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Cubic Mile
A cubic mile (abbreviation: cu mi or mi3[1]) is an imperial and US customary (non-SI non-metric) unit of volume, used in the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom
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Acre-foot
The acre-foot is a unit of volume commonly used in the United States in reference to large-scale water resources, such as reservoirs, aqueducts, canals, sewer flow capacity, irrigation water,[1] and river flows.Contents1 Definitions 2 Application 3 See also 4 Notes 5 ReferencesDefinitions[edit] As the name suggests, an acre-foot is defined as the volume of one acre of surface area to a depth of one foot. Since an acre is defined as a chain by a furlong (i.e. 66 ft × 660 ft or 20.12 m × 201.17 m), an acre-foot is 43,560 cubic feet (1,233 m3). There are two definitions of an acre-foot (differing by about 0.0006%), depending on whether the "foot" used is an "international foot" or a "U.S. survey foot".1 acre-foot = 43,560 cubic feet = 75,271,680 cu in1 international acre-foot = 43,560 international cubic feet≈ 1,233.48183754752 m3≈ 271,328.072596 imp gal≈ 325,851 3⁄7 US gal1 U.S
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Furlong
A furlong is a measure of distance in imperial units and U.S. customary units equal to one-eighth of a mile, equivalent to 660 feet, 220 yards, 40 rods, or 10 chains. Using the international definition of the inch as exactly 25.4 millimetres, one furlong is 201.168 metres. However, the United States does not uniformly use this conversion ratio. Older ratios are in use for surveying purposes in some states, leading to variations in the length of the furlong of about two parts per million, or 0.4 millimetres (​1⁄64 inch). This variation is too small to have many practical consequences. Five furlongs are about 1.0 kilometre (1.00584 km is the exact value, according to the international conversion).Contents1 History 2 Use 3 Conversion to SI units 4 See also 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] The name furlong derives from the Old English words furh (furrow) and lang (long)
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Square Mile
The square mile (abbreviated as sq mi and sometimes as mi²)[1] is an imperial and US unit of measure for an area equal to the area of a square with a side length of one statute mile.[2] It should not be confused with miles square, which refers to a square region with each side having the specified length. For instance, 20 miles square (20 × 20 miles) has an area equal to 400 square miles; a rectangle of 10 × 40 miles likewise has an area of 400 square miles, but it is not 20 miles square. One square mile is equal to:4,014,489,600 square inches[3] 27,878,400 square feet[3] 3,097,600 square yards[3] 640 acres[1] 2560 roods[4]A square mile is equivalent to the following metric measures:25,899,881,103.36 square centimetres 2,589,988.110336 square metres 258.9988110336 hectares 2.589988110336 square kilometresWhen applied to a portion of the earth's surface, "square mile" is an informal synonym for section. Romans derived measurements from marching
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Barrel
A barrel, cask, or tun is a hollow cylindrical container, traditionally made of wooden staves bound by wooden or metal hoops. Traditionally, the barrel was a standard size of measure referring to a set capacity or weight of a given commodity. For example, in the UK a barrel of beer refers to a quantity of 36 imperial gallons (160 L; 43 US gal). Wine
Wine
was shipped in barrels of 119 litres (31 US gal; 26 imp gal). Modern wooden barrels for wine-making are either made of French common oak (Quercus robur) and white oak (Quercus petraea) or from American white oak (Quercus alba) and have typically these standard sizes: "Bordeaux type" 225 litres (59 US gal; 49 imp gal), "Burgundy type" 228 litres (60 US gal; 50 imp gal) and " Cognac
Cognac
type" 300 litres (79 US gal; 66 imp gal)
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Bushel
A bushel (abbreviation: bsh. or bu.) is an imperial and US customary unit of weight or mass based upon an earlier measure of dry capacity. The old bushel was equal to 2 kennings (obsolete), 4 pecks or 8 gallons and was used mostly for agricultural products such as wheat. In modern usage, the volume is nominal, with bushels denoting a mass defined for each commodity differently. The name "bushel" is also used to translate similar units in other measurement systems.Contents1 Name 2 History 3 Volume 4 Weight 5 Other units 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksName[edit] The name comes from the Old French
Old French
boissiel and buissiel, meaning "little box".[1] It may further derive from Old French
Old French
boise, thus meaning "little butt".[1] History[edit] The bushel is an intermediate value between the pound and ton or tun that was introduced to England following the Norman Conquest
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Gallon
The gallon (/ˈɡælən/) is a unit of measurement for liquid capacity in both the US customary units and the British imperial systems of measurement
