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Cruet
A cruet (/ˈkruːɪt/), also called a caster,[1] is a small flat-bottomed vessel with a narrow neck. Cruets often have an integral lip or spout, and may also have a handle. Unlike a small carafe, a cruet has a stopper or lid. Cruets are normally made from glass, ceramic, or stainless steel.Contents1 Uses 2 History 3 Types 4 In popular culture 5 References 6 External linksUses[edit]A cruet designed to serve vinegar at the table.Cruets today typically serve a culinary function, holding liquid condiments such as olive oil and balsamic vinegar. They often have a filter built into them to act as a strainer, so that vinegar containing herbs and other solid ingredients will pour clear. Cruets also serve as decanters for lemon juice and other oils. They are also used for the serving of the wine and water in a Catholic Mass
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Catholic Church
The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with more than 1.29 billion members worldwide.[4] As one of the oldest religious institutions in the world, it has played a prominent role in the history and development of Western civilisation.[5] Headed by the Bishop of Rome, known as the Pope, the church's doctrines are summarised in the Nicene Creed
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Books Of Kings
The two Books of Kings, originally a single book, are the eleventh and twelfth books of the Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
or Old Testament
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Coronation Mass
A coronation is the act of placement or bestowal of a crown upon a monarch's head. The term generally also refers not only to the physical crowning but to the whole ceremony wherein the act of crowning occurs, along with the presentation of other items of regalia, marking the formal investiture of a monarch with regal power. Aside from the crowning, a coronation ceremony may comprise many other rituals such as the taking of special vows by the monarch, the investing and presentation of regalia to the monarch, and acts of homage by the new ruler's subjects and the performance of other ritual deeds of special significance to the particular nation. Western-style coronations have often included anointing the monarch with holy oil, or chrism as it is often called; the anointing ritual's religious significance follows examples found in the Bible
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Marriage In The Catholic Church
Marriage in the Roman Catholic Church, also called matrimony, is the "covenant by which a man and a woman establish between themselves a partnership of the whole of life and which is ordered by its nature to the good of the spouses and the procreation and education of offspring", and which "has been raised by Christ the Lord to the dignity of a sacrament between the baptised."[1] Catholic matrimonial law, based on Roman law
Roman law
regarding its focus on marriage as a free mutual agreement or contract, became the basis for the marriage law of all European countries, at least up to the Reformation.[2]Contents1 Roman
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Eastertide
Eastertide
Eastertide
(also called the Easter
Easter
Season as well as Easter
Easter
Time) or Paschaltide (also called the Paschal Season as well as Paschal Time) is a festal season in the liturgical year of Christianity
Christianity
that focuses on celebrating the Resurrection of Jesus
Resurrection of Jesus
Christ
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Psalm 43
Psalm
Psalm
43 is the 43rd psalm from the Book of Psalms.[1][2][3][4][5] As a continuation of Psalm
Psalm
42, which was written by the sons of Korah, it too is also commonly attributed to them.[6]Contents1 Uses1.1 Among Catholics 1.2 In music2 ReferencesUses[ed
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The Fall And Rise Of Reginald Perrin
The Fall and Rise of Reginald Perrin
The Fall and Rise of Reginald Perrin
is a series of novels written by David Nobbs. He also adapted them for a British sitcom starring Leonard Rossiter in the title role. It was produced from 1976 to 1979. He adapted the screenplay for the first series from the novel. Some of its subplots were considered too dark or risqué for television and were toned down or omitted. The story concerns a middle-aged middle manager, Reginald "Reggie" Perrin, who is driven to bizarre behaviour by the pointlessness of his job at Sunshine Desserts. The sitcom proved to be a subversion of others of the era, which were often based on bland middle-class suburban family life. The first novel in the series, The Death of Reginald Perrin, was published in 1975. Later editions were retitled to match the title of the television series
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Eucharist
The Eucharist
Eucharist
(/ˈjuːkərɪst/; also called Holy Communion or the Lord's Supper, among other names) is a Christian
Christian
rite that is considered a sacrament in most churches and an ordinance in others. According to the New Testament, the rite was instituted by Jesus Christ
Christ
during his Last Supper; giving his disciples bread and wine during the Passover
Passover
