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Counterfeit
To counterfeit means to imitate something. Counterfeit
Counterfeit
products are fakes or unauthorized replicas of the real product. Counterfeit products are often produced with the intent to take advantage of the superior value of the imitated product. The word counterfeit frequently describes both the forgeries of currency and documents, as well as the imitations of items such as clothing, handbags, shoes, pharmaceuticals, aviation and automobile parts, watches, electronics (both parts and finished products), software, works of art, toys, and movies.[1] Counterfeit
Counterfeit
products tend to have fake company logos and brands (resulting in patent or trademark infringement in the case of goods), have a reputation for being lower quality (sometimes not working at all) and may even include toxic elements such as lead
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Smartphone
A smartphone is a handheld personal computer with a mobile operating system and an integrated mobile broadband cellular network connection for voice, SMS, and Internet
Internet
data communication; most if not all smartphones also support Wi-Fi. Smartphones are typically pocket-sized, as opposed to tablet computers, which are much larger. They are able to run a variety of software components, known as “apps”. Most basic apps (e.g. event calendar, camera, web browser) come pre-installed with the system, while others are available for download from official sources like the Google Play Store
Google Play Store
or Apple App Store. Apps can receive bug fixes and gain additional functionality through software updates; similarly, operating systems are able to update
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Department Of Homeland Security
The United States
United States
Department of Homeland Security
Department of Homeland Security
(DHS) is a cabinet department of the United States
United States
federal government with responsibilities in public security, roughly comparable to the interior or home ministries of other countries. Its stated missions involve anti-terrorism, border security, immigration and customs, cyber security, and disaster prevention and management.[3] It was created in response to the September 11 attacks
September 11 attacks
and is the youngest U.S
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X-ray Image
Radiography
Radiography
is an imaging technique using X-rays
X-rays
to view the internal form of an object. To create the image, a beam of X-rays, a form of electromagnetic radiation, are produced by an X-ray
X-ray
generator and are projected toward the object. A certain amount of X-ray
X-ray
is absorbed by the object, dependent on its density and structural composition. The X-rays
X-rays
that pass through the object are captured behind the object by a detector (either photographic film or a digital detector). The generation of flat two dimensional images by this technique is called projectional radiography
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Collateral (finance)
In lending agreements, collateral is a borrower's pledge of specific property to a lender, to secure repayment of a loan.[1][2] The collateral serves as a lender's protection against a borrower's default and so can be used to offset the loan if the borrower fails to pay the principal and interest satisfactorily under the terms of the lending agreement. The protection that collateral provides generally allows lenders to offer a lower interest rate on loans that have collateral compared to those without collateral because the risk of loss to the lender is lower. The reduction in interest rate can be up to several percentage points, depending on the type and value of the collateral
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T-shirts
A T-shirt
T-shirt
(or t shirt, or tee) is a style of unisex fabric shirt named after the T shape of its body and sleeves. It normally has short sleeves and a round neckline, known as a crew neck, which lacks a collar. T-shirts are generally made of a light, inexpensive fabric and are easy to clean. Typically made of cotton textile in a stockinette or jersey knit, it has a distinctively pliable texture compared to shirts made of woven cloth. Most modern versions have a body made from a continuously woven tube, produced on a circular loom, such that the torso has no side seams
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Printing
Printing
Printing
is a process for reproducing text and images using a master form or template. The earliest non-paper products involving printing include cylinder seals and objects such as the Cyrus Cylinder
Cyrus Cylinder
and the Cylinders of Nabonidus. The earliest known form of printing as applied to paper was woodblock printing, which appeared in China before 220 A.D.[1] Later developments in printing technology include the movable type invented by Bi Sheng around 1040 AD[2] and the printing press invented by Johannes Gutenberg
Johannes Gutenberg
in the 15th century
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Organisation For Economic Co-operation And Development
The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
(OECD; French: Organisation de coopération et de développement économiques, OCDE) is an intergovernmental economic organisation with 35 member countries, founded in 1961 to stimulate economic progress and world trade. It is a forum of countries describing themselves as committed to democracy and the market economy, providing a platform to compare policy experiences, seeking answers to common problems, identify good practices and coordinate domestic and international policies of its members. Most OECD
OECD
members are high-income economies with a very high Human Development Index
