziwiłł
Radziwiłł
(Polish pronunciation: [radʑiˈviw]; 13 June 1775 – 7 April 1833) was a Polish and Prussian noble, aristocrat, musician and politician. Initially a hereditary Duke of Nieśwież and Ołyka, as a scion of the Radziwiłł family
Radziwiłł family
he also held the honorific title of a Reichsfürst of the Holy Roman Empire
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Brest, Belarus
Brest (Belarusian: Берасьце Bieraście, Russian: Брест Brest, Yiddish: בריסק‎ Brisk), formerly Brest-Litoŭsk (Belarusian: Брэст-Лiтоўск) (Brest-on-the-Bug Polish: Brześć nad Bugiem, and Berestia Ukrainian: Берестя), is a city (population 340,141 in 2016) in Belarus
Belarus
at the border with Poland opposite the Polish city of Terespol, where the Bug and Mukhavets rivers meet. It is the capital city of the Brest Region. The city of Brest is a historic site of many cultures. It was the location of important historical events such as the Union of Brest and Treaty of Brest-Litovsk
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Stanisław Moniuszko
Stanisław Moniuszko
Stanisław Moniuszko
(Polish pronunciation: [stãˈɲiswaf mɔ̃ˈɲuʃkɔ]; May 5, 1819, Ubiel, Minsk Governorate
Minsk Governorate
– June 4, 1872, Warsaw, Congress Poland) was a Polish composer, conductor and teacher
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Vintsent Dunin-Martsinkyevich
Vincent Dunin-Marcinkievič (Belarusian: Вінцэнт (Вінцук) Дунін-Марцінкевіч; Polish: Wincenty Dunin-Marcinkiewicz; c. 1808–1884) was a Belarusian writer,[1] poet, dramatist and social activist and is considered as one of the founders of the modern Belarusian literary tradition[2] and national school theatre.[3] Vincent Dunin-Marcinkievič was born in a Belarusian part[4] of Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth, in a noble family (szlachta of Łabędź coat of arms) in the region of Babruysk. He graduated from the medical faculty of the University of St. Petersburg. He wrote both in contemporary Belarusian and Polish languages
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