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Credit Card
A credit card is a payment card issued to users (cardholders) to enable the cardholder to pay a merchant for goods and services based on the cardholder's promise to the card issuer to pay them for the amounts so paid plus the other agreed charges.[1] The card issuer (usually a bank) creates a revolving account and grants a line of credit to the cardholder, from which the cardholder can borrow money for payment to a merchant or as a cash advance. In other words, credit cards combine payment services with extensions of credit.[2] Complex fee structures in the credit card industry may limit customers' ability to comparison shop, help ensure that the industry is not price-competitive and help maximize industry profits
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Defined Benefit Pension Plan
A defined benefit pension plan is a type of pension plan in which an employer/sponsor promises a specified pension payment, lump-sum (or combination thereof) on retirement that is predetermined by a formula based on the employee's earnings history, tenure of service and age, rather than depending directly on individual investment returns. Traditionally, many governmental and public entities, as well as a large number of corporations, provided defined benefit plans, sometimes as a means of compensating workers in lieu of increased pay.[1] A defined benefit plan is 'defined' in the sense that the benefit formula is defined and known in advance
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Employment Contract
An employment contract or contract of employment is a kind of contract used in labour law to attribute rights and responsibilities between parties to a bargain. The contract is between an "employee" and an "employer". It has arisen out of the old master-servant law, used before the 20th century. But generally, the contract of employment denotes a relationship of economic dependence and social subordination. In the words of the controversial labour lawyer Sir Otto Kahn-Freund,"the relation between an employer and an isolated employee or worker is typically a relation between a bearer of power and one who is not a bearer of power. In its inception it is an act of submission, in its operation it is a condition of subordination, however much the submission and the subordination may be concealed by the indispensable figment of the legal mind known as the 'contract of employment'. The main object of labour law has been, and..
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Goods And Services
Goods are items that are tangible, such as pens, salt, shoes, hats and folders and Services are activities provided by other people, such as doctors, lawn care workers, dentists, barbers, waiters, or online servers. According to economic theory, consumption of goods and services is assumed to provide utility (satisfaction) to the consumer or end-user, although businesses also consume goods and services in the course of producing other goods and services.Contents1 History 2 The service-goods continuum 3 Goods and services
Goods and services
in international law 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksHistory[edit] Further information: Productive and unproductive labour Physiocratic economists categorized production into productive labour and unproductive labour
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Signature
A signature (/ˈsɪɡnətʃər/; from Latin: signare, "to sign") is a handwritten (and often stylized) depiction of someone's name, nickname, or even a simple "X" or other mark that a person writes on documents as a proof of identity and intent. The writer of a signature is a signatory or signer. Similar to a handwritten signature, a signature work describes the work as readily identifying its creator. A signature may be confused with an autograph, which is chiefly an artistic signature
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Cooperative
A cooperative (also known as co-operative, co-op, or coop) is "an autonomous association of persons united voluntarily to meet their common economic, social, and cultural needs and aspirations through a jointly-owned and democratically-controlled enterprise".[1] Cooperatives may include:non-profit community organizations businesses owned and managed by the people who use their services (a consumer cooperative) organisations managed by the people who work there (worker cooperatives) organisations managed by the people to whom they provide accommodation (housing cooperatives) hybrids such as worker cooperatives that are also consumer cooperatives or credit unions multi-stakeholder cooperatives such as those that bring together civil society and local actors to deliver community needs second- and third-tier cooperatives whose members are other cooperativesResearch published by the
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Estate Planning
SectionsAttestation clauseResiduary clauseIncorporation by referenceContestTestamentary capacityUndue influenceInsane delusion FraudNo-contest clauseProperty dispositionLapse and anti-lapseAdemption AbatementSatisfaction of legaciesActs of independent significanceElective share Pretermitted heirWills and conflict of lawsTrustsExpress ResultingConstructiveCommon typesBare DiscretionaryAccumulation and maintenanceInterest in possessionCharitable Purpose IncentiveOther typesProtective SpendthriftLife insurance RemainderLife interestReversionary interestTestamentaryHonorary Asset-protection Special
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Financial Independence
Financial independence means you have enough wealth to live on without working.[1][citation needed] Financially independent people have assets that generate income (cash flow) that is at least equal to their expenses. Income you earn without having to work a job is commonly referred to as "passive income".[2] For example, if someone receives $5000 in dividends from stocks they own, but their expenses total $4000, they can live on their dividend income because it pays for all their expenses to live (with some left over). Under these circumstances, a person is financially independent. A person's assets and liabilities are an important factor in determining if they have achieved financial independence
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Stockbroker
