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Creon
CREON (/ˈkriːɒn/ ; Greek : Κρέων, Kreōn) is a figure in Greek mythology
Greek mythology
best known as the ruler of Thebes in the legend of Oedipus . He had four sons and three daughters with his wife, Eurydice (sometimes known as Henioche ): Henioche , Pyrrha, Megareus (also called Menoeceus), Lycomedes and Haimon . Creon and his sister, Jocasta
Jocasta
, were descendants of Cadmus
Cadmus
and of the Spartoi . He is sometimes considered to be the same person who purified Amphitryon of the murder of his uncle Electryon and father of Megara , first wife of Heracles
Heracles

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Spartoi
In Greek mythology
Greek mythology
, SPARTOI (also SPARTI) (Greek : Σπαρτοί, literal translation: "sown ", from σπείρω, speírō, "to sow") are a mythical people who sprang up from the dragon's teeth sown by Cadmus
Cadmus
and were believed to be the ancestors of the Theban nobility. CONTENTS* 1 Spartoi in mythology * 1.1 Thebes * 1.2 Colchis * 2 In popular culture * 3 See also * 4 Notes * 5 Sources SPARTOI IN MYTHOLOGYTHEBES Cadmus
Cadmus
arrived in Thebes, Greece
Thebes, Greece
, after following a cow at the urging of the oracle at Delphi
Delphi
, who instructed him to found a city wherever the cow should stop. Cadmus, wishing to sacrifice the cow, sent his men to a nearby spring to fetch water
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Choragos
In the theatre of ancient Greece , the CHORêGOS (pl. chorêgoi; Greek : χορηγός, Greek etymology : χορός "chorus" + ἡγεῖσθαι "to lead") was a wealthy Athenian citizen who assumed the public duty, or choregiai, of financing the preparation for the chorus and other aspects of dramatic production that were not paid for by the government of the polis or city-state . Modern Anglicized forms of the word include CHORAGUS and CHOREGUS, with the accepted plurals being the Latin forms choregi and choragi. In modern Greek the word χορηγός is synonymous with the word "grantor". Choregoi were appointed by the archon and the tribes of Athenian citizens from among the Athenian citizens of great wealth. Service as a choregos, though an honor, was a duty for wealthy citizens and was part of the liturgical system designed to improve the city-state's economic stability through the use of private wealth to fund public good
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Electryon
In Greek mythology
Greek mythology
, ELECTRYON ( /ᵻˈlɛktriən/ , Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
: Ἠλεκτρύωνα) was a king of Tiryns
Tiryns
and Mycenae
Mycenae
or Medea in Argolis . CONTENTS * 1 Family * 2 Mythology * 3 References * 4 Sources FAMILY Electryon was the son of Perseus
Perseus
and Andromeda and thus brother of Perses , Alcaeus , Heleus , Mestor , Sthenelus , Cynurus , Gorgophone and Autochthe . He married either Anaxo , daughter of his brother Alcaeus and sister of Amphitryon , or Eurydice daughter of Pelops
Pelops
. His wife bore him a daughter Alcmena and many sons: Stratobates , Gorgophonus , Phylonomus , Celaeneus , Amphimachus , Lysinomus , Chirimachus , Anactor , and Archelaus
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Theseus
THESEUS (/ˈθiːsiːəs/ ; Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
: Θησεύς ) was the mythical king and founder-hero of Athens
Athens
. Like Perseus
Perseus
, Cadmus
Cadmus
, or Heracles
Heracles
, Theseus
Theseus
battled and overcame foes that were identified with an archaic religious and social order: “This was a major cultural transition, like the making of the new Olympia by Hercules” (Ruck his name comes from the same root as θεσμός (thesmos), Greek for “The Gathering”. The myths surrounding Theseus
Theseus
– his journeys, exploits, and family – have provided material for fiction throughout the ages
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Sphinx
A SPHINX ( Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
