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County Dublin
County
County
Dublin
Dublin
(Irish: Contae Bhaile Átha Cliath[1] or Contae Átha Cliath) is a county in Ireland. Since the abolition of Dublin
Dublin
County Council in 1994, for local government it has been divided into four administrative areas: Dublin
Dublin
city, Dún Laoghaire–Rathdown, Fingal and South Dublin
Dublin
(as numbered 1 to 4 in the figure below). The population of the entire county was 1,345,402 according to the census of 2016.[2] It is conterminous with the Dublin
Dublin
Region and is in the province of Leinster. It is named after the city of Dublin, which is the regional capital and the capital city of Ireland
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Library
A library is a collection of sources of information and similar resources, made accessible to a defined community for reference or borrowing.[1] It provides physical or digital access to material, and may be a physical building or room, or a virtual space, or both.[2] A library's collection can include books, periodicals, newspapers, manuscripts, films, maps, prints, documents, microform, CDs, cassettes, videotapes, DVDs, Blu-ray
Blu-ray
Discs, e-books, audiobooks, databases, and other formats. Libraries range in size from a few shelves of books to several million items. In Latin and Greek, the idea of a bookcase is represented by Bibliotheca and Bibliothēkē (Greek: βιβλιοθήκη): derivatives of these mean library in many modern languages, e.g. French bibliothèque. The first libraries consisted of archives of the earliest form of writing—the clay tablets in cuneiform script discovered in Sumer, some dating back to 2600 BC
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Act Of The Oireachtas
218 members158 TDs 60 SenatorsDáil Éireann political groupsGovernment (57)     Fine Gael
Fine Gael
(50)      Independent Alliance (5)      Independent (2) Confidence and supply (44)    
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Shire
A shire is a traditional term for a division of land, found in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
and some other English speaking countries. It was first used in Wessex
Wessex
from the beginning of Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
settlement, and spread to most of the rest of England
England
in the tenth century
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John, King Of England
John (24 December 1166 – 19 October 1216), also known as John Lackland (Norman French: Johan sanz Terre),[1] was King of England from 6 April 1199 until his death in 1216. John lost the Duchy of Normandy
Normandy
to King Philip II of France, resulting in the collapse of most of the Angevin Empire
Angevin Empire
and contributing to the subsequent growth in power of the Capetian dynasty
Capetian dynasty
during the 13th century. The baronial revolt at the end of John's reign led to the sealing of the Magna Carta, a document sometimes considered an early step in the evolution of the constitution of the United Kingdom. John, the youngest of five sons of King Henry II of England
Henry II of England
and Duchess Eleanor of Aquitaine, was at first not expected to inherit significant lands
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Norman Invasion Of Ireland
The Norman invasion of Ireland
Ireland
took place in stages during the late 12th century, at a time when Gaelic Ireland
Gaelic Ireland
was made up of several kingdoms, with a High King claiming lordship over all. In May 1169, Cambro-Norman
Cambro-Norman
mercenaries landed in Ireland
Ireland
at the request of Diarmait Mac Murchada
Diarmait Mac Murchada
(Dermot MacMurragh), the ousted King of Leinster, who had sought their help in regaining his kingdom. Diarmait and the Normans
Normans
seized Leinster
Leinster
within weeks and launched raids into neighbouring kingdoms. This military intervention had the backing of King Henry II of England
Henry II of England
and was authorized by Pope Adrian IV. In the summer of 1170, there were two further Norman landings, led by Richard "Strongbow" de Clare
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Statutory Instrument
In many countries, a statutory instrument is a form of delegated legislation.Contents1 United Kingdom1.1 England
England
and Wales 1.2 Scotland 1.3 Northern Ireland2 Republic of Ireland 3 United States 4 Other countries 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksUnited Kingdom[edit] Statutory instruments are the principal form of delegated or secondary legislation in the United Kingdom. England
England
and Wales[edit] Main article: Statutory instrument (UK) In England
England
and Wales, statutory instruments (or "regulations")[1] are primarily governed by the Statutory Instruments Act 1946,[2] which replaced the system of statutory rules and orders governed by the Rules Publication Act 1893. Wales
Wales
Statutory Instruments are published as a subseries of the UK statutory instrument series—for example, the Environment (Wales) Act 2016 (Commencement No
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Eurostat
Council
Council
of the EU PresidencyConfigurationsGeneral Foreign Justice and Home EconomicEuroLegislative procedure Voting SecretariatSecretary-GeneralUwe CorsepiusDirectorates-general COREPERJudiciaryCourt of JusticeMembers RulingsGeneral CourtCentral BankPresident DraghiESCB Euro EMU EurozoneCourt of AuditorsBudget OLAFOther bodiesAgencies Investment Bank CoR EESC Ombudsman National parliamentsPolicies and issuesForeign relationsHigh RepresentativeFederica MogheriniExt
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Local Government