A stockbroker is a regulated professional individual, usually associated with a brokerage firm or broker-dealer, who buys and sells stocks and other securities for both retail and institutional clients through a stock exchange or over the counter in return for a fee or commission. Stockbrokers are known by numerous professional designations, depending on the license they hold, the type of securities they sell, or the services they provide. In the United States, a stockbroker must pass both the Series 7 and either the Series 63 or the Series 66 exams in order to be properly licensed.Contents1 History 2 Licensing and training requirements2.1 Canada 2.2 Hong Kong 2.3 India 2.4 Singapore 2.5 United Kingdom 2.6 United States3 Related professions 4 See also 5 ReferencesHistory[edit]Courtyard of the Amsterdam Stock
Stock
Exchange (Beurs van Hendrick de Keyser) by Emanuel de Witte, 1653
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Financial Adviser
A financial adviser is a professional who suggests and renders financial services to clients based on their financial situation. In many countries Financial Advisors have to complete specific training and hold a license to provide advices. In the United States
United States
for example a financial advisor carries a Series 65 or 66 license and according to the U.S. Financial Industry Regulatory Authority
Financial Industry Regulatory Authority
(FINRA), license designations and compliance issues must be reported for public view. [1] FINRA describes the main groups of investment professionals who may use the term financial adviser to be: brokers, investment advisers, accountants, lawyers, insurance agents and financial planners.[2]Contents1 Role 2 Compensation 3 Advisor vs
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Personal Budget
A personal budget or home budget is a finance plan that allocates future personal income towards expenses, savings and debt repayment. Past spending and personal debt are considered when creating a personal budget. There are several methods and tools available for creating, using and adjusting a personal budget. For example, jobs are an income source, while bills and rent payments are expenses.Contents1 Home budget 2 Tools 3 Concepts 4 Allocation guidelines4.1 The 60% Solution 4.2 Housing as 25% of spendable income5 Following a budget5.1 Spreadsheet
Spreadsheet
budgeting with date-shifting6 Avoid few pitfalls 7 See also 8 ReferencesHome budget[edit] A budget allocates or distributes expected income to expected expenses and intended savings
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Corporate Action
A corporate action is an event initiated by a public company that will bring an actual change to the securities—equity or debt—issued by the company. Corporate actions are typically agreed upon by a company's board of directors and authorized by the shareholders. Examples of corporate actions include stock splits, dividends, mergers and acquisitions, rights issues, and spin-offs.[1] Some corporate actions such as a dividend (for equity securities) or coupon payment (for debt securities) may have a direct financial impact on the shareholders or bondholders; another example is a call (early redemption) of a debt security. Other corporate actions such as stock split may have an indirect impact, as the increased liquidity of shares may cause the price of the stock to decrease
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Business Plan
A business plan is a formal statement of business goals, reasons they are attainable, and plans for reaching them. It may also contain background information about the organization or team attempting to reach those goals. Business plans may target changes in perception and branding by the customer, client, taxpayer, or larger community. When the existing business is to assume a major change or when planning a new venture, a 3 to 5 year business plan is required, since investors will look for their investment return in that timeframe.[1]Contents1 Audience 2 Content 3 Presentation 4 Revising the business plan4.1 Cost overruns and revenue shortfalls5 Legal and liability issues5.1 Disclosure requirements 5.2 Limitations on content and audience6 Open business plans 7 Uses 8 Not for profit businesses 9 Satires 10 See also 11 ReferencesAudience[edit] Business plans may be internally or externally focused
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Social Security
Social security
Social security
is "any government system that provides monetary assistance to people with an inadequate or no income."[1] Social security
Social security
is enshrined in Article 22 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which states:Everyone, as a member of society, has the right to social security and is entitled to realizat
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Defined Contribution Plan
A defined contribution (DC) plan is a type of retirement plan in which the employer, employee or both make contributions on a regular basis.[1] Individual accounts are set up for participants and benefits are based on the amounts credited to these accounts (through employee contributions and, if applicable, employer contributions) plus any investment earnings on the money in the account. In defined contribution plans, future benefits fluctuate on the basis of investment earnings. The most common type of defined contribution plan is a savings and thrift plan
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Merchant
A merchant is a person who trades in commodities produced by other people. A merchant historically was anyone who was involved in business as long as industry, commerce, and trade have existed. The status of the merchant has varied during different periods of history and among different societies. In modern times, the term occasionally has been used to refer to a businessperson or someone undertaking activities (commercial or industrial) for the purpose of generating profit, cash flow, sales, and revenue utilizing a combination of human, financial, intellectual and physical capital with a view to fueling economic development and growth.A scale or balance is often used to symbolise a merchantMerchants have been known for as long as humans have engaged in trade and commerce. Merchants and merchant networks were known to operate in ancient Babylonia and Assyria, China, Egypt, Greece, India, Persia, Phoenicia and Rome
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