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Creative Commons Attribution
A Creative Commons
Creative Commons
(CC) license is one of several public copyright licenses that enable the free distribution of an otherwise copyrighted work. A CC license is used when an author wants to give people the right to share, use, and build upon a work that they have created. CC provides an author flexibility (for example, they might choose to allow only non-commercial uses of their own work) and protects the people who use or redistribute an author's work from concerns of copyright infringement as long as they abide by the conditions that are specified in the license by which the author distributes the work.[1][2][3][4][5] There are several types of CC licenses. The licenses differ by several combinations that condition the terms of distribution. They were initially released on December 16, 2002 by Creative Commons, a U.S. non-profit corporation founded in 2001
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GateHouse Media
GateHouse Media
GateHouse Media
Inc. (formerly Liberty Group Publishing), a holding company for New Media Investment Group
New Media Investment Group
(NYSE: NEWM), former symbol on OTC Markets Group's OTCQB tier GHSE, is one of the largest publishers of locally-based print and digital media in the United States, headquartered in the town of Pittsford, New York.[2] As of September 2017, GateHouse Media
GateHouse Media
publishes 130 daily newspapers, 640 community publications and over 540 local market websites in 36 states
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Open Source Initiative
The Open Source Initiative
Open Source Initiative
(OSI) is a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting open-source software. The organization was founded in late February 1998 by Bruce Perens
Bruce Perens
and Eric S. Raymond, part of a group inspired by the Netscape Communications Corporation publishing the source code for its flagship Netscape Communicator
Netscape Communicator
product. Later, in August 1998, the organization added a board of directors. Raymond was president from its founding until February 2005, followed briefly by Russ Nelson
Russ Nelson
and then Michael Tiemann
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Creative Commons Jurisdiction Ports
Jurisdiction
Jurisdiction
(from the Latin
Latin
ius, iuris meaning "law" and dicere meaning "to speak") is the practical authority granted to a legal body to administer justice within a defined field of responsibility, e.g., Michigan tax law. In federations like the United States, areas of jurisdiction apply to local, state, and federal levels; e.g. the court has jurisdiction to apply federal law. Colloquially it is used to refer to the geographical area to which such authority applies, e.g. the court has jurisdiction over all of Colorado
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Jurisdictions
Jurisdiction
Jurisdiction
(from the Latin
Latin
ius, iuris meaning "law" and dicere meaning "to speak") is the practical authority granted to a legal body to administer justice within a defined field of responsibility, e.g., Michigan tax law. In federations like the United States, areas of jurisdiction apply to local, state, and federal levels; e.g. the court has jurisdiction to apply federal law. Colloquially it is used to refer to the geographical area to which such authority applies, e.g. the court has jurisdiction over all of Colorado
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Permissive License
A permissive software license, sometimes also called BSD-like or BSD-style license,[2] is a free software software license with minimal requirements about how the software can be redistributed. Examples include the MIT License, BSD licenses, Apple Public Source License and the Apache license
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Wikimedia Deutschland
Wikimedia chapters are national or sub-national not-for-profit organisations created to promote the interests of Wikimedia projects locally. Chapters are legally independent of the Wikimedia Foundation, entering into a "Chapters Agreement" with the Foundation following acceptance by the Affiliations Committee (formerly known as "Chapters Committee"), and have no control over Foundation websites
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CCO (other)
CCO or cco may refer to: Organizational positions:Chief channel officer, the executive responsible for indirect revenue with a partner within an organization Chief commercial officer, the executive responsible for commercial strategy and development Chief communications officer, or sometimes, Corporate communications officer, the executive responsible for communications, public relations or public affairs or both Chief compliance officer, the executive responsible for compliance with regulatory requirements Chief content officer, the executive responsible for content in broadcasting Chief creative officer, the executive responsible for the creative team of a company Chief customer officer, the executive responsible for the total relationship with customers Civilian Communications Officer, a position in the Central Communications Command of London's M
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Public Domain Mark
Public Domain Mark
Public Domain Mark
(PDM) is a symbol used to indicate that a work is free of known copyright restrictions and therefore in the public domain. It is analogous to the copyright symbol, which is commonly used to indicate as copyright notice that a work is copyrighted. The Public Domain Mark
