HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

County Of Toulouse
Dark Green: Comtal lands Green: Vassal lands Yellow: Limits of Trencavel
Trencavel
demesneCapital TolosaLanguages Medieval Latin Old OccitanReligion Roman Catholicism
Roman Catholicism
(official) Cathari
[...More...]

"County Of Toulouse" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Latin Language
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
[...More...]

"Latin Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Carloman, Son Of Pippin III
Pippin, Peppin, Pepin or Pipin may refer to:Pippin (musical), a Broadway musical by Stephen Schwartz loosely based on the life of Pepin the Hunchback Pippin (comics), a children's comic produced from 1966 to 1986 Pippin apple, a kind of apple, any of several cultivars, sometimes referred to as pippinContents1 People1.1 Carolingians 1.2 Other people2 Characters 3 Places 4 Other 5 See alsoPeople[edit] Not to be confused with the surname Pippen. Carolingians[edit] Pippin, Peppin, and Pepin (Old French pépin "seed") are variants of a single Frankish given name borne by the following figures in the Carolingian family that ruled the Frankish Empire in what is now France and the western parts of Germany in the Middle Ages:Pepin of Landen, nicknamed the Elder, sometimes listed as a saint Pepin of Herstal, nicknamed the Middle Pepin the Short or Pippin the Younger, father of Charlemagne Pepin the Hunchback, first son of Charlemagne Pepin of Ital
[...More...]

"Carloman, Son Of Pippin III" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Rouergue
Rouergue
Rouergue
(Occitan: Roergue) is a former province of France, corresponding roughly with the modern department of Aveyron. Its historical capital is Rodez.[1] It is bounded on the north by Auvergne, on the south and southwest by Languedoc, on the east by Gévaudan
Gévaudan
and on the west by Quercy.[2] During the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
Rouergue
Rouergue
changed hands a number of times, its rulers including England (due to the Treaty of Brétigny
Treaty of Brétigny
in 1360), Armagnac and Languedoc. Rouergue
Rouergue
became a department in 1790, and was renamed Aveyron
Aveyron
after the principal river flowing through it
[...More...]

"Rouergue" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Albi
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Albi
Albi
(French pronunciation: ​[albi]; Occitan: Albi [ˈalβi])[1] is a commune in southern France. It is the prefecture of the Tarn department, on the river Tarn, 85 km northeast of Toulouse. Its inhabitants are called Albigensians (French: Albigeois, Albigeoise(s), Occitan: albigés -esa(s)). It is the seat of the Archbishop of Albi
[...More...]

"Albi" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Nîmes
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Nîmes
Nîmes
(/niːm/; French: [nim]; Provençal Occitan: Nimes [ˈnimes]) is a city in the Occitanie
Occitanie
region of southern France. It is the capital of the Gard
Gard
department. Nîmes
Nîmes
is located between the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
and the Cévennes mountains
[...More...]

"Nîmes" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Provence
Provence
Provence
(/prəˈvɒns/; French pronunciation: ​[pʁɔ.vɑ̃s]; Provençal: Provença in classical norm or Prouvènço in Mistralian norm, pronounced [pʀuˈvɛⁿsɔ]) is a geographical region and historical province of southeastern France, which extends from the left bank of the lower Rhône
[...More...]

"Provence" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Gallia Narbonensis
Gallia Narbonensis
Gallia Narbonensis
( Latin
Latin
for " Gaul
Gaul
of Narbonne", from its chief settlement)[n 1] was a Roman province
Roman province
located in what is now Languedoc and Provence, in southern France. It was also known as Provincia Nostra ("Our Province"), from its having been the first Roman province
Roman province
north of the Alps, and as Gallia Transalpina ("Transalpine Gaul"), distinguishing it from Cisalpine Gaul
Cisalpine Gaul
in northern Italy. It became a Roman province
Roman province
in the late 2nd century BC. Its boundaries were roughly defined by the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
to the south and the Cévennes
Cévennes
and Alps
Alps
to the north and west
[...More...]

"Gallia Narbonensis" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Emirate Of Córdoba
The Emirate
Emirate
of Córdoba (Arabic: إمارة قرطبة‎, Imārah Qurṭuba) was an independent emirate in the Iberian Peninsula
Iberian Peninsula
ruled by the Umayyad dynasty with Córdoba as its capital. After the Umayyad conquest of Hispania
Umayyad conquest of Hispania
in 711–718, the Iberian Peninsula was established as a province under the Umayyad Caliphate. The rulers of this province established their capital in Córdoba and received from the Umayyad Caliphate
Umayyad Caliphate
the title of wali or emir. In 756, Abd al-Rahman I, a prince of the deposed Umayyad royal family, refused to recognize the authority of the Abbasid Caliphate
Abbasid Caliphate
and became an independent emir of Córdoba. He had been on the run for six years after the Umayyads had lost the position of caliph in Damascus
Damascus
in 750 to the Abbasids
[...More...]

