HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Creon
Creon (/ˈkriːɒn/; Greek: Κρέων, Kreōn) is a figure in Greek mythology best known as the ruler of Thebes in the legend of Oedipus. He had four sons and three daughters with his wife, Eurydice (sometimes known as Henioche): Henioche, Pyrrha, Megareus (also called Menoeceus), Lycomedes and Haimon. Creon and his sister, Jocasta, were descendants of Cadmus
Cadmus
and of the Spartoi
[...More...]

"Creon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sphinx
A sphinx (Ancient Greek: Σφίγξ [spʰíŋks], Boeotian: Φίξ [pʰíːks], plural sphinxes or sphinges) is a mythical creature with the head of a human and the body of a lion. In Greek tradition, it has the head of a human, the haunches of a lion, and sometimes the wings of a bird. It is mythicised as treacherous and merciless. Those who cannot answer its riddle suffer a fate typical in such mythological stories, as they are killed and eaten by this ravenous monster.[1] This deadly version of a sphinx appears in the myth and drama of Oedipus.[2] Unlike the Greek sphinx, which was a woman, the Egyptian sphinx is typically shown as a man (an androsphinx). In addition, the Egyptian sphinx was viewed as benevolent, but having a ferocious strength similar to the malevolent Greek version and both were thought of as guardians often flanking the entrances to temples.[3] In European decorative art, the sphinx enjoyed a major revival during the Renaissance
[...More...]

"Sphinx" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Moira Buffini
Moira Buffini (born 29 May 1965)[1] is an English dramatist, director, and actor.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Plays 4 Filmography 5 References 6 External linksEarly life[edit] Buffini was born in Cheshire
Cheshire
to Irish parents, and attended Northwich County Grammar School for Girls (became The County High School, Leftwich)
[...More...]

"Moira Buffini" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Geoffrey Chaucer
Geoffrey Chaucer
Geoffrey Chaucer
(/ˈtʃɔːsər/; c. 1343 – 25 October 1400), known as the Father of English literature,[1] is widely considered the greatest English poet of the Middle Ages. He was the first poet to be buried in Poets' Corner
Poets' Corner
of Westminster Abbey. While he achieved fame during his lifetime as an author, philosopher, and astronomer, composing a scientific treatise on the astrolabe for his ten-year-old son Lewis, Chaucer also maintained an active career in the civil service as a bureaucrat, courtier and diplomat. Among his many works are The Book of the Duchess, The House of Fame, The Legend of Good Women and Troilus
Troilus
and Criseyde
[...More...]

"Geoffrey Chaucer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Lycus (descendant Of Lycus)
Lycus (Lykos) may refer to:Contents1 Mythology 2 Rivers 3 Fictional characters 4 Other uses 5 See alsoMythology[edit] Lycus (mythology), the name of numerous people in Greek mythology, including Lycus (brother of Nycteus), a ruler of the ancient city of Ancient Thebes Lycus (descendant of Lycus), son of Lycus
[...More...]

"Lycus (descendant Of Lycus)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Choragos
In the theatre of ancient Greece, the chorêgos (pl. chorêgoi; Greek: χορηγός, Greek etymology: χορός "chorus" + ἡγεῖσθαι "to lead")[n 1] was a wealthy Athenian citizen who assumed the public duty, or choregiai, of financing the preparation for the chorus and other aspects of dramatic production that were not paid for by the government of the polis or city-state.[3] Modern Anglicized forms of the word include choragus and choregus, with the accepted plurals being the Latin forms choregi and choragi.[2] In modern Greek the word χορηγός is synonymous with the word "grantor".[4] Choregoi were appointed by the archon and the tribes of Athenian citizens from among the Athenian citizens of great wealth. Service as a choregos, though an honor, was a duty for wealthy citizens and was part of the liturgical system designed to improve the city-state's economic stability through the use of private wealth to fund public good
[...More...]

"Choragos" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Delphi
Delphi
Delphi
(/ˈdɛlfaɪ/ or /ˈdɛlfi/; Greek: Δελφοί [ðelˈfi])[1] is famous as the ancient sanctuary that grew rich as the seat of Pythia, the oracle consulted about important decisions throughout the ancient classical world. Moreover, the Greeks considered Delphi
Delphi
the navel (or centre) of the world, as represented by the stone monument known as the Omphalos
Omphalos
of Delphi. It occupies an impressive site on the south-western slope of Mount Parnassus, overlooking the coastal plain to the south and the valley of Phocis. It is now an extensive archaeological site with a modern town of the same name nearby
[...More...]

"Delphi" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Phoenician Women
Phoenician may refer to:Phoenicia, an ancient civilization Phoenician alphabet Phoenician language List of Phoenician citiesSee also[edit]Phoenix (mythology) Phoenicia
[...More...]

