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Crystal Serenity
Crystal Serenity
Crystal Serenity
is a cruise ship owned by Crystal Cruises. Crystal Serenity was built in 2003 by STX Europe
STX Europe
in St
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Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Los Angeles
(/lɔːs ˈændʒələs/ (listen);[a] Spanish: Los Ángeles; Spanish for "The Angels"),[16] officially the City of Los Angeles
Los Angeles
and often known by its initials L.A., is the most populous city in California, the second most populous city in the United States, after New York City, and the third most populous city in North America. With an estimated population of nearly four million,[11] Los Angeles
Los Angeles
is the cultural, financial, and commercial center of Southern California. The city is known for its Mediterranean climate, ethnic diversity, Hollywood, the entertainment industry, and its sprawling metropolis
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Beechy Island
Beechey Island
Beechey Island
( Inuktitut
Inuktitut
Iluvialuit) is an island located in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago
Canadian Arctic Archipelago
of Nunavut, Canada, in Wellington Channel. It is separated from the southwest corner of Devon Island
Devon Island
by Barrow Strait.[1] Other features include Wellington Channel, Erebus Harbour,[2] and Terror Bay. The first European visit to the island was in 1819, by Captain William Edward Parry. The island was named after the artist William Beechey (1753–1839) by his son Frederick William Beechey
William Beechey
(1796–1856), who was then serving as Parry's lieutenant.[3] It is the site of several very significant events in the history of Arctic exploration
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New York City
Bronx, Kings (Brooklyn), New York (Manhattan), Queens, Richmond (Staten Island)Historic colonies New Netherland Province of New YorkSettled 1624Consolidated 1898Named for James, Duke of YorkGovernment[2] • Type Mayor–Council • Body New York City
New York City
Council • Mayor
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Ulukhaktok
Ulukhaktok
Ulukhaktok
(traditional spelling Ulukhaqtuuq[pronunciation?] and known until 1 April 2006 as Holman) is a small hamlet on the west coast of Victoria Island, in the Inuvik Region
Inuvik Region
of the Northwest Territories, Canada. Like other small traditional communities in the territories, hunting, trapping, and fishing are major sources of income, but printmaking has taken over as the primary source of income in recent years. The two principal languages in Ulukhaktok
Ulukhaktok
are the Kangiryuarmiutun dialect of Inuinnaqtun, which is politically part of the Inuvialuktun group, and English.Contents1 History 2 Demographics 3 Economy 4 Climate 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit]Communities where Inuinnaqtun
Inuinnaqtun
is spoken including UlukhaktokThe first people to settle in the area were Natkusiak and his family in 1937
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Cambridge Bay
Cambridge Bay
Cambridge Bay
(Inuinnaqtun: Iqaluktuuttiaq Inuktitut: ᐃᖃᓗᒃᑑᑦᑎᐊᖅ; 2016 population 1,766;[3] population centre 1,619[4]) is a hamlet located on Victoria Island in the Kitikmeot Region
Kitikmeot Region
of Nunavut, Canada. It is named for Prince Adolphus, Duke of Cambridge, while the traditional Inuinnaqtun
Inuinnaqtun
name for the area is Ikaluktuutiak (old orthography) or Iqaluktuttiaq (new orthography) meaning "good fishing place". The traditional language of the area is Inuinnaqtun
Inuinnaqtun
and is written using the Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
rather than the syllabics of the Inuktitut writing system
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Victoria Island (Canada)
Victoria Island (or Kitlineq)[2][3] is a large island in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago that straddles the boundary between Nunavut
Nunavut
and the Northwest Territories
Northwest Territories
of Canada. It is the eighth largest island in the world, and at 217,291 km2 (83,897 sq mi)1 in area, it is Canada's second largest island. It is nearly double the size of Newfoundland (111,390 km2 (43,008 sq mi)), and is slightly larger than the island of Great Britain
Great Britain
(209,331 km2 (80,823 sq mi))
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Franklin Strait
The Franklin Strait
Franklin Strait
is an Arctic
Arctic
waterway in Northern Canada's territory of Nunavut. It is located between southeastern Prince of Wales Island and the Boothia Peninsula.[1] Named after British explorer Sir John Franklin
John Franklin
(1786-1847), that perished in these waters on his lost expedition. References[edit]^ Merriam-Webster's Geographical Dictionary
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Bellot Strait
Bellot Strait
Strait
is a passage of water in Nunavut
Nunavut
separating Somerset Island on the north from the Boothia Peninsula
Boothia Peninsula
on the south. At its eastern end is the Murchison Promontory, the northernmost part of mainland North America. The 2 km (1.2 mi) wide 25 km long strait connects the Gulf of Boothia
Gulf of Boothia
and Prince Regent Inlet
Prince Regent Inlet
on the east with Peel Sound
Peel Sound
and Franklin Strait
Strait
on the west. The north side of the strait rises steeply to approximately 450 m (1,480 ft), and the south shore to approximately 750 m (2,460 ft). The current in the strait can run at up to 8 kn (15 km/h; 9.2 mph) and often changes its direction
