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Crotchet Castle
CROTCHET CASTLE is the sixth novel by Thomas Love Peacock
Thomas Love Peacock
, first published in 1831. As in his earlier novel Headlong Hall
Headlong Hall
, Peacock assembles a group of eccentrics, each with a single monomaniacal obsession, and derives humour and social satire from their various interactions and conversations. The character who most closely approximates to the author's own voice is the Reverend Doctor Folliott, a vigorous middle-aged clergyman with a love for ancient Greek language and literature, who is greatly suspicious of the reform slogan of the " March of Intellect
March of Intellect
", as well as anything done by the "learned friend" (his nickname for Lord Brougham ). There are two romantic courtships, between Mr
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Novel
A NOVEL is any relatively long, written work of narrative fiction , normally in prose , and typically published as a book. The genre has been described as having "a continuous and comprehensive history of about two thousand years," with its origins in classical Greece and Rome , in medieval and early modern romance , and in the tradition of the novella . The latter, an Italian word for a short story to distinguish it from a novel, has been used in English since the 18th century for a work that falls somewhere in between. Ian Watt , in The Rise of the Novel, suggested in 1957 that the novel first came into being in the early 18th century. Miguel de Cervantes , author of Don Quixote
Don Quixote
, is frequently cited as the first significant European novelist of the modern era , the first part of which was published in 1605. The ROMANCE is a closely related long prose narrative
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Special
SPECIAL or SPECIALS may refer to: CONTENTS * 1 Music * 2 Film and television * 3 Other uses * 4 See also MUSIC * Special (album) , a 1992 album by Vesta Williams * "Special" (Garbage song) , 1998 * "Special" (Mew song) , 2005 * "Special" (Stephen Lynch song) , 2000 * The Specials
The Specials
, a British band * "Special", a song by Violent Femmes on The Blind Leading the Naked * "Special", a song on
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Gryll Grange
GRYLL GRANGE is the seventh and final novel of Thomas Love Peacock
Thomas Love Peacock
, published in 1861. THE NOVELThe novel first appeared in Fraser\'s Magazine in 1860, showing a remarkable instance of vigour after his retirement from the East India Company. The exuberant humour of his former works may be wanting, but the book is delightful for its stores of anecdote and erudition, and unintentionally most amusing through the author's inveterate prejudices and pugnacious hostility to every modern innovation. The book's title turns about the belief of its owner, Gregory Gryll, 'though he found it difficult to trace the pedigree, that he was lineally descended from the ancient and illustrious Gryllus, who maintained against Ulysses the superior happiness of the life of other animals to that of the life of man.' This sapient character was one of the men whom Circe had turned into pigs and resisted being changed back
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Captain Swing
"CAPTAIN SWING" was the name appended to several threatening letters during the rural English Swing Riots
Swing Riots
of 1830, when labourers rioted over the introduction of new threshing machines and the loss of their livelihoods. Captain Swing
Captain Swing
was described as a hard-working tenant farmer driven to destitution and despair by social and political change in the early nineteenth century. CONTENTS* 1 Swing Riots
Swing Riots
* 1.1 Examples of threatening \'Swing\' letters * 2 See also * 3 Cultural references * 4 Notes * 5 Further reading * 6 External links SWING RIOTSPopular protests by farm workers occurred across a wide swath of agricultural England, from Sussex
Sussex
in the south to Kent
Kent
in the east, and they had a number of structural causes
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International Standard Book Number
The INTERNATIONAL STANDARD BOOK NUMBER (ISBN) is a unique numeric commercial book identifier. An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book , a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-based and varies from country to country, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN configuration of recognition was generated in 1967 based upon the 9-digit STANDARD BOOK NUMBERING (SBN) created in 1966. The 10-digit ISBN format was developed by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and was published in 1970 as international standard ISO 2108 (the SBN code can be converted to a ten digit ISBN by prefixing it with a zero)
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Henry Brougham, 1st Baron Brougham And Vaux
HENRY PETER BROUGHAM, 1ST BARON BROUGHAM AND VAUX, PC , QC , FRS (/ˈbruːəm, ˈbruːm ənd ˈvoʊks/ ; 19 September 1778 – 7 May 1868) was a British statesman who became Lord Chancellor
Lord Chancellor
of Great Britain. As a young lawyer in Scotland
Scotland
, Brougham helped to found the Edinburgh Review in 1802 and contributed many articles to it. He went to London, and was called to the English bar in 1808. In 1810 he entered the House of Commons as a Whig . Brougham took up the fight against the slave trade and opposed restrictions on trade with continental Europe. In 1820, he won popular renown as chief attorney to Queen Caroline , and in the next decade he became a liberal leader in the House
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Melincourt (novel)
MELINCOURT is the second novel of Thomas Love Peacock
Thomas Love Peacock
, published in 1817. It is based on the "idea of an orang-outang mimicking humanity" (see James Burnett, Lord Monboddo
James Burnett, Lord Monboddo
). An orangutan called Sir Oran Haut-Ton is put forward as a candidate for election as a Member of Parliament . REFERENCES * ^ Garnett, Richard (1911). "Peacock, Thomas Love". Encyclopædia Britannica . 21 (11th ed.). pp. 21–22. Attribution * This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain : Garnett, Richard (1911). "Peacock, Thomas Love". In Chisholm, Hugh. Encyclopædia Britannica . 21 (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. pp
