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Council Of Frankfurt
The Council of Frankfurt, traditionally also the Council of Frankfort,[2][3] in 794 was called by Charlemagne, as a meeting of the important churchmen of the Frankish realm. Bishops and priests from Francia, Aquitaine, Italy, and Provence
Provence
gathered in Franconofurd (now known as Frankfurt am Main). The synod, held in June 794, allowed the discussion and resolution of many central religious and political questions. The chief concerns of the council were the Frankish response to the Adoptionist
Adoptionist
movement in Spain and the Second Council of Nicaea
Second Council of Nicaea
(787), which had been held by the Byzantine Empress Irene of Athens
Irene of Athens
and had dealt with iconoclasm and with which Charlemagne
Charlemagne
took issue because no Frankish churchmen had been invited
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Paulinus Of Aquileia
Saint Paulinus II (c. 726 – 11 January 802 or 804 AD) was a priest, theologian, poet, and one of the most eminent scholars of the Carolingian Renaissance.[1] From 787 to his death, he was the Patriarch of Aquileia. He participated in a number of synods which opposed Spanish Adoptionism and promoted both reforms and the adoption of the Filioque into the Nicene Creed. In addition, Paulinus arranged for the peaceful Christianisation of the Avars and the alpine Slavs in the territory of the Aquileian patriarchate. For this, he is also known as the apostle of the Slovenes. Contents1 Life1.1 Early life 1.2 Carolingian Renaissance 1.3 Patriarch of Aquileia2 Synods 3 Missus dominicus 4 Works 5 Veneration5.1 Feast day6 ReferencesLife[edit] Early life[edit] Paulinus was born at Premariacco, near Cividale (the Roman Forum Iulii) in the Friuli region of north-eastern Italy, probably of a Roman family, during the latter days of Lombard rule
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Council Of Chalcedon
The Council of Chalcedon
Chalcedon
(/kælˈsiːdən, ˈkælsɪdɒn/)[1] was a church council held from October 8 to November 1, AD 451, at Chalcedon. The council is numbered as the fourth ecumenical council by the Catholic Church, the Eastern Orthodox Church, and most Protestants
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Languedoc
Languedoc (/ˈlɒŋɡədɒk/; French: [lɑ̃ɡ(ə)dɔk]; Occitan: Lengadòc [leŋɡɔˈðɔ(k)]) is a former province of France. Its territory is now contained in the modern-day region of Occitanie in the south of France. Its capital city was Toulouse. It had an area of approximately 27,376 square kilometers (10,570 square miles).Contents1 Geographical extent 2 Area and location of Languedoc 3 Old administrative divisions 4 Capital 5 Modern administrative divisions 6 Population and cities 7 Economy7.1 Agriculture 7.2 Industry 7.3 Services and tourism8 Sports 9 Property 10 See also 11 Notes 12 External linksGeographical extent[edit]The gouvernement of Languedoc (including Gévaudan, Velay, and Vivarais) among the former gouvernements of France.The traditional provinces of the kingdom of France were not formally defined. A province was simply a territory of common traditions and customs, but it had no political organization
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Pope Hadrian I
Pope
Pope
Adrian I (Latin: Hadrianus I d. 25 December 795) was Pope
Pope
from 1 February 772 to his death in 795.[1] He was the son of Theodore, a Roman nobleman. Adrian and his predecessors had to contend with periodic attempts by the Lombards
Lombards
to expand their holdings in Italy at the expense of the papacy. Not receiving any support from Constantinople, the popes looked for help to the Franks. Adrian's tenure saw the culmination of on-going territorial disputes between Charlemagne
Charlemagne
and his brother Carloman. The Lombard king Desiderius
Desiderius
supported the claims of Carloman's sons to their late father's land, and requested Pope
Pope
Adrian crown Carloman's sons "Kings of the Frank"
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Émile Amann
Émile Amann (4 June 1880, Pont-à-Mousson – 11 January 1948, Strasbourg) was a French historian of the Church. After studying at the major seminary of Nancy, Émile Amann continued his training at the Catholic Institute in Paris. He was mobilized in 1914 and fought during the four years of First World War. After his demobilization, he joined the faculty of Catholic theology of the University of Strasbourg (re-founded after the return to France of the three departments annexed in 1870), where he taught the ancient history of the Church until his death. He is notable for his collaboration with the Dictionnaire de théologie catholique, from 1922 to his death. Works[edit]1910: Le Protévangile de Jacques et ses remaniements latins 1903: Les actes de Paul et ses épîtres apocryphes 1902: Les actes de Pierre 1920: Le Dogme catholique dans les Pères de l’Église 1928: L’Église des premiers siècles 1938: L'époque carolingienne 1940: L’Église au pouvoir
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Christology
Christology
Christology
(from Greek Χριστός Khristós and -λογία, -logia) is the field of study within Christian theology
Christian theology
which is primarily concerned with the ontology and person of Jesus
Jesus
as recorded in the canonical Gospels and the epistles of the New Testament.[2][3][4] Primary considerations include the ontology and person of Jesus
Jesus
in conjunction with His relationship with that of God the Father. As such, Christology
Christology
is concerned with the details of Jesus' ministry, his acts and teachings, to arrive at a clearer understanding of who he is in his person, and his role in salvation.[5] The views of Paul the Apostle
Paul the Apostle
provided a major component of the Christology
Christology
of the Apostolic Age
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Elipando
Elipando (717 - 808?) named Elipandus in some sources was a Spanish archbishop of Toledo and theologian. He was one of the founders of the Adoptivi sect. Although he affirmed Catholic teaching that Jesus
Jesus
is true Son of God, eternally begotten from God
