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Cross Timbers
The term Cross Timbers, also known as Ecoregion
Ecoregion
29, Central Oklahoma/ Texas
Texas
Plains, is used to describe a strip of land in the United States
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Limestone
Limestone
Limestone
is a sedimentary rock, composed mainly of skeletal fragments of marine organisms such as coral, forams and molluscs. Its major materials are the minerals calcite and aragonite, which are different crystal forms of calcium carbonate (CaCO3). About 10% of sedimentary rocks are limestones. The solubility of limestone in water and weak acid solutions leads to karst landscapes, in which water erodes the limestone over thousands to millions of years
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Suburb
A suburb is a mixed-use or residential area, existing either as part of a city or urban area or as a separate residential community within commuting distance of a city.[1] In most English-speaking countries, suburban areas are defined in contrast to central or inner-city areas, but in Australian English
Australian English
and South African English, suburb has become largely synonymous with what is called a "neighborhood" in other countries and the term extends to inner-city areas. In some areas, such as Australia, China, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, and a few U.S. states, new suburbs are routinely annexed by adjacent cities
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Insect
See text.SynonymsEctognatha EntomidaInsects or Insecta (from Latin
Latin
insectum) are by far the largest group of hexapod invertebrates within the arthropod phylum. Definitions and circumscriptions vary; usually, insects comprise a class within the Phylum
Phylum
Arthropoda. As used here, the term is synonymous with Ectognatha. Insects have a chitinous exoskeleton, a three-part body (head, thorax and abdomen), three pairs of jointed legs, compound eyes and one pair of antennae
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Land Use
Land
Land
use involves the management and modification of natural environment or wilderness into built environment such as settlements and semi-natural habitats such as arable fields, pastures, and managed woods. It also has been defined as "the total of arrangements, activities, and inputs that people undertake in a certain land cover type."[1]Contents1 Regulation1.1 United States2 Environment 3 Urban growth boundaries 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksRegulation[edit]A land use map of Europe—major non-natural land uses include arable farmland (yellow) and pasture (light green). Land
Land
Use practices vary considerably across the world
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Arable Land
Arable land
Arable land
(from Latin arabilis, "able to be plowed") is, according to one definition, land capable of being ploughed and used to grow crops.[1] In Britain, it was traditionally contrasted with pasturable land such as heaths which could be used for sheep-rearing but not farmland. A quite different kind of definition is used by various agencies concerned with agriculture. In providing statistics on arable land, the FAO
FAO
and the World
World
Bank[2] use the definition offered in the glossary accompanying FAOSTAT: " Arable land
Arable land
is the land under temporary agricultural crops (multiple-cropped areas are counted only once), temporary meadows for mowing or pasture, land under market and kitchen gardens and land temporarily fallow (less than five years). The abandoned land resulting from shifting cultivation is not included in this category
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Tallgrass Prairie
The tallgrass prairie is an ecosystem native to central North America. Natural and anthropogenic fire, as well as grazing by large mammals (primarily bison), were historically agents of periodic disturbance, which regulates tree encroachment, recycles nutrients to the soil, and catalyzes some seed dispersal and germination processes
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Old-growth Forest
An old-growth forest — also termed primary forest, virgin forest, primeval forest, late seral forest, or (in Great Britain) ancient woodland — is a forest that has attained great age without significant disturbance and thereby exhibits unique ecological features and might be classified as a climax community.[1] Old-growth features include diverse tree-related structures that provide diverse wildlife habitat that increases the biodiversity of the forested ecosystem. The concept of diverse tree structure includes multi-layered canopies and canopy gaps, greatly varying tree heights and diameters, and diverse tree species and classes and sizes of woody debris. Old-growth forests are valuable for economic reasons and for the ecosystem services they provide
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United States Environmental Protection Agency
The United States
United States
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA or sometimes U.S. EPA) is an agency of the federal government of the United States which was created for the purpose of protecting human health and the environment by writing and enforcing regulations based on laws passed by Congress.[2] President Richard Nixon
Richard Nixon