meal, Jesus
Jesus
commanded his followers to "do this in memory of me" while referring to the bread as "my body" and the wine as "my blood".[1][2] Through the Eucharistic celebration Christians remember both Christ's sacrifice of himself on the cross and his commission of the apostles at the Last Supper.[3] The elements of the Eucharist, bread (leavened or unleavened) and wine (or grape juice), are consecrated on an altar (or table) and consumed thereafter
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Christian
A Christian
Christian
(/ˈkrɪstʃən, -tiən/ ( listen)) is a person who follows or adheres to Christianity, an Abrahamic, monotheistic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus
Jesus
Christ
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Lead Crystal
Lead
Lead
glass, commonly called crystal, is a variety of glass in which lead replaces the calcium content of a typical potash glass.[1] Lead glass contains typically 18–40% (by weight) lead(II) oxide (PbO), while modern lead crystal, historically also known as flint glass due to the original silica source, contains a minimum of 24% PbO.[2] Lead glass is desirable[3] owing to its decorative properties. Originally discovered by Englishman George Ravenscroft
George Ravenscroft
in 1674, the technique of adding lead oxide (in quantities of between 10 and 30%) improved the appearance of the glass and made it easier to melt using sea-coal as a furnace fuel. This technique also increased the "working period" making the glass easier to manipulate. The term lead crystal is, by technicality, not an accurate term to describe lead glass, as glass, an amorphous solid, lacks a crystalline structure
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Chapter And Conventual Mass
The Order of Friars Minor
Order of Friars Minor
Conventual (OFM Conv), commonly known as the Conventual Franciscans, or Minorites, is a branch of the Catholic Order of Friars Minor, founded by Francis of Assisi
Assisi
in 1209.Contents1 Background 2 History 3 Apostolate 4 Habit 5 Saints of the Order 6 References 7 Sources 8 External linksBackground[edit]A Conventual FranciscanMain article: Franciscans The Order of Friars Minor
Order of Friars Minor
Conventual (or Conventual Franciscans), is a mendicant Catholic religious order. It is one of three separate fraternities that make up the First Order of St. Francis, that is, the friars. (The Second Order is the Poor Clares, an order of women; members of the Third Order may be men or women, secular or regular (i.e., following a rule). It is not entirely clear how the term "Conventual" arose
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Cardinal Mazarin
Cardinal Jules Raymond Mazarin, 1st Duke of Rethel, Mayenne and Nevers (French: [ʒyl mazaʁɛ̃]; 14 July 1602 – 9 March 1661), born Giulio Raimondo Mazzarino [ˈdʒuːljo raiˈmondo madːzaˈriːno] or Mazarino,[1] was an Italian cardinal, diplomat, and politician, who served as the Chief Minister to the kings of France Louis XIII
Louis XIII
and Louis XIV
Louis XIV
from 1642 until his death. Mazarin succeeded his mentor, Cardinal Richelieu
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Medieval Ages
In the history of Europe, the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
(or Medieval Period) lasted from the 5th to the 15th century. It began with the fall of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
and merged into the Renaissance
Renaissance
and the Age of Discovery. The Middle Ages
Middle Ages
is the middle period of the three traditional divisions of Western history: classical antiquity, the medieval period, and the modern period. The medieval period is itself subdivided into the Early, High, and Late Middle Ages. Population decline, counterurbanisation, invasion, and movement of peoples, which had begun in Late Antiquity, continued in the Early Middle Ages. The large-scale movements of the Migration Period, including various Germanic peoples, formed new kingdoms in what remained of the Western Roman Empire
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St. John's Archcathedral, Warsaw
St. John's Archcathedral in Warsaw
Warsaw
(Polish: Archikatedra św. Jana w Warszawie) is a Catholic church in Warsaw's Old Town. St. John's is one of three cathedrals in Warsaw, but the only one which is also an archcathedral. It is the mother church of the archdiocese of Warsaw. St. John's Archcathedral is one of Poland's national pantheons and stands immediately adjacent to Warsaw's Jesuit church. Along with the city, the church has been listed by UNESCO
UNESCO
as of cultural significance.Contents1 History 2 Interior 3 Burials 4 Gallery4.1 Historic images 4.2 Sculptures5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit]Coronation of Queen Eleonora in St
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Old French
Old French
Old French
(franceis, françois, romanz; Modern French: ancien français) was the language spoken in Northern France
France
from the 8th century to the 14th century. In the 14th century, these dialects came to be collectively known as the langue d'oïl, contrasting with the langue d'oc or Occitan language
Occitan language
in the south of France
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