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Council–manager Government
The council–manager government form is one of two predominant forms of local government in the United States
United States
and Ireland, the other being the mayor–council government form.[1] Council–manager government form also is used in county governments in the United States
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Scientific Management
Scientific management
Scientific management
is a theory of management that analyzes and synthesizes workflows. Its main objective is improving economic efficiency, especially labour productivity. It was one of the earliest attempts to apply science to the engineering of processes and to management. Scientific management
Scientific management
is sometimes known as Taylorism after its founder, Frederick Winslow Taylor.[1] Taylor began the theory's development in the United States
United States
during the 1880s and '90s within manufacturing industries, especially steel
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National Civic League
The National Civic League
National Civic League
is an American non-profit organization with a mission to advance civic engagement to create equitable, thriving communities. It was founded as the National Municipal League in 1894 at the National Conference for Good City
City
Government in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.[1] The convention of politicians, policy-makers, journalists, and educators (including Theodore Roosevelt, Louis Brandeis, Marshall Field, and Frederick Law Olmsted) met to discuss the future of American cities. It also promotes professional management of local government through publication of "model charters" for both city and county governments. The National Civic League
National Civic League
applies civic engagement principles through key programs: Community Assistance, Research and Publications, and Awards and Events
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Frederick Winslow Taylor
Frederick Winslow Taylor
Frederick Winslow Taylor
(March 20, 1856 – March 21, 1915) was an American mechanical engineer who sought to improve industrial efficiency.[2] He was one of the first management consultants.[3] Taylor was one of the intellectual leaders of the Efficiency Movement and his ideas, broadly conceived, were highly influential in the Progressive Era
Progressive Era
(1890s-1920s)
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Sumter, South Carolina
Sumter /ˈsʌmtər/ is a city in and the county seat of Sumter County, South Carolina, United States.[3] Known as the Sumter Metropolitan Statistical Area, the namesake county adjoins Clarendon and Lee to form the core of Sumter-Lee-Clarendon tri-county area of South Carolina, an area that includes the three counties in the east central Piedmont
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Staunton, Virginia
Staunton (/ˈstæntən/ STAN-tən) is an independent city in the U.S. Commonwealth of Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 23,746.[3] In Virginia, independent cities are separate jurisdictions from the counties that surround them, so the government offices of Augusta County
County
are in Verona, which is contiguous to Staunton.[4] Staunton is a principal city of the Staunton-Waynesboro Metropolitan Statistical Area, which had a 2010 population of 118,502. Staunton is known for being the birthplace of Woodrow Wilson, the 28th U.S. president, and the home of Mary Baldwin University, historically a women's college
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Dayton, Ohio
Dayton (/ˈdeɪtən/) is the sixth-largest city in the state of Ohio and the county seat of Montgomery County.[5] A small part of the city extends into Greene County.[6] In the 2010 census, the population was 141,759, and the Dayton metropolitan area
Dayton metropolitan area
had 799,232 residents, making it Ohio's fourth-largest metropolitan area, after Cleveland, Cincinnati, and Columbus, and the 63rd-largest in the United States.[7] The Dayton-Springfield-Greenville Combined Statistical Area had a population of 1,080,044 in 2010, making it the 43rd-largest in the United States.[8] Dayton is within Ohio's
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Richmond, Virginia
Richmond (/ˈrɪtʃmənd/ RICH-mənd) is the capital of the Commonwealth of Virginia
Virginia
in the United States. It is the center of the Richmond Metropolitan Statistical Area
Metropolitan Statistical Area
(MSA) and the Greater Richmond Region. It was incorporated in 1742, and has been an independent city since 1871. As of the 2010 census, the population was 204,214;[6] in 2016, the population was estimated to be 223,170,[6] the fourth-most populous city in Virginia
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Jered Carr
Jered Byron Carr is a political scientist, professor of urban policy and a former Policy analyst for the Florida State Legislature in the Office of Program Policy Analysis and Government Accountability. He was formerly the Director of the L.P. Cookingham Institute of Urban Affairs and Professor of Henry W. Bloch School of Management at University of Missouri-Kansas City and was a former researcher at Center for International Public Management. Presently, he is Co-Editor and Managing Editor of the Urban Affairs Review and Head of the Department in Public Administration at University of Illinois at Chicago.[1][2]Contents1 Background1.1 Selected bibliography2 Sources 3 External linksBackground[edit] Carr earned his Ph.D