: Σφίγξ , Boeotian : Φίξ , plural SPHINGES) is a mythical creature with the head of a human and the body of a lion . In Greek tradition , it has the head of a human , the haunches of a lion , and sometimes the wings of a bird . It is mythicised as treacherous and merciless. Those who cannot answer its riddle suffer a fate typical in such mythological stories, as they are killed and eaten by this ravenous monster. This deadly version of a sphinx appears in the myth and drama of Oedipus . Unlike the Greek sphinx, which was a woman, the Egyptian sphinx is typically shown as a man (an ANDROSPHINX). In addition, the Egyptian sphinx was viewed as benevolent, but having a ferocious strength similar to the malevolent Greek version and both were thought of as guardians often flanking the entrances to temples
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Delphi
DELPHI (/ˈdɛlfaɪ/ or /ˈdɛlfi/ ; Greek : Δελφοί, ) is famous as the ancient sanctuary that grew rich as the seat of Pythia , the oracle consulted about important decisions throughout the ancient classical world. Moreover, the Greeks considered Delphi
Delphi
the navel (or centre) of the world, as represented by the stone monument known as the Omphalos of Delphi
Delphi
. It occupies an impressive site on the south-western slope of Mount Parnassus , overlooking the coastal plain to the south and the valley of Phocis . It is now an extensive archaeological site with a modern town nearby
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Antimachus
ANTIMACHUS OF COLOPHON (Greek : Ἀντίμαχος ὁ Κολοφώνιος), or of Claros
Claros
, was a Greek poet and grammarian , who flourished about 400 BC. Scarcely anything is known of his life. The Suda claims that he was a pupil of the poets Panyassis and Stesimbrotus . His poetical efforts were not generally appreciated, although he received encouragement from his younger contemporary Plato
Plato
( Plutarch
Plutarch
, Lysander, 18). His chief works were: an epic Thebais, an account of the expedition of the Seven against Thebes and the war of the Epigoni ; and an elegiac poem Lyde, so called from the poet's mistress, for whose death he endeavoured to find consolation telling stories from mythology of heroic disasters (Plutarch, Consul, ad Apoll. 9; Athenaeus
Athenaeus
xiii
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Geoffrey Chaucer
GEOFFREY CHAUCER (/ˈtʃɔːsər/ ; c. 1343 – 25 October 1400), known as the Father of English literature , is widely considered the greatest English poet of the Middle Ages . He was the first poet to be buried in Poets\' Corner of Westminster Abbey
Westminster Abbey
. While he achieved fame during his lifetime as an author, philosopher, and astronomer , composing a scientific treatise on the astrolabe for his ten-year-old son Lewis, Chaucer also maintained an active career in the civil service as a bureaucrat, courtier and diplomat. Among his many works are The Book of the Duchess , The House of Fame , The Legend of Good Women and Troilus and Criseyde . He is best known today for The Canterbury Tales
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Presidency Of George W. Bush
43RD PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES * Presidency * Timeline -------------------------POLICIES * Domestic * Economic * Foreign * Bush Doctrine * International trips * Legislation font-size:115%;text-align:center;"> * v * t * e The PRESIDENCY OF GEORGE W. BUSH began at noon EST on January 20, 2001, when George W. Bush
George W. Bush
was inaugurated as 43rd President of the United States , and ended on January 20, 2009. Bush, a Republican , took office following a very close win in the 2000 presidential election over Democratic nominee Al Gore
Al Gore
. Bush, the 43rd president, is the eldest son of the 41st president, George H. W. Bush
George H. W. Bush
. Bush was re-elected in 2004 , defeating his Democratic opponent John Kerry
John Kerry

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Euripides
EURIPIDES (/juːˈrɪpᵻdiːz/ or /jɔːˈrɪpᵻdiːz/ ; Greek : Εὐριπίδης; Ancient Greek: ) (c. 480 – c. 406 BC) was a tragedian of classical Athens . Along with Aeschylus and Sophocles , he is one of the three ancient Greek tragedians a number of whose plays have survived. Some ancient scholars attributed 95 plays to him but according to the Suda
Suda
it was 92 at most. Of these, 18 or 19 have survived more or less complete (there has been debate about his authorship of Rhesus , largely on stylistic grounds) and there are also fragments, some substantial, of most of the other plays