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Zenith Point
Murchison Promontory
Murchison Promontory
is a peninsula in northern Canada
Canada
that is the northernmost point on mainland Canada
Canada
and on the mainland of North America;[1][2] it is also one of the Extreme points of Earth. The distance to the North Pole
North Pole
is 1,087 nautical miles (1,251 mi; 2,013 km), or 64 km (40 mi) closer than the distance from Point Barrow, Alaska
Alaska
(the northernmost point in the United States) to the Pole.Contents1 Geography 2 History 3 References 4 External linksGeography[edit] Murchison Promontory
Murchison Promontory
is situated in Nunavut
Nunavut
on the northern part of the Boothia Peninsula
Boothia Peninsula
in the northern Canadian Arctic
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Devon Island
Devon
Devon
Island (Inuit: Tatlurutit)[1] is an island in Canada
Canada
and largest uninhabited island on Earth. It is located in Baffin Bay, Qikiqtaaluk Region, Nunavut, Canada. It is one of the larger members of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, the second-largest of the Queen Elizabeth Islands, Canada's sixth largest island, and the 27th-largest island in the world. It comprises 55,247 km2 (21,331 sq mi) (slightly smaller than Croatia) of Precambrian
Precambrian
gneiss and Paleozoic siltstones and shales.[2] The highest point is the Devon Ice Cap
Devon Ice Cap
at 1,920 m (6,300 ft) which is part of the Arctic Cordillera. Devon
Devon
Island contains several small mountain ranges, such as the Treuter Mountains, Haddington Range and the Cunningham Mountains
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Nassau, Bahamas
Nassau (/ˈnæsɔː/) is the capital and commercial centre of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. The city has an estimated population of 274,400 as of 2016, or 70 percent of the entire population of the Bahamas.[3] Lynden Pindling International Airport, the major airport for the Bahamas, is located about 16 kilometres (9.9 mi) west of Nassau city centre, and has daily flights to major cities in Canada, the Caribbean, the United Kingdom and the United States. The city is located on the island of New Providence, which functions much like a business district
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Baffin Island
Baffin Island
Baffin Island
(Inuktitut: ᕿᑭᖅᑖᓗᒃ, Qikiqtaaluk IPA: [qikiqtaːluk], French: Île de Baffin ou Terre de Baffin), in the Canadian territory of Nunavut, is the largest island in Canada and the fifth-largest island in the world. Its area is 507,451 km2 (195,928 sq mi) and its population is about 13,148 (2016 census). It is located in the region of 70° N and 75° W.[3] It was named by English colonists after English explorer William Baffin.[3] Historians believe it is likely that Pre-Columbian Norse explorers from Greenland
Greenland
and Iceland
Iceland
knew of the island
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Pond Inlet
Pond Inlet
Pond Inlet
(Inuktitut: Mittimatalik, in English the place where the landing place is[6]) is a small, predominantly Inuit
Inuit
community in the Qikiqtaaluk Region
Qikiqtaaluk Region
of Nunavut, Canada, and is located in northern Baffin Island. At the 2016 census the population was 1,617, an increase of 4.4% from the 2011 census[4] Pond Inlet
Pond Inlet
was named in 1818 by explorer John Ross for John Pond, an English astronomer. The mayor is Charlie Inuarak.[1] Tununiq Sauniq Cooperative Limited, most often referred to simply as the Co-op, also operates a local hotel and other endeavours.Contents1 Economy 2 Transportation 3 Education 4 Broadband communications 5 Climate 6 Image gallery 7 See also 8 References 9 Further reading 10 External linksEconomy[edit] Its economy is largely service based with government as the largest employer
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Disko Bay
Disko Bay
Disko Bay
(Greenlandic: Qeqertarsuup tunua; Danish: Diskobugten[1]) is a bay on the western coast of Greenland. The bay constitutes a wide southeastern inlet of Baffin Bay.Contents1 Geography 2 History 3 Wildlife 4 References4.1 Literary references 4.2 Sources5 External linksGeography[edit] To the south the coastline is complicated with multiple waterways of skerries and small islands in the Aasiaat
Aasiaat
archipelago. Qasigiannguit and Ilimanaq
Ilimanaq
are the main settlements in the southeastern inlet, just south of the outflow of Ilulissat
Ilulissat
Icefjord. From the north the bay is bounded by Qeqertarsuaq, the largest island on the western coast
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International Standard Book Number
The International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique.[a][b] Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each separate edition and variation (except reprintings) of a publication. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book will each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is ten digits long if assigned before 2007, and thirteen digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-specific and varies between countries, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN identification format was devised in 1967, based upon the 9-digit Standard Book
Book
Numbering (SBN) created in 1966
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