A local government is a form of public administration which, in a majority of contexts, exists as the lowest tier of administration within a given state. The term is used to contrast with offices at state level, which are referred to as the central government, national government, or (where appropriate) federal government and also to supranational government which deals with governing institutions between states. Local governments generally act within powers delegated to them by legislation or directives of the higher level of government. In federal states, local government generally comprises the third (or sometimes fourth) tier of government, whereas in unitary states, local government usually occupies the second or third tier of government, often with greater powers than higher-level administrative divisions. The question of municipal autonomy is a key question of public administration and governance
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Dublin West (Dáil Éireann Constituency)
Éire
Éire
(Irish: [ˈeːɾʲə] ( listen)) is Irish for "Ireland", the name of an island and a sovereign state. The English pronunciation is /ˈɛərə/ (AIR-ə).Contents1 Etymology1.1 Difference between Éire
Éire
and Erin2 As a state name 3 Spelling Eire rather than Éire 4 Other uses 5 Footnotes 6 BibliographyEtymology[edit] Further information: Ériu, Erin, Hibernia, and Iverni The modern Irish Éire
Éire
evolved from the Old Irish word Ériu, which was the name of a Gaelic goddess. Ériu
Ériu
is generally believed to have been the matron goddess of Ireland, a goddess of sovereignty, or simply a goddess of the land
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Local Authority
A local government is a form of public administration which, in a majority of contexts, exists as the lowest tier of administration within a given state. The term is used to contrast with offices at state level, which are referred to as the central government, national government, or (where appropriate) federal government and also to supranational government which deals with governing institutions between states. Local governments generally act within powers delegated to them by legislation or directives of the higher level of government. In federal states, local government generally comprises the third (or sometimes fourth) tier of government, whereas in unitary states, local government usually occupies the second or third tier of government, often with greater powers than higher-level administrative divisions. The question of municipal autonomy is a key question of public administration and governance
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Local Government Act 2001
The Local Government Act, 2001 (No. 37 of 2001) was enacted by the Oireachtas
Oireachtas
of Ireland on 21 July 2001. Most of the provisions of the Act came into operation on 1 January 2002. The act was a restatement and amendment of previous legislation, which was centred on the Local Government (Ireland) Act 1898
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Local Administrative Unit
Generally, a local administrative unit (LAU) is a low level administrative division of a country, ranked below a province, region, or state. Not all countries describe their locally governed areas this way, but it can be descriptively applied anywhere to refer to counties, municipalities, etc. In the European Union, LAUs are basic components of Classification of Territorial Units for Statistics (NUTS) regions. For each EU member country, two levels of Local Administrative Units (LAU) are defined: LAU 1 and LAU 2, which were previously called NUTS 4 and NUTS 5 respectively, until the NUTS regulation went into force in July 2003. For some countries, the LAU 1 level is not defined, and thus equivalent to the NUTS 3 level
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NUTS 3 Statistical Regions Of The Republic Of Ireland
There are eight regions at NUTS III
NUTS III
level in Ireland. The NUTS regions for Ireland were agreed between Eurostat
Eurostat
and the Government of Ireland, in line with the minimum and maximum population thresholds set out by Eurostat
Eurostat
for the size of NUTS regions. The geographical remit of each region is defined by combining the areas under the jurisdiction of LAU-1 units of local government — the counties and cities of Ireland. Prior to 2014,[1] each region was governed by an associated Regional Assembly.[2] Since that date, the association between Regional Assemblies and NUTS regions has ceased
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Public Services
Public service[1][not in citation given] is a service which is provided by government to people living within its jurisdiction, either directly (through the public sector) or by financing provision of services. The term is associated with a social consensus (usually expressed through democratic elections) that certain services should be available to all, regardless of income, physical ability or mental acuity. Even where public services are neither publicly provided nor publicly financed, for social and political reasons they are usually subject to regulation going beyond that applying to most economic sectors. Public policy[2][not in citation given] when made in the public's interest and motivations can provide public services. Public service is also a course that can be studied at a college or university
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Sanitation
Sanitation
Sanitation
refers to public health conditions related to clean drinking water and adequate treatment and disposal of human excreta and sewage.[1] Preventing human contact with feces is part of sanitation, as is hand washing with soap. Sanitation
Sanitation
system aim to protect human health by providing a clean environment that will stop the transmission of disease, especially through the fecal-oral route.[2] For example, diarrhea, a main cause of malnutrition and stunted growth in children, can be reduced through sanitation.[3] There are many other diseases which are easily transmitted in communities that have low levels of sanitation, such as ascariasis (a type of intestinal worm infection or helminthiasis), cholera, hepatitis, polio, schistosomiasis, trachoma, to name just a few. A range of sanitation technologies and approaches exists
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