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Counterphobic Attitude
Counterphobic attitude is a response to anxiety that, instead of fleeing the source of fear in the manner of a phobia, actively seeks it out, in the hope of overcoming the original anxiousness.[1] Contrary to the avoidant personality disorder, the counterphobic represents the less usual, but not totally uncommon, response of seeking out what is feared:[2] codependents may fall into a subcategory of this group, hiding their fears of attachment in over-dependency.[3]Contents1 Action 2 Language 3 Freud 4 Therapy 5 Cultural examples 6 See also 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksAction[edit] Dare-devil activities are often undertaken in a counterphobic spirit, as a denial of the fears attached to them, which may be only partially successful.[4]
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Anxiety
Anxiety
Anxiety
is an emotion characterized by an unpleasant state of inner turmoil, often accompanied by nervous behavior, such as pacing back and forth, somatic complaints, and rumination.[1] It is the subjectively unpleasant feelings of dread over anticipated events, such as the feeling of imminent death.[2] Anxiety
Anxiety
is not the same as fear, which is a response to a real or perceived immediate threat,[3] whereas anxiety is the expectation of future threat.[3] Anxiety
Anxiety
is a feeling of uneasiness and worry, usually generalized and unfocused as an overreaction to a situation that is only subjectively seen as menacing.[4] It is often accompanied by muscular tension,[3] restlessness, fatigue and problems in concentration
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Wilhelm Fliess
Wilhelm Fliess
Wilhelm Fliess
(German: Wilhelm Fließ; 24 October 1858 – 13 October 1928) was a German Jewish otolaryngologist who practised in Berlin. He developed highly eccentric theories of human biorhythms and a possible nasogenital connection that have not been accepted by modern scientists. He is today best remembered for his close personal friendship and theoretical collaboration with Sigmund Freud, a controversial chapter in the history of psychoanalysis. Contents1 Career 2 Personal life 3 Legacy 4 Bibliography 5 ReferencesCareer[edit] Fliess developed several idiosyncratic theories, such as 'vital periodicity', forerunner of the popular concepts of biorhythms. His work never found scientific favor, though some of his thinking – such as the idea of innate bisexuality– was incorporated into Freud's theories
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Nina Searl
Nina Searl (died 1955) was one of the earliest British child psychoanalysts, who came by way of the Brunswick Square Clinic to become a member of the British Psychoanalytical Society.[1] She was analysed by Hanns Sachs.[2] Among her supervisees was John Bowlby
John Bowlby
while she also helped train D. W
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International Journal Of Psychoanalysis
The International Journal of Psychoanalysis
Psychoanalysis
is an academic journal in the field of psychoanalysis. The idea of the journal was proposed by Ernest Jones
Ernest Jones
in a letter to Sigmund Freud
Sigmund Freud
dated 7 December 1918. The journal itself was established in 1920, with Jones serving as editor until 1939, the year of Freud's death. The International Journal of Psychoanalysis
Psychoanalysis
incorporates the International Review of Psycho-Analysis, founded in 1974 by Joseph Sandler. It is run by the Institute of Psychoanalysis. For the last 95 years the IJP has enjoyed its role as the main international vehicle for communication about psychoanalysis, enjoying a wide international readership from Europe, the Middle East, Africa, Asia-Pacific, North America and Latin America
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Ernst Kris
Ernst Kris (April 26, 1900 – February 27, 1957) was an Austrian psychoanalyst and art historian. Life[edit] Kris was born in 1900 to Leopold Kris, a lawyer, and Rosa Schick in Vienna, Austria-Hungary. Kris not only practiced as a psychoanalyst, he also worked as an art historian and published articles on art history
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Compensation (psychology)
In psychology, compensation is a strategy whereby one covers up, consciously or unconsciously, weaknesses, frustrations, desires, or feelings of inadequacy or incompetence in one life area through the gratification or (drive towards) excellence in another area. Compensation can cover up either real or imagined deficiencies and personal or physical inferiority. Positive compensations may help one to overcome one's difficulties. On the other hand, negative compensations do not, which results in a reinforced feeling of inferiority. There are two kinds of negative compensation:Overcompensation, characterized by a superiority goal, leads to striving for power, dominance, self-esteem, and self-devaluation. Undercompensation, which includes a demand for help, leads to a lack of courage and a fear for life.A well-known example of failing overcompensation, is observed in people going through a midlife-crisis
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Extraversion
The trait of extraversion–introversion is a central dimension of human personality theories. The terms introversion and extraversion were popularized by Carl Jung,[1] although both the popular understanding and psychological usage differ from his original intent. Extraversion tends to be manifested in outgoing, talkative, energetic behavior, whereas introversion is manifested in more reserved and solitary behavior.[2] Virtually all comprehensive models of personality include these concepts in various forms
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Exposure Therapy
Exposure therapy is a technique in behavior therapy thought to help treat anxiety disorders. Exposure therapy involves exposing the target patient to the anxiety source or its context without the intention to cause any danger
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SICK
Sick may refer to:Contents1 Medical conditions 2 Music2.1 Albums 2.2 Songs3 Other media 4 People with the surname 5 As a possessive 6 Other uses 7 See alsoMedical conditions[edit]Having a disease or an illness (physical or mental) or infection Vomiting
Vomiting
(literal or metaphorical)Music[edit] Albums[edit]
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Shyness
Shyness (also called diffidence) is the feeling of apprehension, lack of comfort, or awkwardness especially when a person is around other people. This commonly occurs in new situations or with unfamiliar people. Shyness can be a characteristic of people who have low self-esteem. Stronger forms of shyness are usually referred to as social anxiety or social phobia. The primary defining characteristic of shyness is a largely ego-driven fear of what other people will think of a person's behavior. This results in a person becoming scared of doing or saying what they want to out of fear of negative reactions, being laughed at, humiliated or patronised, criticism or rejection. A shy person may simply opt to avoid social situations instead.[1] One important aspect of shyness is social skills development. Schools and parents may implicitly assume children are fully capable of effective social interaction
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Horror Movies
A horror film is a movie that seeks to elicit a physiological reaction, such as an elevated heartbeat, through the use of fear and shocking one’s audiences. Initially often inspired by literature from authors like Edgar Allan Poe, Bram Stoker
Bram Stoker
and Mary Shelley, horror has existed as a film genre for more than a century. The macabre and the supernatural are frequent themes. Horror may also overlap with the fantasy, supernatural fiction and thriller genres. Horror films often aim to evoke viewers' nightmares, fears, revulsions and terror of the unknown. Plots within the horror genre often involve the intrusion of an evil force, event, or personage into the everyday world
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Phobia
A phobia is a type of anxiety disorder, defined by a persistent fear of an object or situation.[1] The phobia typically results in a rapid onset of fear and is present for more than six months.[1] The affected person will go to great lengths to avoid the situation or object, typically to a degree greater than the actual danger posed.[1] If the feared object or situation cannot be avoided, the affected person will have significant distress.[1] With blood or injury phobia, fainting may occur.[1] Agoraphobia
Agoraphobia
is often associated with panic attacks.
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Psychological Trauma
Psychological trauma is a type of damage to the mind that occurs as a result of a severely distressing event. Trauma is often the result of an overwhelming amount of stress that exceeds one's ability to cope, or integrate the emotions involved with that experience.[1] A traumatic event involves one's experience, or repeating events of being overwhelmed that can be precipitated in weeks, years, or even decades as the person struggles to cope with the immediate circumstances, eventually leading to serious, long-term negative consequences. However, trauma differs between individuals, according to their subjective experiences. People will react to similar events differently
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