Public Domain Mark
was developed by Creative Commons.[1][2] References[edit]^ " Creative Commons
Creative Commons
announces the Public Domain Mark". The H
The H
Open. The H. 2010-10-12. Retrieved 2010-10-12.  ^ Diane Peters (2010-10-11). "Improving Access to the Public Domain: the Public Domain Mark". Creative Commons
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Public Domain Equivalent License
Public domain
Public domain
equivalent license are licenses that grant public-domain-like rights or/and act as waivers. They are used to make copyrighted works usable by anyone without conditions, while avoiding the complexities of attribution or license compatibility that occur with other licenses. The extremely permissive terms of public domain equivalent licenses meet the definition of copyfree licenses.Contents1 Description 2 Licenses 3 Reception 4 See also 5 Footnotes 6 ReferencesDescription[edit] No permission or license is required for a work truly in the public domain, such as one with an expired copyright; such a work may be copied at will. Public domain
Public domain
equivalent licenses exist because some legal jurisdictions do not provide for authors to voluntarily place their work in the public domain, but do allow them to grant arbitrarily broad rights in the work to the public
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List Of FSF Approved Software Licenses
Approved may refer to: Approved drug, a preparation that has been validated for a therapeutic use by a ruling authority of a government Approved, a 2013 album by Chester Thompson
Chester Thompson
Trio
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Public Domain Software
Public-domain software
Public-domain software
is software that has been placed in the public domain: in other words, there is absolutely no ownership such as copyright, trademark, or patent. Software
Software
in the public domain can be modified, distributed, or sold even without any attribution by anyone; this is unlike the common case of software under exclusive copyright, where software licenses grant limited usage rights. Under the Berne Convention, which most countries have signed, an author automatically obtains the exclusive copyright to anything they have written, and local law may similarly grant copyright, patent, or trademark rights by default. The Berne Convention also covers programs. Therefore, a program is automatically subject to a copyright, and if it is to be placed in the public domain, the author must explicitly disclaim the copyright and other rights on it in some way, e.g
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Software Patent
Software
Software
patent Debate Free software List of patentsTreatiesTRIPS Agreement Patent
Patent
Cooperation Treaty European Patent
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GNU General Public License
The GNU
GNU
General Public License ( GNU
GNU
GPL
GPL
or GPL) is a widely used free software license, which guarantees end users the freedom to run, study, share and modify the software.[7] The license was originally written by Richard Stallman
Richard Stallman
of the Free Software Foundation
Free Software Foundation
(FSF) for the GNU
GNU
Project, and grants the recipients of a computer program the rights of the Free Software Definition.[8] The GPL
GPL
is a copyleft license, which means that derivative work can only be distributed under the same license terms. This is in distinction to permissive free software licenses, of which the BSD licenses and the MIT License are widely used examples
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Stock Photography
Stock photography
Stock photography
is the supply of photographs, which are often licensed for specific uses.[1] The stock photo industry, which began to gain hold in the 1920s,[1] has established models including traditional macrostock photography,[2] midstock photography,[3] and microstock photography.[4] Conventional stock agencies charge from several hundred to several thousand American dollars per image, while microstock photography may sell for around USD 25 cents.[4] Professional stock photographers traditionally place their images with one or more stock agencies on a contractual basis,[1] while stock agencies may accept the high-quality photos of amateur photographers through online submission.[5] Themes for stock photos are diverse, although Megan Garber of The Atlantic wrote in 2012 that "one of the more wacky/wondrous elements of stock photos is the manner in which, as a genre, they've developed a unifying editorial sensibility
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Lawrence Lessig
Lester Lawrence "Larry" Lessig III (born June 3, 1961) is an American academic, attorney, and political activist. He is the Roy L. Furman Professor of Law at Harvard Law School
Harvard Law School
and the former director of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard University.[1] Lessig was a candidate for the Democratic Party's nomination for President of the United States
United States
in the 2016 U.S. presidential election, but withdrew before the primaries. Lessig is a proponent of reduced legal restrictions on copyright, trademark, and radio frequency spectrum, particularly in technology applications. In 2001, he founded Creative Commons, a non-profit organization devoted to expanding the range of creative works available for others to build upon and to share legally
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