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Courtroom
A courtroom is the enclosed space in which courts of law are held in front of a judge. A number of courtrooms, which may also be known as "courts", may be housed in a courthouse.Contents1 By country1.1 United States 1.2 United Kingdom1.2.1 England and Wales 1.2.2 Scotland2 ReferencesBy country[edit] United States[edit]A courtroom at the United States District Court
Court
for the District of Massachusetts at Worcester, MassachusettsThe judge generally sits behind a raised desk, known as the bench. Behind the judge are the great seal of the jurisdiction and the flags of the appropriate federal and state governments. Judges usually wear a plain black robe (a requirement in many jurisdictions). An exception was the late U.S. Supreme Court
Court
Chief Justice William Rehnquist, who broke tradition by adorning his robe with four gold stripes on each sleeve
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Brockville
Brockville, formerly Elizabethtown, is a city in Eastern Ontario, Canada
Canada
in the Thousand Islands
Thousand Islands
region. Although it is the seat of the United Counties of Leeds and Grenville, it is politically independent of the county. It is included with Leeds and Grenville for census purposes only. Known as the " City
City
of the 1000 Islands", Brockville
Brockville
is on the north shore of the Saint Lawrence River
Saint Lawrence River
opposite Morristown, New York, about halfway between Ontario's Cornwall to the east and Kingston to the west. It is 115 kilometres (71 miles) south of the national capital of Ottawa
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Closed Circuit Television
Closed-circuit television
Closed-circuit television
(CCTV), also known as video surveillance,[1][2] is the use of video cameras to transmit a signal to a specific place, on a limited set of monitors. It differs from broadcast television in that the signal is not openly transmitted, though it may employ point to point (P2P), point to multipoint (P2MP), or mesh wired or wireless links. Though almost all video cameras fit this definition, the term is most often applied to those used for surveillance in areas that may need monitoring such as banks, stores, and other areas where security is needed. Though Videotelephony
Videotelephony
is seldom called "CCTV" one exception is the use of video in distance education, where it is an important tool.[3][4] Surveillance
Surveillance
of the public using CCTV is common in many areas around the world
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Japan
Coordinates: 35°N 136°E / 35°N 136°E / 35; 136Japan 日本国 Nippon-koku or Nihon-kokuFlagImperial SealAnthem: "Kimigayo" 君が代"His Imperial Majesty's Reign"[2][3] Government
Government
Seal of JapanGo-Shichi no Kiri (五七桐)Area controlled by Japan
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Kazakhstan
Kazakhstan[b] (Kazakh: Қазақстан, translit. Qazaqstan, IPA: [qɑzɑqˈstɑn] ( listen); Russian: Казахстан, IPA: [kəzɐxˈstan]), officially the Republic
Republic
of Kazakhstan
Kazakhstan
(Kazakh: Қазақстан Республикасы, translit. Qazaqstan Respýblıkasy; Russian: Республика Казахстан, tr. Respublika Kazakhstan),[4][13] is the world's largest landlocked country, and the ninth largest in the world, with an area of 2,724,900 square kilometres (1,052,100 sq mi).[4][14] Kazakhstan
Kazakhstan
is the dominant nation of Central Asia
Central Asia
economically, generating 60% of the region's GDP, primarily through its oil/gas industry
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Advocate Depute
The Crown
The Crown
Office and Procurator Fiscal
Procurator Fiscal
Service (Scottish Gaelic: Oifis an Ard-Ghnìomhachas agus Seirbheis Neach-casaid an Ard-Ghnìomhachas, Scots: Croun Office an Procurator Fiscal
Procurator Fiscal
Service) is the independent public prosecution service for Scotland, and is a Ministerial Department of the Scottish Government. The department is headed by Her Majesty's Lord Advocate, who under the Scottish legal system is responsible for prosecution, along with the area Procurators fiscal. In Scotland, virtually all prosecution of criminal offences is undertaken by the Crown
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Procurator Fiscal
A procurator fiscal (pl. procurators fiscal), sometimes called PF or fiscal, is a public prosecutor in Scotland
Scotland
(who, despite the title, has little to do with fiscal issues). They investigate all sudden and suspicious deaths in Scotland
Scotland
(similar to a coroner in other legal systems), conduct fatal accident inquiries (a form of inquest unique to the Scottish legal system) and handle criminal complaints against the police (administrative complaints are handled by the Police Complaints Commissioner for Scotland). They also receive reports from specialist reporting agencies such as Her Majesty's Revenue and Customs.[1] For the majority of crimes in Scotland, the procurators fiscal present cases for the prosecution in the sheriff, district and justice of the peace courts, and the case for the defence is presented either by the accused, a solicitor, or an advocate
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City Of London
The City of London
London
is a city and county that contains the historic centre and the primary central business district (CBD) of London. It constituted most of London
London