God
the Father and thus of one divine nature with the Father, he also proposed that Jesus, as the son of David, according to his human nature was the adopted rather than the natural son of God. Elipando's assertion seemed to suggest that Christ's human nature existed separately from His divine personhood. Thus, it seemed to be a nuanced form of Nestorianism
Nestorianism
and came to be known as Adoptionism
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Roman Catholic Archdiocese Of Toledo
The word diocese (/ˈdaɪəsɪs, -siːs, -siːz/)[a] is derived from the Greek term διοίκησις meaning "administration". When now used in an ecclesiastical sense, it refers to an administrative territorial entity.[2] In the Western Church, the district is under the supervision of a bishop (who may have assistant bishops to help him or her) and is divided into parishes under the care of priests; but in the Eastern Church, the word denotes the area under the jurisdiction of a patriarch and the bishops under his jurisdiction administer parishes.[2] This structure of church governance is known as episcopal polity. The word diocesan means relating or pertaining to a diocese. It can also be used as a noun meaning the bishop who has the principal supervision of a diocese
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Primate Of Spain
The Primacy of the Archdiocese of Toledo
Archdiocese of Toledo
is the primacy of the Diocese (later Archdiocese) of Toledo over the other episcopal sees in the Roman Catholic Church
Roman Catholic Church
in Spain. Now a purely honorary title, it was of major importance in the medieval and early modern era, with the see having a reputation of being the second richest after Rome. It later had a symbolic dimension and was still in use under Francoism. He is often raised to the rank of cardinal by the pope, making him Cardinal Primate. The Primacy of Toledo means that the Archbishop of Toledo
Archbishop of Toledo
is also known as Primate of Spain. This, must not be confused with the title of Primate of Hispânia (or the Spains) which belongs to the Arcebishop of Braga
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Bishop Of Urgell
The Diocese of Urgell is a Roman Catholic diocese in Spain and Andorra in the historical County of Urgell,[1][2] with origins in the fifth century AD or possibly earlier. It is based in the region of the historical Catalan County of Urgell, though it has different borders. The seat and Cathedral of the bishop are situated in la Seu d'Urgell town. The state of Andorra is a part of this diocese. Among its most notable events are Bishop Felix's adoptionist revolt, the coup of Bishop Esclua and the overthrowing of the bishop by members of aristocratic families (namely Salla i Ermengol del Conflent, Eribau i Folcs dels Cardona, Guillem Guifré de Cerdanya and Ot de Pallars) between the years 981 and 1122. Also important is the diocese's patronage of Andorra, with the bishop holding the role of ex officio Co-Prince of the Pyrenean Catalan-speaking nation jointly with the President of the French Republic (and formerly, the King of France)
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Heresy
Heresy
Heresy
(/ˈhɛrəsi/) is any belief or theory that is strongly at variance with established beliefs or customs, in particular the accepted beliefs of a church or religious organization
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Consubstantiality
Consubstantial (Latin: consubstantialis) is an adjective used in Latin Christian
Christian
christology, coined by Tertullian
Tertullian
in Against Hermogenes 44, used to translate the Greek term homoousios. "Consubstantial" describes the relationship among the Divine persons of the Christian Trinity
Trinity
and connotes that God
God
the Father, God
God
the Son, and God
God
the Holy Ghost
Holy Ghost
are "of one substance" in that the Son is "begotten" "before all ages" or "eternally" of the Father's own being, from which the Spirit also eternally "proceeds"
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Charlemagne
Charlemagne
Charlemagne
(/ˈʃɑːrləmeɪn/) or Charles
Charles
the Great[a] (2 April 742[1][b] – 28 January 814), numbered Charles
Charles
I, was King of the Franks
Franks
from 768, King of the Lombards
Lombards
from 774 and Holy Roman Emperor from 800. He united much of western and central Europe during the early Middle Ages. He was the first recognised emperor to rule from western Europe since the fall of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
three centuries earlier.[2] The expanded Frankish state that Charlemagne founded is called the Carolingian
Carolingian
Empire
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Patristics
Patristics or patrology is the study of the early Christian writers who are designated Church Fathers. The names derive from the combined forms of Latin pater and Greek patḗr (father). The period is generally considered to run from the end of New Testament
New Testament
times or end of the Apostolic Age
Apostolic Age
(c. AD 100) to either AD 451 (the date of the Council of Chalcedon)[1] or to the 8th-century Second Council of Nicaea.Contents1 Key persons 2 Key theological developments 3 Eras of the church fathers 4 Locations 5 Obstacles to 21st-century understanding 6 Patrologia vs
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Nicene Creed
The Nicene Creed
Creed
(Greek: Σύμβολον τῆς Νικαίας or, τῆς πίστεως, Latin: Symbolum Nicaenum) is a statement of belief widely used in Christian liturgy. It is called Nicene /ˈnaɪsiːn/ because it was originally adopted in the city of Nicaea (present day İznik, Turkey) by the First Council of Nicaea
First Council of Nicaea
in 325.[1] In 381, it was amended at the First Council of Constantinople, and the amended form is referred to as the Nicene or the Niceno-Constantinopolitan Creed. The Oriental Orthodox and Assyrian churches use this profession of faith with the verbs in the original plural ("we believe") form, but the Eastern Orthodox and Catholic churches convert those verbs to the singular ("I believe")
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