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Cross Laminated Timber
Cross-laminated timber
Cross-laminated timber
(CLT) is a wood panel product made from glueing layers of solid-sawn lumber together. Each layer of boards is orientated perpendicular to adjacent layers and glued on the wide faces of each board, usually in a symmetric way so that the outer layers have the same orientation. An odd number of layers is most common, but there are configurations with even numbers as well (which are then arranged to give a symmetric configuration). Regular timber is an anisotropic material, meaning that the physical properties change depending on the direction at which the force is applied. By gluing layers of wood at perpendicular angles, the panel is able to achieve better structural rigidity in both directions
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Plywood
Plywood
Plywood
is a sheet material manufactured from thin layers or "plies" of wood veneer that are glued together with adjacent layers having their wood grain rotated up to 90 degrees to one another. It is an engineered wood from the family of manufactured boards which includes medium-density fibreboard (MDF) and particle board (chipboard). All plywoods bind resin and wood fibre sheets (cellulose cells are long, strong and thin) to form a composite material. This alternation of the grain is called cross-graining and has several important benefits: it reduces the tendency of wood to split when nailed in at the edges; it reduces expansion and shrinkage, providing improved dimensional stability; and it makes the strength of the panel consistent across all directions. There is usually an odd number of plies, so that the sheet is balanced—this reduces warping
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Portland, Oregon
Portland (/ˈpɔːrtlənd/) is the largest city in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Oregon
Oregon
and the seat of Multnomah County. It is a major port in the Willamette Valley
Willamette Valley
region of the Pacific Northwest, at the confluence of the Willamette and Columbia rivers. The city covers 145 square miles (380 square kilometers) and had an estimated population of 639,863 in 2016,[9] making it the 26th most populous city in the United States, and the second-most populous in the Pacific Northwest.[10] Approximately 2,424,955 people live in the Portland metropolitan statistical area (MSA), making it the 25th most populous MSA in the United States. Its Combined Statistical Area
Combined Statistical Area
(CSA) ranks 18th with a population of 3,160,488
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American Institute Of Architects
The American Institute of Architects
American Institute of Architects
(AIA) is a professional organization for architects in the United States. Headquartered in Washington, D.C., the AIA offers education, government advocacy, community redevelopment, and public outreach to support the architecture profession and improve its public image
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Lumber
Lumber
Lumber
(American English; used only in North America) or timber (used in the rest of the English speaking world) is a type of wood that has been processed into beams and planks, a stage in the process of wood production. Lumber
Lumber
is mainly used for structural purposes but has many other uses as well. There are two main types of lumber. It may be supplied either rough-sawn, or surfaced on one or more of its faces. Besides pulpwood, rough lumber is the raw material for furniture-making and other items requiring additional cutting and shaping
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Green Building
Green building
Green building
(also known as green construction or sustainable building) refers to both a structure and the application of processes that are environmentally responsible and resource-efficient throughout a building's life-cycle: from planning to design, construction, operation, maintenance, renovation, and demolition.[1] This requires close cooperation of the contractor, the architects, the engineers, and the client at all project stages.[2] The Green Building practice expands and complements the classical building design concerns of economy, utility, durability, and comfort.[3] Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design
Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design
(LEED) is a set of rating systems for the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of green buildings which was Developed by the U.S. Green Building Council
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Box Girder
A box or tubular girder is a girder that forms an enclosed tube with multiple walls, rather than an I or H-beam. Originally constructed of riveted wrought iron, they are now found in rolled or welded steel, aluminium extrusions or prestressed concrete. Compared to an I-beam, the advantage of a box girder is that it better resists torsion. Having multiple vertical webs, it can also carry more load than an I-beam
I-beam
of equal height (although it will use more material than a taller I-beam
I-beam
of equivalent capacity). The distinction in naming between a box girder and a tubular girder is imprecise. Generally the term box girder is used, especially if it is rectangular in section
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Stantec
Stantec
Stantec
Inc. is an international professional services company in the design and consulting industry. Founded in 1954, as D. R. Stanley Associates in Edmonton, Alberta. Stantec
Stantec