from its settlement by the Romans in the 1st century AD to the Middle Ages, but the agglomeration has since grown far beyond the City's borders.[3][4] The City is now only a tiny part of the metropolis of London, though it remains a notable part of central London. Administratively, it forms one of the 33 local authority districts of Greater London; however, the City of London
London
is not a London
London
borough, a status reserved for the other 32 districts (including London's only other city, the City of Westminster)
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Coat Of Arms Of The United Kingdom
The royal coat of arms of the United Kingdom, or the Royal Arms for short, is the official coat of arms of the British monarch,[1][2] currently Queen Elizabeth II. These arms are used by the Queen in her official capacity as monarch of the United Kingdom. Variants of the Royal Arms are used by other members of the British royal family; and by the British government
British government
in connection with the administration and government of the country. In Scotland, there exists a separate version of the Royal Arms, a variant of which is used by the Scotland Office
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United Kingdom
The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
(UK) or Britain, is a sovereign country in western Europe
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Nottingham
Nottingham
Nottingham
(/ˈnɒtɪŋəm/ ( listen) NOT-ing-əm) is a city and unitary authority area in Nottinghamshire, England, 128 miles (206 km) north of London, in the East Midlands. Nottingham
Nottingham
has links to the legend of Robin Hood
Robin Hood
and to the lace-making, bicycle (notably Raleigh bikes), and tobacco industries. It was granted its city charter in 1897 as part of Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee celebrations. Nottingham
Nottingham
is a tourist destination; in 2011, visitors spent over £1.5 billion—the thirteenth-highest amount in England's 111 statistical territories.[6] In 2015, Nottingham
Nottingham
had an estimated population of 321,550[7] with the wider urban area, which includes many of the city's suburbs, having a population of 915,977
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Docket (court)
A docket in the United States is the official summary of proceedings in a court of law.[1][2] In the United Kingdom in modern times it is an official document relating to delivery of something,[2] with similar meanings to these two elsewhere. In the late nineteenth century the term referred to a large folio book in which clerks recorded all filings and court proceedings for each case,[3] although use has been documented since 1485.[4][5]Contents1 Historical usage 2 United States2.1 Supreme Court 2.2 Court
Court
docket links2.2.1 Official 2.2.2 Unofficial3 See also 4 ReferencesHistorical usage[edit] The term originated in England; it was recorded in the form "doggette" in 1485, and later also as doket, dogget(t), docquett, docquet, and docket.[4] The derivation and original sense are obscure, although it has been suggested that it derives from the verb "to dock", in the sense of cutting short (e.g
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Sidebar (law)
In the United States, the sidebar is an area in a courtroom near the judge's bench where lawyers may be called to speak with the judge so that the jury cannot hear the conversation and/or they may speak off the record. Lawyers make a formal request by stating "may I approach the bench?" or, simply "may I approach?" to initiate a sidebar conference. If it is granted, then opposing counsel must be allowed to come forward and participate in the conversation.[1] The term is also used generically to describe any conversation where some participants in a proceeding or meeting may step aside to discuss information not shared with the group. References[edit]^ "sidebar". TheFreeDictionary.com. This legal term article is a stub
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White Noise
In signal processing, white noise is a random signal having equal intensity at different frequencies, giving it a constant power spectral density.[1] The term is used, with this or similar meanings, in many scientific and technical disciplines, including physics, acoustic engineering, telecommunications, and statistical forecasting. White noise
White noise
refers to a statistical model for signals and signal sources, rather than to any specific signal. White noise
White noise
draws its name from white light,[2] although light that appears white generally does not have a flat power spectral density over the visible band.A "white noise" imageIn discrete time, white noise is a discrete signal whose samples are regarded as a sequence of serially uncorrelated random variables with zero mean and finite variance; a single realization of white noise is a random shock
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Duplex (telecommunications)
A duplex communication system is a point-to-point system composed of two connected parties or devices that can communicate with one another in both directions. Duplex systems are employed in many communications networks, either to allow for a communication "two-way street" between two connected parties or to provide a "reverse path" for the monitoring and remote adjustment of equipment in the field. There are two types of duplex communication systems: full-duplex (FDX) and half-duplex (HDX). In a full-duplex system, both parties can communicate with each other simultaneously. An example of a full-duplex device is a telephone; the parties at both ends of a call can speak and be heard by the other party simultaneously
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