HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Cotswolds
The Cotswolds
Cotswolds
(/ˈkɒtswoʊldz/ KOTS-wohldz, /-wəldz/ -wəldz[1]) is an area in south central England
England
containing the Cotswold Hills, a range of rolling hills which rise from the meadows of the upper Thames to an escarpment, known as the Cotswold Edge, above the Severn Valley and Evesham
Evesham
Vale. The area is defined by the bedrock of Jurassic limestone that creates a type of grassland habitat rare in the UK and that is quarried for the golden coloured Cotswold stone.[2] It contains unique features derived from the use of this mineral; the predominantly rural landscape contains stone-built villages, historical towns and stately homes and gardens
[...More...]

"Cotswolds" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pasque Flower
See textThe genus Pulsatilla
Pulsatilla
contains about 33 species of herbaceous perennials native to meadows and prairies of North America, Europe, and Asia. Common names include pasque flower (or pasqueflower), wind flower, prairie crocus, Easter
Easter
flower, and meadow anemone. Several species are valued ornamentals because of their finely-dissected leaves, solitary bell-shaped flowers, and plumed seed heads. The showy part of the flower consists of sepals, not petals. The genus Pulsatilla
Pulsatilla
is sometimes considered a subgenus under the genus Anemone
Anemone
or as an informally named "group" within Anemone subgenus Anemone
Anemone
section Pulsatilloides.[1] The flower blooms early in spring, which leads to the common name Pasque flower, since Pasque refers to Easter
Easter
(Passover)
[...More...]

"Pasque Flower" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Oolite
Oolite
Oolite
or oölite (egg stone) is a sedimentary rock formed from ooids, spherical grains composed of concentric layers. The name derives from the Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
word ᾠόν for egg. Strictly, oolites consist of ooids of 0.25–2 millimetres' diameter; rocks composed of ooids larger than 2 mm are called pisolites. The term oolith can refer to oolite or individual ooids.Contents1 Composition 2 Occurrence 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksComposition[edit] Ooids
Ooids
are most commonly composed of calcium carbonate (calcite or aragonite), but can be composed of phosphate, clays, chert, dolomite or iron minerals, including hematite. Dolomitic and chert ooids are most likely the result of the replacement of the original texture in limestone
[...More...]

"Oolite" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Bedrock
In geology, bedrock is the lithified rock that lies under a loose softer material called regolith at the surface of the Earth or other terrestrial planets. The broken and weathered regolith includes soil and subsoil. The surface of the bedrock beneath the soil cover is known as rockhead in engineering geology,[1][2] and its identification by digging, drilling or geophysical methods is an important task in most civil engineering projects
[...More...]

"Bedrock" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

English Place-Name Society
The English Place-Name Society (EPNS) is a learned society concerned with toponomastics and the toponymy of England, in other words, the study of place-names (toponyms). Its scholars aim to explain the origin and history of the names they study, taking into account factors such as the meaning of the elements out of which they were created (which can be in languages such as Old English, or early Welsh, Danish, Norwegian or Cornish etc.); the topography, geology and ecology of the places bearing the names; and the general and local history and culture of England.Contents1 History 2 Publications 3 Notes 4 Bibliography 5 See also 6 External linksHistory[edit] In 1922 Professor Allen Mawer read a paper to the British Academy about setting up an English place-name survey. He obtained the formal and financial support of the Academy
[...More...]

"English Place-Name Society" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Cotswold Hills, Queensland
Cotswold Hills is a suburb of Toowoomba, Queensland, Australia, located 8 kilometres (5 mi) north-west of the city centre off Warrego Highway. It is a rural-residential area with homes on small acreages.[2] References[edit]^ Australian Bureau of Statistics (25 October 2007). "Cotswold Hills (Jondaryan Shire) (State Suburb)". 2006 Census QuickStats. Retrieved 4 June 2011.  ^ Brisway Publishing (2008). Brisway: Greater Brisbane, Sunshine Coast, Gold Coast and Toowoomba
[...More...]

