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Count Of Alençon
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Alençon
Alençon
(French pronunciation: [a.lɑ̃.sɔ̃] ( listen)) is a commune in Normandy, France, capital of the Orne
Orne
department. It is situated 173 kilometres (107 mi) west of Paris
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Prefectures Of France
A prefecture (French: préfecture) in France
France
may refer to:the Chef-lieu de département, the town in which the administration of a department is located; the Chef-lieu de région, the town in which the administration of a region is located; the jurisdiction of a prefecture; the official residence or headquarters of a prefect.Contents1 Role of the prefecture 2 Paris 3 Divisions of departments 4 See alsoRole of the prefecture[edit] There are 101 prefectures in France, one for each department. The official in charge is the prefect (French: préfet)
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Precipitation
In meteorology, precipitation is any product of the condensation of atmospheric water vapor that falls under gravity.[2] The main forms of precipitation include drizzle, rain, sleet, snow, graupel and hail. Precipitation
Precipitation
occurs when a portion of the atmosphere becomes saturated with water vapor, so that the water condenses and "precipitates". Thus, fog and mist are not precipitation but suspensions, because the water vapor does not condense sufficiently to precipitate. Two processes, possibly acting together, can lead to air becoming saturated: cooling the air or adding water vapor to the air. Precipitation
Precipitation
forms as smaller droplets coalesce via collision with other rain drops or ice crystals within a cloud
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William Of Poitiers
William of Poitiers (c. 1020 – 1090) was a Frankish priest of Norman origin and chaplain of Duke William of Normandy (William the Conqueror) (Guillaume le Conquerant), for whom he chronicled the Norman Conquest of England
Norman Conquest of England
in his Gesta VVillelmi ducis Normannorum et regis Anglorum ("The Deeds of William, Duke of Normandy
Duke of Normandy
and King of England") or Gesta Guillelmi II ducis Normannorum
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Duchy
A duchy is a country, territory, fief, or domain ruled by a duke or duchess. The term is used almost exclusively in Europe, where in the present day there is no sovereign duchy (i.e. with the status of a nation state) left. The term "duke" (like the corresponding "duchy") should not be confused with the title Grand Duke
Duke
(or Grand Duchy, such as the present-day Grand Duchy
Grand Duchy
of Luxembourg), as there exists a significant difference of rank between the two. In common European cultural heritage, a grand duke is the third highest monarchic rank, after emperor and king. Its synonym in many Slavic and Baltic European languages (Russian, Lithuanian, etc.) is translated as Grand Prince, whereas most Germanic and Romance European languages (English, French, Spanish, Italian etc.) use expressions corresponding to Grand Duke.[1] Unlike a duke, the sovereign grand duke is considered royalty (or in German, 'royal nobility', Königsadel)
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French Revolution
The French Revolution
Revolution
(French: Révolution française [ʁevɔlysjɔ̃ fʁɑ̃sɛːz]) was a period of far-reaching social and political upheaval in France
France
and its colonies that lasted from 1789 until 1799. It was partially carried forward by Napoleon
Napoleon
during the later expansion of the French Empire. The Revolution
Revolution
overthrew the monarchy, established a republic, catalyzed violent periods of political turmoil, and finally culminated in a dictatorship under Napoleon
Napoleon
who brought many of its principles to areas he conquered in Western Europe and beyond
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Duke Of Alençon
Several counts and then royal dukes of Alençon
Alençon
have figured in French history
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Alençon Lace
Alençon
Alençon
lace or point d' Alençon
Alençon
is a needle lace that originated in Alençon, France. It is sometimes called the "Queen of lace." Lace making began in Alençon
Alençon
during the 16th century and the local industry was rapidly expanded during the reign of Louis XIV by Jean-Baptiste Colbert, who established a Royal Workshop in the town to produce lace in the Venetian style in 1665. The purpose of establishing this workshop was to reduce the French court's dependence on expensive foreign imports. The local lacemakers soon modified the Venetian technique and Alençon
Alençon
emerged as a unique style around 1675.Contents1 History 2 See also 3 Bibliography 4 Notes 5 External linksHistory[edit] Though the demand for lace went into sharp decline following the French Revolution, it recovered some of its popularity during the Second French Empire
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Printing
Printing
Printing
is a process for reproducing text and images using a master form or template. The earliest non-paper products involving printing include cylinder seals and objects such as the Cyrus Cylinder
Cyrus Cylinder
and the Cylinders of Nabonidus. The earliest known form of printing as applied to paper was woodblock printing, which appeared in China before 220 A.D.[1] Later developments in printing technology include the movable type invented by Bi Sheng around 1040 AD[2] and the printing press invented by Johannes Gutenberg