provides professional consulting services in planning, engineering, architecture, interior design, landscape architecture, surveying, environmental sciences, project management, and project economics for infrastructure and facilities projects. The Company
Company
provides services on projects around the world through over 22,000 employees operating out of more than 400 locations in North America and 7 locations internationally.[6]Contents1 History1.1 Growth 1.2 Acquisitions2 Major projects 3 Headquarters 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] Dr
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Brownfield Land
Brownfield land
Brownfield land
is an Anglo-American term used in urban planning to describe, in Western Europe, any previously developed land that is not currently in use, whether contaminated or not or, in North America, more specifically to describe land previously used for industrial or commercial purposes with known or suspected pollution including soil contamination due to hazardous waste.[1][2]Contents1 Definition1.1 Canada 1.2 United States 1.3 United Kingdom2 Locations and contaminants 3 Brownfield status by country3.1 United States 3.2 Canada 3.3 Denmark 3.4 Fr
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High-rise Building
A high-rise building is a tall building, as opposed to a low-rise building and is defined by its height differently in various jurisdictions. It is used as a residential, office building or other functions including hotel, retail or with multiple purposes combined. A residential high-rise building is also called tower block and may be referred to as an "MDU", standing for "Multi Dwelling Unit".[1] A very tall high-rise building is referred to as a skyscraper. High-rise buildings became possible with the invention of the elevator (lift) and cheaper, more abundant building materials. The materials used for the structural system of high-rise buildings are reinforced concrete and steel
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London Design Festival
The London
London
Design Festival (LDF) is a citywide design event that takes place over nine days every September. Conceived by Sir John Sorrell and Ben Evans in 2003, the concept was to create an annual event to promote the city’s creativity, drawing in the country's thinkers, practitioners, retailers and educators to a deliver a diverse celebration of design.Contents1 About 2 Location 3 London
London
Design Festival Landmark Projects and Commissioning Programme 4 Awards 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksAbout[edit] The Festival programme is made up of over 400 events and exhibitions staged by over 300 partner organisations across the design spectrum and from around the world
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Chelsea College Of Arts
Chelsea College of Arts
Chelsea College of Arts
is a constituent college of the University of the Arts London based in London, UK, and is a leading British art and design institution with an international reputation.[1] It offers further and higher education courses in fine art, graphic design, interior design, spatial design and textile design up to PhD level.Contents1 History1.1 Polytechnic 1.2 Chelsea School of Art 1.3 London Institute2 Exhibition 3 Research 4 Affiliations 5 Other5.1 CLIP CETL6 Notable alumni 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] Polytechnic[edit] Chelsea College of Arts
Chelsea College of Arts
was originally an integral school of the South-Western Polytechnic, which opened at Manresa Road, Chelsea, in 1895 to provide scientific and technical education to Londoners. Day and evening classes for men and women were held in domestic economy, mathematics, engineering, natural science, art and music
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Stud Wall
Framing, in construction, is the fitting together of pieces to give a structure support and shape.[1] Framing materials are usually wood, engineered wood, or structural steel. The alternative to framed construction is generally called mass wall construction, where horizontal layers of stacked materials such as log building, masonry, rammed earth, adobe, etc. are used without framing.[citation needed] Building framing is divided into two broad categories,[2] heavy-frame construction (heavy framing) if the vertical supports are few and heavy such as in timber framing, pole building framing, or steel framing; or light-frame construction (light-framing) if the supports are more numerous and smaller called light-frame construction, for example balloon, platform and light-steel framing
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Finger Joint
A finger joint, also known as a comb or box joint, is a woodworking joint made by cutting a set of complementary rectangular cuts in two pieces of wood, which are then glued, with filler. To visualize a finger joint simply interlock the fingers of your hands at a ninety degree angle; hence the name "finger joint." It is stronger than a butt joint or lap joint, and often contributes to the aesthetics (appearance) of the piece. Alternate names include box-pin joint or box joint. Applications[edit] A tapered or scarfed finger joint is the most common joint used to form long pieces of lumber from solid boards; the result is finger-jointed lumber. The finger joint can also be invaluable when fixing tables and chairs and also can be used in such things as floor boards, timber roof and door construction. This is also used in design technology for students
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