"Phoenician Women" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Electryon
In Greek mythology, Electryon (/ɪˈlɛktriən/, Ancient Greek: Ἠλεκτρύων) was a king of Tiryns
Tiryns
and Mycenae
Mycenae
or Medea in Argolis.[1]Contents1 Family 2 Mythology 3 References 4 SourcesFamily[edit] Electryon was the son of Perseus
Perseus
and Andromeda and thus brother of Perses, Alcaeus, Heleus, Mestor, Sthenelus, Cynurus, Gorgophone and Autochthe. He married either Anaxo, daughter of his brother Alcaeus and sister of Amphitryon,[2] or Eurydice daughter of Pelops. His wife bore him a daughter Alcmena and many sons: Stratobates, Gorgophonus, Phylonomus, Celaeneus, Amphimachus, Lysinomus, Chirimachus, Anactor, and Archelaus
[...More...]

"Electryon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Spartoi
In Greek mythology, Spartoi (also Sparti) (Greek: Σπαρτοί, literal translation: "sown [men]", from σπείρω, speírō, "to sow") are a mythical people who sprang up from the dragon's teeth sown by Cadmus
Cadmus
and were believed[by whom?] to be the ancestors of the Theban nobility.Contents1 Spartoi in mythology1.1 Thebes 1.2 Colchis2 See also 3 Notes 4 Sources Spartoi in mythology[edit] Thebes[edit] Cadmus
Cadmus
arrived in Thebes, Greece, after following a cow at the urging of the oracle at Delphi, who instructed him to found a city wherever the cow should stop.[1] Cadmus, wishing to sacrifice the cow, sent his men to a nearby spring to fetch water. The spring was guarded by a dragon, which slew many of the men before Cadmus
Cadmus
killed it with his sword. According to the Bibliotheca, the dragon was sacred to Ares
[...More...]

"Spartoi" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Antimachus
Antimachus
Antimachus
of Colophon (Greek: Ἀντίμαχος ὁ Κολοφώνιος), or of Claros, was a Greek poet and grammarian, who flourished about 400 BC.[1] Scarcely anything is known of his life. The Suda claims that he was a pupil of the poets Panyassis
Panyassis
and Stesimbrotus.[2] His poetical efforts were not generally appreciated, although he received encouragement from his younger contemporary Plato
Plato
(Plutarch, Lysander, 18).[1] His chief works were: an epic Thebais, an account of the expedition of the Seven against Thebes and the war of the Epigoni; and an elegiac poem Lyde, so called from the poet's mistress, for whose death he endeavoured to find consolation telling stories from mythology of heroic disasters (Plutarch, Consul, ad Apoll
[...More...]

"Antimachus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Theseus
Theseus
Theseus
(UK: /ˈθiːsjuːs/, US: /ˈθiːsiəs/; Ancient Greek: Θησεύς [tʰɛːsěu̯s]) was the mythical king and founder-hero of Athens. Like Perseus, Cadmus, or Heracles, Theseus
Theseus
battled and overcame foes that were identified with an archaic religious and social order: “This was a major cultural transition, like the making of the new Olympia by Hercules” (Ruck & Staples, p. 204).[1] Theseus
Theseus
was a founding hero for the Athenians in the same way that Heracles
Heracles
was the founding hero for the Dorians. The Athenians regarded Theseus
Theseus
as a great reformer; his name comes from the same root as θεσμός (thesmos), Greek for "The Gathering"
[...More...]

"Theseus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Greek Mythology
Greek mythology
Greek mythology
is the body of myths and teachings that belong to the ancient Greeks, concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world, and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. It was a part of the religion in ancient Greece. Modern scholars refer to and study the myths in an attempt to shed light on the religious and political institutions of ancient Greece and its civilization, and to gain understanding of the nature of myth-making itself.[1] Greek mythology
Greek mythology
has had an extensive influence on the culture, arts, and literature of Western civilization and remains part of Western heritage and language
[...More...]

"Greek Mythology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Euripides
Euripides
Euripides
(/jʊəˈrɪpɪdiːz/ or /jɔːˈrɪpɪdiːz/;[1] Greek: Εὐριπίδης; Ancient Greek: [eu̯.riː.pí.dɛːs]) (c. 480 – c. 406 BC) was a tragedian of classical Athens. Along with Aeschylus
Aeschylus
and Sophocles, he is one of the three ancient Greek tragedians for whom a significant number of plays have survived. Some ancient scholars attributed 95 plays to him but, according to the Suda, it was 92 at most. Of these, 18 or 19 have survived more or less complete (there has been debate about his authorship of Rhesus, largely on stylistic grounds)[2] and there are also fragments, some substantial, of most of the other plays
[...More...]

"Euripides" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Greek Language
Greek (Modern Greek: ελληνικά [eliniˈka], elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα [eliniˈci ˈɣlosa] ( listen), ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece
Greece
and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean
[...More...]

"Greek Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Theban Cycle
The Theban Cycle
Theban Cycle
(Greek: Θηβαϊκὸς Κύκλος) is a collection of four lost epics of ancient Greek literature
Greek literature
which related the mythical history of the Boeotian city of Thebes.[1] They were composed in dactylic hexameter verse and were probably written down between 750 and 500 BC. The 9th-century AD scholar and clergyman Photius, in his Bibliotheca, considered the Theban Cycle
Theban Cycle
part of the Epic Cycle; however, modern scholars normally do not. The stories in the Theban Cycle
Theban Cycle
were traditional ones: the two Homeric epics, the Iliad
Iliad
and Odyssey, display knowledge of many of them
[...More...]

"Theban Cycle" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.