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World War I
Allied victoryCentral Powers' victory on the Eastern Front nullified by defeat on the Western Front Fall of the German, Russian, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian empires Russian Civil War
Russian Civil War
and foundation of the Soviet Union Formation of new countries in Europe
Europe
and the Middle East Transfer of German colonies
German colonies
and regions of the former Ottoman Empire to other powers Establishment of the League of Nations
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Phoenix, Arizona
Phoenix (/ˈfiːnɪks/) is the capital and most populous city of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Arizona. With 1,615,017 people (as of 2016[update]), Phoenix is the fifth most populous city nationwide, the most populous state capital in the United States, and the only state capital with a population of more than one million residents.[5][6] Phoenix is the anchor of the Phoenix metropolitan area, also known as the Valley of the Sun, which in turn is a part of the Salt River Valley
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Council Manager (Republic Of Ireland)
A council is a group of people who come together to consult, deliberate, or make decisions. A council may function as a legislature, especially at a town, city or county level, but most legislative bodies at the state or national level are not considered councils. At such levels, there may be no separate executive branch, and the council may effectively represent the entire government. A board of directors might also be denoted as a council. A committee might also be denoted as a council, though a committee is generally a subordinate body composed of members of a larger body, while a council may not be
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Spoils System
In politics and government, a spoils system (also known as a patronage system) is a practice in which a political party, after winning an election, gives government civil service jobs to its supporters, friends and relatives as a reward for working toward victory, and as an incentive to keep working for the party—as opposed to a merit system, where offices are awarded on the basis of some measure of merit, independent of political activity. The term was used particularly in politics of the United States, where the federal government operated on a spoils system until the Pendleton Act was passed in 1883 due to a civil service reform movement. Thereafter the spoils system was largely replaced by a nonpartisan merit at the federal level of the United States. The term was derived from the phrase "to the victor belongs the spoils" by New York Senator William L
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1916 Rising
The Easter Rising
Easter Rising
(Irish: Éirí Amach na Cásca),[2] also known as the Easter Rebellion, was an armed insurrection in Ireland
Ireland
during Easter Week, April 1916. The Rising was launched by Irish republicans to end British rule in Ireland
Ireland
and establish an independent Irish Republic while the United Kingdom was heavily engaged in the First World War. It was the most significant uprising in Ireland
Ireland
since the rebellion of 1798, and the first armed action of the Irish revolutionary period. Organised by a seven-man Military Council of the Irish Republican Brotherhood,[3] the Rising began on Easter Monday, 24 April 1916, and lasted for six days
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Irish War Of Independence
The Irish War of Independence
Irish War of Independence
(Irish: Cogadh na Saoirse)[4] or Anglo-Irish War was a guerrilla war fought from 1919 to 1921 between the Irish Republican Army
Irish Republican Army
(IRA, the army of the Irish Republic) and the British security forces in Ireland. It was an escalation of the Irish revolutionary period
Irish revolutionary period
into warfare. In April 1916, Irish republicans launched an armed uprising against British rule and proclaimed an Irish Republic. Although it was crushed after a week of fighting, the rising and the British response led to greater popular support for Irish independence. In the December 1918 election, the republican party Sinn Féin
Sinn Féin
won a landslide victory in Ireland. On 21 January 1919 they formed a breakaway government (Dáil Éireann) and declared independence from Britain
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Irish Civil War
Pro-Treaty victoryConfirmation of Irish Free State Defeat of Anti-Treaty forcesBelligerents Pro-Treaty forces:National Army CID (including Citizens' Defence Force)Military support  United Kingdom Anti-Treaty forces: Irish Republican Army
Irish Republican Army
(officially termed the Irregulars[1] in a term made compulsory for newspapers by the Director of Communications of the Free State, Piaras Béaslaí) Cumann na mBan Fianna ÉireannCommanders and leadersMilitary commanders: Michael Collins (until August 1922)  † Richard Mulcahy Political leaders: W. T
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