Johannes Gutenberg
in the 15th century
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Thérèse Of Lisieux
Saint
Saint
Thérèse of Lisieux
Lisieux
(French: Sainte-Thérèse de Lisieux), born Marie Françoise-Thérèse Martin (2 January 1873 – 30 September 1897), also known as Saint
Saint
Thérèse of the Child Jesus
Child Jesus
and the Holy Face, O.C.D., was a French Catholic Discalced Carmelite
Discalced Carmelite
nun who is widely venerated in modern times. She is popularly known as "The Little Flower of Jesus" or simply "The Little Flower". Thérèse has been a highly influential model of sanctity for Catholics and for others because of the "simplicity and practicality of her approach to the spiritual life"
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Wehrmacht
The Wehrmacht (German pronunciation: [ˈveːɐ̯maxt] ( listen), lit. "defence force")[N 2] were the unified armed forces of Nazi Germany
Nazi Germany
from 1935 to 1946. It consisted of the Heer (army), the Kriegsmarine
Kriegsmarine
(navy) and the Luftwaffe
Luftwaffe
(air force).[4] The designation Wehrmacht
Wehrmacht
replaced the previously used term Reichswehr, and was the manifestation of Nazi Germany's efforts to rearm the nation to a greater extent than the Treaty of Versailles
Treaty of Versailles
permitted.[5] After the Nazi seizure of power
Nazi seizure of power
in 1933, one of Adolf Hitler's most overt and audacious moves was to establish the Wehrmacht, a modern armed force fully capable of offensive use
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French Army
The French Army, officially the Ground Army
Army
(French: Armée de terre [aʀme də tɛʀ]) (to distinguish it from the French Air Force, Armée de L'air or Air Army) is the land-based and largest component of the French Armed Forces. It is responsible to the Government of France, along with the other four components of the Armed Forces. The current Chief of Staff of the French Army
Chief of Staff of the French Army
(CEMAT) is General Jean-Pierre Bosser, a direct subordinate of the Chief of the Defence Staff (CEMA). General Bosser is also responsible, in part, to the Ministry of the Armed Forces for organization, preparation, use of forces, as well as planning and programming, equipment and Army
Army
future acquisitions
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Philippe De Hauteclocque
Philippe François Marie Leclerc de Hauteclocque (French pronunciation: ​[filip ləklɛʁ də otklɔk]; 22 November 1902 – 28 November 1947) was a French general during the Second World War. He became Marshal of France posthumously in 1952, and is known in France simply as le maréchal Leclerc or just Leclerc. The son of an aristocratic family, de Hauteclocque graduated from the École spéciale militaire de Saint-Cyr, the French military academy, in 1924. After service with the French Occupation of the Ruhr and in Morocco, he returned to Saint-Cyr as an instructor. He was awarded the croix de guerre des théâtres d'opérations extérieures for leading goumiers in an attack on caves and ravines on Bou Amdoun on 11 August 1933
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Relative Humidity
Relative humidity
Relative humidity
(RH) is the ratio of the partial pressure of water vapor to the equilibrium vapor pressure of water at a given temperature. Relative humidity
Relative humidity
depends on temperature and the pressure of the system of interest
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Geoffrey II, Count Of Anjou
Geoffrey II, called Martel ("the Hammer"), was Count of Anjou
Count of Anjou
from 1040 to 1060. He was the son of Fulk the Black. He was bellicose and fought against William VII, Duke of Aquitaine, Theobald I, Count of Blois, and William, Duke of Normandy. During his twenty-year reign he especially had to face the ambitions of the Bishop of Le Mans, Gervais de Château-du-Loir, but he was able to maintain his authority over the County of Maine. Even before the death of his father in 1040, he had extended his power up to the Saintonge, where he founded the Abbey aux Dames. The first mention of Geoffrey in the Gesta Normannorum Ducum reads: "Geoffrey, count of the Angevins, nicknamed Martel, a treacherous man in every respect, frequently inflicted assaults and intolerable pressure on his neighbors."[1] "In alliance with King Henry I of France, Count Geoffrey laid siege to Tours
Tours
in the winter of 1042–3
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Sunshine Duration
Sunshine
Sunshine
duration or sunshine hours is a climatological indicator, measuring duration of sunshine in given period (usually, a day or a year) for a given location on Earth, typically expressed as an averaged value over several years. It is a general indicator of cloudiness of a location, and thus differs from insolation, which measures the total energy delivered by sunlight over a given period. Sunshine
Sunshine
duration is usually expressed in hours per year, or in (average) hours per day. The first measure indicates the general sunniness of a location compared with other places, while the latter allows for comparison of sunshine in various seasons in the same location.[1] Another often-used measure is percentage ratio of recorded bright sunshine duration and daylight duration in the observed period. An important use of sunshine duration data is to characterize the climate of sites, especially of health resorts
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