"Emirate Of Córdoba" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Kingdom Of The Franks
Francia, also called the Kingdom of the Franks
Franks
(Latin: Regnum Francorum), or Frankish Empire
Empire
was the largest post-Roman Barbarian kingdom in Western Europe. It was ruled by the Franks
Franks
during Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages. The core Frankish territories inside the Roman empire
Roman empire
were close to the Rhine
Rhine
and Maas rivers in the north. After a period where small kingdoms inter-acted with the remaining Gallo-Roman institutions to their south, a single kingdom uniting them was founded by Clovis I
Clovis I
who was crowned King of the Franks
Franks
in 496
[...More...]

"Kingdom Of The Franks" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Pippin The Short
Pepin the Short[a] (German: Pippin der Kurze, French: Pépin le Bref, c. 714 – 24 September 768) was the King of the Franks from 751 until his death. He was the first of the Carolingians to become king.[b][2] The younger son of the Frankish prince Charles Martel and his wife Rotrude, Pepin's upbringing was distinguished by the ecclesiastical education he had received from the monks of St. Denis. Succeeding his father as the Mayor of the Palace in 741, Pepin reigned over Francia jointly with his elder brother Carloman. Pepin ruled in Neustria, Burgundy, and Provence, while his brother Carloman established himself in Austrasia, Alemannia and Thuringia. The brothers were active in suppressing revolts led by the Bavarians, Aquitanians, Saxons, and the Alemanni in the early years of their reign
[...More...]

"Pippin The Short" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Siege Of Narbonne (752–59)
The Siege of Narbonne took place between 752 and 759 led by Pepin the Short against the Umayyad stronghold defended by an Andalusian garrison and its Gothic and Gallo-Roman inhabitants. The siege remained as a key battlefield in the context of the Carolingian expedition south to Provence and Septimania starting in 752
[...More...]

"Siege Of Narbonne (752–59)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Hunald II
Hunald II, also spelled Hunold, Hunoald, Hunuald or Chunoald (French: Hunaud), was the Duke of Aquitaine from 768 until 769. He was probably the son of Duke Waiofar, who was assassinated on the orders of King Pippin the Short in 768. He laid claim to the duchy following Pippin's death later that year, but his revolt was crushed by Pippin's eldest son, Charlemagne. Hunald fled to the Duchy of Gascony, but he was handed over to Charlemagne and put into captivity. Nothing more is heard of him. Following the naming patterns of the time, Hunald was probably named after his grandfather, Hunald I.[1] All the members of his family, including himself, bore names of Germanic origin.[2] Certain historians have advanced the hypothesis that Hunald I, who retired to a monastery in 745, came out of retirement to lead it again in 768. This is unlikely on chronological grounds, and there is a tradition that Hunald I died at Rome in 756
[...More...]

"Hunald II" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Occitan Language
Occitan
Occitan
(English: /ˈɒksɪtən, -tæn, -tɑːn/;[8][9] Occitan: [utsiˈta];[10] French: [ɔksitɑ̃]), also known as lenga d'òc (Occitan: [ˈleŋɡɔ ˈðɔ(k)] ( listen); French: langue d'oc) by its native speakers, is a Romance language. It is spoken in southern France, Italy's Occitan
Occitan
Valleys, Monaco, and Spain's Val d'Aran; collectively, these regions are sometimes referred to as Occitania. Occitan
Occitan
is also spoken in the linguistic enclave of Guardia Piemontese
Guardia Piemontese
(Calabria, Italy). However, there is controversy about the unity of the language, as some think that Occitan
Occitan
is a macrolanguage
[...More...]

"Occitan Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Roncesvalles
Roncesvalles
Roncesvalles
(Spanish pronunciation: [ronθezˈβaʎes]; Basque: Orreaga [oreaɣa], Aragonese: Ronzesbals [ronθesˈbals], French: Roncevaux [ʁɔ̃s(ə)vo]) is a small village and municipality in Navarre, northern Spain
[...More...]

"Roncesvalles" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Basque People
The Basques
Basques
(/bɑːsks/ or /bæsks/; Basque: euskaldunak [eus̺kaldunak]; Spanish: vascos [ˈbaskos]; French: basques [bask]) are an indigenous ethnic group[6][7][8] characterised by the Basque language, a common culture and shared ancestry to the ancient Vascones and Aquitanians.[9] Basques
[...More...]

"Basque People" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.