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The Misfortunes Of Elphin
THE MISFORTUNES OF ELPHIN is a novella by Thomas Love Peacock
Thomas Love Peacock
, his fifth long work of fiction, published in 1829. It is set in a somewhat historically fanciful Arthurian Britain which incorporates many Welsh legends, but avoids all supernatural and mystical elements. Seithenyn appears as a major character. REFERENCES * ^ " Thomas Love Peacock
Thomas Love Peacock
(1785-1866)". Encyclopædia Britannica. 21. 1911. p
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Maid Marian (novel)
MAID MARIAN is a novella by Thomas Love Peacock
Thomas Love Peacock
, his fourth long work of fiction, published in 1822. Peacock wrote all but the last three chapters of Maid Marian at Marlow in 1818. He wrote to Percy Bysshe Shelley that he did not find "this brilliant summer," of 1818, "very favourable to intellectual exertion" but before it was quite over "rivers, castles, forests, abbeys, monks, maids, kings, and banditti were all dancing before me like a masked ball." However, in 1819 Peacock was recruited to the East India Company where his official duties delayed the completion and publication of the novella until 1822. As a result of the delay, it was taken for an imitation of Ivanhoe
Ivanhoe
although its composition had, in fact, preceded Scott's novel. It was soon dramatised with great success by Planché , and was translated into French and German
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March Of Intellect
The MARCH OF INTELLECT, or the 'March of mind', was the subject of heated debate in early nineteenth-century England, one side welcoming the progress of society towards greater, and more widespread, knowledge and understanding, the other deprecating the modern mania for progress and for new-fangled ideas. The 'March' debate was seen by Mary Dorothy George as a public reflection of the changes in British society associated with industrialisation, democracy and shifting social statuses – changes welcomed by some and not by others. CONTENTS * 1 Origins and context * 2 Peak * 3 Victorian accommodation * 4 See also * 5 References * 6 External links ORIGINS AND CONTEXTThe roots of the controversy over the March of intellect can be traced back to the spread of education to two new groups in England after 1800 - children and the working-class
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Headlong Hall
HEADLONG HALL is a novella by Thomas Love Peacock
Thomas Love Peacock
, his first long work of fiction, written in 1815 and published in 1816. As in his later novel Crotchet Castle , Peacock assembles a group of eccentrics, each with a single monomaniacal obsession, and derives humor and social satire from their various interactions and conversations. The setting is the country estate of Squire Harry Headlong Ap-Rhaiader, Esq., in Wales. As part of Mr. Cranium the phrenologist's announcement of his lecture, the author coins the words osteosarchaematosplanchnochondroneuromuelous and osseocarnisanguineoviscericartilaginonervomedullary. They refer to the structure of the human body; they are adjectives compounded by stringing together classical terms that describe the body, using ancient Greek terms for the first word and Latin for the second. REFERENCES * ^ " Thomas Love Peacock
Thomas Love Peacock
(1785-1866)"
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Nightmare Abbey
NIGHTMARE ABBEY is an 1818 novella by Thomas Love Peacock , and his third long work of fiction to be published. It was written in late March and June 1818, and published in London in November of the same year by T. Hookham Jr of Old Bond Street and Baldwin, Craddock & Joy of Paternoster Row . The novella was lightly revised by the author in 1837 for republication in Volume 57 of Bentley's Standard Novels. CONTENTS * 1 Plot summary * 2 Characters * 3 Major themes * 4 Famous passages and quotations * 5 Allusions and references in Nightmare Abbey
Nightmare Abbey
* 6 Literary significance Mr Toobad, a Manichaean Millenarian ; Mr Listless, Scythrop's languid and world-weary college friend; and Mr Cypress, a misanthropic poet. The only exception is the sanguine Mr Hilary, who, as Mr Glowry's brother-in-law, is obliged to visit the abbey from family interests
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Crotchet Castle
CROTCHET CASTLE is the sixth novel by Thomas Love Peacock
Thomas Love Peacock
, first published in 1831. As in his earlier novel Headlong Hall
Headlong Hall
, Peacock assembles a group of eccentrics, each with a single monomaniacal obsession, and derives humour and social satire from their various interactions and conversations. The character who most closely approximates to the author's own voice is the Reverend Doctor Folliott, a vigorous middle-aged clergyman with a love for ancient Greek language and literature, who is greatly suspicious of the reform slogan of the " March of Intellect
March of Intellect
", as well as anything done by the "learned friend" (his nickname for Lord Brougham ). There are two romantic courtships, between Mr
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Thomas Love Peacock
THOMAS LOVE PEACOCK (18 October 1785 – 23 January 1866) was an English novelist , poet , and official of the East India Company
East India Company
. He was a close friend of Percy Bysshe Shelley and they influenced each other's work. Peacock wrote satirical novels , each with the same basic setting: characters at a table discussing and criticising the philosophical opinions of the day. CONTENTS * 1 Background and education * 2 Early occupation and travelling * 3 Friendship with Shelley * 4 East India Company
East India Company
* 5 Later life * 6 Family * 7 Works * 7.1 Novels * 7.2 Verse * 7.3 Essays * 7.4 Plays * 7.5 Unfinished tales and novels * 8 References * 9 Sources * 10 Bibliography * 10.1 Editions * 10.1.1 Correspondence * 10.2 Works of criticism * 11 External links BACKGROUND AND EDUCATION The young T.L
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