Human Development Index
(HDI) and are regarded as developed countries
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Sharpie (marker)
Sharpie is a brand of writing instruments (mainly permanent marker pens) manufactured by Newell Brands, a public company, headquartered in Hoboken, NJ. Originally designating a single permanent marker, the Sharpie brand has been widely expanded and can now be found on a variety of previously unrelated permanent and non-permanent pens and markers formerly marketed under other brands. Sharpie markers are made with a number of tips. The most common and popular is the Fine tip. Other tips include Ultra Fine Point, Extra Fine Point, Brush tip, Chisel tip, and Retractable tip.Contents1 History 2 Marketing 3 Removal and safety 4 Popular culture 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] "Sharpie" was originally a name designating a permanent marker launched in 1964 by the Sanford Ink Company
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LG
LG Corporation
LG Corporation
(Korean: 주식회사 LG), formerly Lucky-GoldStar (Korean: Leogki Geumseong
Geumseong
(럭키금성/樂喜金星), is a South Korean multinational conglomerate corporation. It is the fourth-largest chaebol in South Korea
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Patent Infringement
Patent
Patent
infringement is the commission of a prohibited act with respect to a patented invention without permission from the patent holder. Permission may typically be granted in the form of a license. The definition of patent infringement may vary by jurisdiction, but it typically includes using or selling the patented invention. In many countries, a use is required to be commercial (or to have a commercial purpose) to constitute patent infringement.[citation needed] The scope of the patented invention or the extent of protection[1] is defined in the claims of the granted patent. In other words, the terms of the claims inform the public of what is not allowed without the permission of the patent holder. Patents are territorial, and infringement is only possible in a country where a patent is in force
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Globalisation
Globalization
Globalization
or globalisation is the trend of increasing interaction between people on a worldwide scale due to advances in transportation and communication technology, nominally beginning with the steamship and the telegraph in the early to mid-1800s. With increased interactions between nation-states and individuals came the growth of international trade, ideas, and culture
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Final Good
In economics, any commodity which is produced and subsequently consumed by the consumer, to satisfy his current wants or needs, is a consumer good or final good. Consumer
Consumer
goods are goods that are ultimately consumed rather than used in the production of another good. For example, a microwave oven or a bicycle which is sold to a consumer is a final good or consumer good, whereas the components which are sold to be used in those goods are called intermediate goods. For example, textiles or transistors which can be used to make some further goods. When used in measures of national income and output, the term "final goods" only includes new goods. For instance, the GDP excludes items counted in an earlier year to prevent double counting of production based on resales of the same item second and third hand
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Sun Records
Sun Records
Sun Records
is an American independent record label founded by Sam Phillips in Memphis, Tennessee
Memphis, Tennessee
in 1952.[1] Sun was the first company to record Elvis Presley, Roy Orbison, Jerry Lee Lewis, and Johnny Cash.Contents1 History 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] Sam Phillips
Sam Phillips
discovered and first recorded such influential musicians as Elvis Presley, Carl Perkins, Roy Orbison, Jerry Lee Lewis
Jerry Lee Lewis
and Johnny Cash. Presley's recording contract was eventually sold to RCA Victor Records for $35,000 in 1955 to relieve Sun's financial difficulties. Before those records, Sun had concentrated mainly on African-American musicians because Phillips loved rhythm and blues and wanted to bring it to a white audience
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RCA Victor
RCA
RCA
Records is an American record label owned by Sony
Sony
Music, a subsidiary of Sony
Sony
Corporation of America. It is one of Sony
Sony
Music Entertainment's three flagship record labels, alongside Columbia Records and Epic Records. The label has released multiple genres of music, including pop, rock, hip hop, electronic, R&B, blues, jazz, and country. The company's name is derived from the initials of the label's defunct parent company, the Radio Corporation of America[1] (RCA). It is the second oldest recording company in US history, after sister label Columbia Records. RCA's Canadian
Canadian
unit (formerly Berliner Gramophone Canada, then RCA
RCA
Victor Company Ltd. Canada), is Sony's oldest label in Canada
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The Beatles
The Beatles
The Beatles
were an English rock band formed in Liverpool
Liverpool
in 1960. With members John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison
George Harrison
and Ringo Starr, they became widely regarded as the foremost and most influential music band.[1] Rooted in skiffle, beat and 1950s rock and roll, the Beatles later experimented with several musical styles, ranging from pop ballads and Indian music to psychedelia and hard rock, often incorporating classical elements and unconventional recording techniques in innovative ways
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