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Greek Language
GREEK ( Modern Greek : ελληνικά , elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα ( listen ), ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece
Greece
and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean . It has the longest documented history of any living Indo-European language, spanning 34 centuries of written records. Its writing system has been the Greek alphabet for the major part of its history; other systems, such as Linear B and the Cypriot syllabary , were used previously. The alphabet arose from the Phoenician script and was in turn the basis of the Latin
Latin
, Cyrillic
Cyrillic
, Armenian , Coptic , Gothic and many other writing systems
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Greek Mythology
GREEK MYTHOLOGY is the body of myths and teachings that belong to the ancient Greeks , concerning their gods and heroes , the nature of the world , and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. It was a part of the religion in ancient Greece . Modern scholars refer to and study the myths in an attempt to shed light on the religious and political institutions of ancient Greece and its civilization, and to gain understanding of the nature of myth-making itself. Greek mythology
Greek mythology
has had an extensive influence on the culture, arts, and literature of Western civilization and remains part of Western heritage and language. Poets and artists from ancient times to the present have derived inspiration from Greek mythology
Greek mythology
and have discovered contemporary significance and relevance in the themes
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Moira Buffini
MOIRA BUFFINI (born 29 May 1965) is an English dramatist, director, and actor. CONTENTS * 1 Early life * 2 Career * 3 Plays * 4 Filmography * 5 References * 6 External links EARLY LIFEBuffini was born in Cheshire
Cheshire
to Irish parents, and attended Northwich County Grammar School for Girls (became The County High School, Leftwich ). She studied English and Drama at Goldsmiths College , London University (1983–86). She subsequently trained as an actor at the Welsh College of Music and Drama . CAREERFor Jordan, co-written with Anna Reynolds in 1992, she won a Time Out Award for her performance and Writers' Guild Award for Best Fringe play. Her 1997 play Gabriel was performed at Soho theatre, winning the LWT Plays on Stage award and the Meyer-Whitworth Award
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Theban Cycle
The THEBAN CYCLE (Greek : Θηβαϊκὸς Κύκλος) is a collection of four lost epics of ancient Greek literature which related the mythical history of the Boeotian city of Thebes . They were composed in dactylic hexameter verse and were probably written down between 750 and 500 BC. The 9th-century AD scholar and clergyman Photius , in his Bibliotheca, considered the Theban Cycle part of the Epic Cycle ; however, modern scholars normally do not. The stories in the Theban Cycle were traditional ones: the two Homeric epics, the Iliad and Odyssey , display knowledge of many of them. The most famous stories in the Cycle were those of Oedipus and of the " Seven against Thebes ", both of which were heavily drawn on by later writers of Greek tragedy
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The Knight's Tale
"THE KNIGHT\'S TALE" (Middle English : The Knightes Tale) is the first tale from Geoffrey Chaucer
Geoffrey Chaucer
's The Canterbury Tales
The Canterbury Tales
. The story introduces various typical aspects of knighthood such as courtly love and ethical dilemmas. The story is written in iambic pentameter end-rhymed couplets. CONTENTS * 1 Sources and composition * 2 Synopsis * 3 The First Mover * 3.1 Background * 3.2 Summary * 3.3 Scholarly Interpretation * 4 Adaptations * 5 See also * 6 Notes * 7 References * 8 External links SOURCES AND COMPOSITIONThe epic poem Teseida (full title Teseida delle Nozze d’Emilia, or "The Theseid, Concerning the Nuptials of Emily") by Giovanni Boccaccio is the source of the tale, although Chaucer makes many significant diversions from that poem
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