proposed the establishment of EPA and it began operation on December 2, 1970, after Nixon signed an executive order. The order establishing the EPA was ratified by committee hearings in the House and Senate. The agency is led by its Administrator, who is appointed by the President and approved by Congress. The current Administrator is Scott Pruitt
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Tulsa Metropolitan Area
Lowest point: 560 feet[2][3]Density 152.5/sq. mi. (58.88/km²)Area 6,269.3 sq. mi. (16,237.4 km²)[4]Tulsa-Muskogee- Bartlesville
Bartlesville
Combined Statistical Area[1]Population 1,151,172 in 2015Cities Bartlesville, Tahlequah, and MuskogeeCounties Washington, Muskogee, and Cherokee.The Tulsa Metropolitan Area, officially defined as the Tulsa-Broken Arrow- Owasso
Owasso
Metropolitan Statistical Area
Metropolitan Statistical Area
is a metropolitan area in northeastern Oklahoma
Oklahoma
centered around the city of Tulsa and encompassing Tulsa, Rogers, Wagoner, Osage, Creek, Okmulgee and Pawnee counties
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Fire Suppression
Wildfire
Wildfire
suppression is a range of firefighting tactics used to suppress wildfires. Firefighting
Firefighting
efforts in wild land areas require different techniques, equipment, and training from the more familiar structure fire fighting found in populated areas. Working in conjunction with specially designed aerial firefighting aircraft, these wildfire-trained crews suppress flames, construct firelines, and extinguish flames and areas of heat to protect resources and natural wilderness
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Juniperus Virginiana
Juniperus
Juniperus
virginiana — its common names include red cedar, eastern redcedar,[2][3] Virginian juniper,[4] eastern juniper, red juniper, pencil cedar, and aromatic cedar — is a species of juniper native to eastern North America from southeastern Canada to the Gulf of Mexico and east of the Great Plains.[3] Further west it is replaced by the related Juniperus scopulorum
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Interstate 35
Interstate 35
Interstate 35
(I-35) is a major Interstate Highway
Interstate Highway
in the central United States. As with most interstates that end in a five, it is a major cross-country, north-south route stretching from Laredo, Texas, at the Mexican-American border
Mexican-American border
to Duluth, Minnesota, at Minnesota Highway 61 (London Road) and 26th Avenue East.[3] The highway splits into Interstate 35E—at Dallas
Dallas
and at Saint Paul, Minnesota—and Interstate 35W—at Fort Worth, Texas, and at Minneapolis. At 1,568 mi (2,523 km), Interstate 35
Interstate 35
is the ninth-longest Interstate Highway
Interstate Highway
following Interstate 94, and it is the third-longest north-south Interstate Highway, following Interstate 75 and Interstate 95
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Interstate 35W (Texas)
Interstate 35W (abbreviated I-35W), an Interstate Highway, is the western half of Interstate 35 where it splits to serve the Dallas/Fort Worth metropolitan area. I-35 splits into two branch routes, I-35W and I-35E at Hillsboro. I-35W runs north for 85.20 miles (137.12 km), carrying its own separate sequence of exit numbers. It runs through Fort Worth before rejoining with I-35E to reform I-35 in Denton. It is the more direct route for long-distance expressway traffic, as is noted on signs on I-35 leading into the I-35W/I-35E splits. Historically, other interstates were given directional suffixes. On every other interstate, the directional suffixes were phased out by giving the route a loop or spur designation. In the case of I-35, since both branches return to a unified interstate beyond the cities of Dallas and Fort Worth, the AASHTO committees allowed the suffixes to remain
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Interstate 40
Interstate 40
Interstate 40
(I-40) is a major east-west Interstate Highway
Interstate Highway
running through the south-central portion of the United States generally north of Interstate 10
Interstate 10
and Interstate 20
Interstate 20
but south of Interstate 70. The western end is at Interstate 15
Interstate 15
in Barstow, California; its eastern end is at a concurrency of U.S. Route 117
U.S. Route 117
and North Carolina
North Carolina
Highway 132 in Wilmington, North Carolina. It is the third longest interstate in the United States, behind Interstate 80
Interstate 80
and Interstate 90. Much of the western part of I-40, from Oklahoma City
Oklahoma City
to Barstow, parallels or overlays the historic U.S
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U.S. Highways
The United States Numbered Highway
Highway
System (often called U.S. Routes or U.S. Highways) is an integrated network of roads and highways numbered within a nationwide grid in the contiguous United States. As the designation and numbering of these highways were coordinated among the states, they are sometimes called Federal Highways, but the roadways were built and have always been maintained by state or local governments since their initial designation in 1926. The route numbers and locations are coordinated by the American Association of State Highway
Highway
and Transportation Officials (AASHTO).[4] The only federal involvement in AASHTO is a nonvoting seat for the United States Department of Transportation. Generally, north-to-south highways are odd-numbered, with lowest numbers in the east, the area of the founding thirteen states of the United States, and highest in the west
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