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Cubic Equation
In algebra, a cubic function is a function of the form f ( x ) = a x 3 + b x 2 + c x + d displaystyle f(x)=ax^ 3 +bx^ 2 +cx+d in which a is nonzero. Setting f(x) = 0 produces a cubic equation of the form a x 3 + b x 2 + c x + d = 0. displaystyle ax^ 3 +bx^ 2 +cx+d=0., The solutions of this equation are called roots of the polynomial f(x). If all of the coefficients a, b, c, and d of the cubic equation are real numbers, then it has at least one real root (this is true for all odd degree polynomials). All of the roots of the cubic equation can be found algebraically
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Imperial Unit
The system of imperial units or the imperial system (also known as British Imperial[1] or Exchequer Standards of 1825) is the system of units first defined in the British Weights and Measures Act of 1824, which was later refined and reduced. The Imperial units
Imperial units
replaced the Winchester Standards, which were in effect from 1588 to 1825.[2] The system came into official use across the British Empire. By the late 20th century, most nations of the former empire had officially adopted the metric system as their main system of measurement, although some imperial units are still used in the United Kingdom, Canada
Canada
and other countries formerly part of the British Empire
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Cubic Foot
The cubic foot (symbol ft3)[1] is an imperial and US customary (non-metric) unit of volume, used in the United States, and partially in Canada, and the United Kingdom. It is defined as the volume of a cube with sides of one foot (0.3048 m) in length
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Cubic Function
In algebra, a cubic function is a function of the form f ( x ) = a x 3 + b x 2 + c x + d displaystyle f(x)=ax^ 3 +bx^ 2 +cx+d in which a is nonzero. Setting f(x) = 0 produces a cubic equation of the form a x 3 + b x 2 + c x + d = 0. displaystyle ax^ 3 +bx^ 2 +cx+d=0., The solutions of this equation are called roots of the polynomial f(x). If all of the coefficients a, b, c, and d of the cubic equation are real numbers, then it has at least one real root (this is true for all odd degree polynomials). All of the roots of the cubic equation can be found algebraically
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Length
In geometric measurements, length is the most extended dimension of an object.[1] In the International System of Quantities, length is any quantity with dimension distance. In other contexts, length is a measured dimension of an object. Length
Length
may be distinguished from height, which is vertical extent, and width or breadth, which are the distance from side to side, measuring across the object at right angles to the length. For example, it is possible to cut a length of wire shorter than the wire's width
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Cube (arithmetic)
In geometry, a cube[1] is a three-dimensional solid object bounded by six square faces, facets or sides, with three meeting at each vertex. The cube is the only regular hexahedron and is one of the five Platonic solids. It has 6 faces, 12 edges, and 8 vertices. The cube is also a square parallelepiped, an equilateral cuboid and a right rhombohedron. It is a regular square prism in three orientations, and a trigonal trapezohedron in four orientations. The cube is dual to the octahedron
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Kilometre
The kilometre (International spelling as used by the International Bureau of Weights and Measures; SI symbol: km; /ˈkɪləmiːtər/ or /kɪˈlɒmɪtər/) or kilometer (American spelling) is a unit of length in the metric system, equal to one thousand metres (kilo- being the SI prefix
SI prefix
for 7003100000000000000♠1000)
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Yard
The yard (abbreviation: yd) is an English unit of length, in both the British imperial and US customary systems of measurement, that comprises 3 feet or 36 inches. It is by international agreement in 1959 standardized as exactly 0.9144 meters. A metal yardstick originally formed the physical standard from which all other units of length were officially derived in both English systems. In the 19th and 20th centuries, increasingly powerful microscopes and scientific measurement detected variation in these prototype yards which became significant as technology improved
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Foot (length)
The foot (pl. feet; abbreviation: ft; symbol: ′, the prime symbol) is a unit of length in the imperial and US customary systems of measurement. Since 1959, both units have been defined by international agreement as equivalent to 0.3048 meters exactly. In both systems, the foot comprises 12 inches and three feet compose a yard. Historically the "foot" was a part of many local systems of units, including the Greek, Roman, Chinese, French, and English systems. It varied in length from country to country, from city to city, and sometimes from trade to trade
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