"Cotswold Hills, Queensland" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Treecreeper
Certhia SalpornisThe treecreepers are a family, Certhiidae, of small passerine birds, widespread in wooded regions of the Northern Hemisphere
Northern Hemisphere
and sub-Saharan Africa. The family contains ten species in two genera, Certhia
Certhia
and Salpornis. Their plumage is dull-coloured, and as their name implies, they climb over the surface of trees in search of food.Contents1 Taxonomy and systematics1.1 Species in taxonomic order2 Description 3 Distribution and habitat 4 Behaviour and ecology 5 References 6 External linksTaxonomy and systematics[edit] The family consists of two subfamilies, each with one genus
[...More...]

"Treecreeper" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Grey Wagtail
Motacilla
Motacilla
melanope Calobates melanopeThe grey wagtail ( Motacilla
Motacilla
cinerea) is a member of the wagtail family, Motacillidae, measuring around 18–19 cm overall length. The species looks somewhat similar to the yellow wagtail but has the yellow on its underside restricted to the throat and vent. Breeding males have a black throat. The species is widely distributed, with several populations breeding in Europe and Asia and migrating to tropical regions in Asia and Africa. The species is always associated with running water when breeding, although they may use man-made structures near streams for the nest
[...More...]

"Grey Wagtail" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

European Goldfinch
The European goldfinch
European goldfinch
or goldfinch ( Carduelis
Carduelis
carduelis), is a small passerine bird in the finch family that is native to Europe, North Africa and western Asia. It has been introduced to other areas including Australia, New Zealand
New Zealand
and Uruguay. The goldfinch has a red face and a black-and-white head. The back and flanks are buff or chestnut brown. The black wings have a broad yellow bar. The tail is black and the rump is white
[...More...]

"European Goldfinch" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Badger
 Arctonyx  Meles  Mellivora  Melogale  Taxidea Badger
Badger
ranges       Honey badger
Honey badger
(
[...More...]

"Badger" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Yellow Archangel
Lamium
Lamium
galeobdolon, commonly known as yellow archangel, artillery plant, or aluminium plant, is a widespread wildflower in Europe, and has been introduced elsewhere as a garden plant. It displays the zygomorphic flower morphology, opposite leaves, and square stems typical of the mint family, Lamiaceae. The flowers are soft yellow and borne in axial clusters, with a prominent 'hood' (the dorsal lobe of the corolla). It spreads easily and so has been commonly used as an ornamental ground cover. It can be invasive in places where it is not native and caution must be taken when planting in these areas.[2]Contents1 Description 2 Taxonomy 3 Distribution 4 Subspecies 5 ReferencesDescription[edit] Yellow archangel is a large-leaved perennial plant with underground runners growing to a height of about 40 to 80 cm (16 to 31 in). The paired opposite leaves are stalked, broadly ovate with a cordate base and toothed margin
[...More...]

"Yellow Archangel" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Thistle
Thistle
Thistle
is the common name of a group of flowering plants characterised by leaves with sharp prickles on the margins, mostly in the family Asteraceae. Prickles occur all over the plant – on the stem and flat parts of leaves. They are an adaptation that protects the plant from being eaten by herbivores
[...More...]

"Thistle" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Middle Ages
In the history of Europe, the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
(or Medieval Period) lasted from the 5th to the 15th century. It began with the fall of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
and merged into the Renaissance
Renaissance
and the Age of Discovery. The Middle Ages
Middle Ages
is the middle period of the three traditional divisions of Western history: classical antiquity, the medieval period, and the modern period. The medieval period is itself subdivided into the Early, High, and Late Middle Ages. Population decline, counterurbanisation, invasion, and movement of peoples, which had begun in Late Antiquity, continued in the Early Middle Ages. The large-scale movements of the Migration Period, including various Germanic peoples, formed new kingdoms in what remained of the Western Roman Empire
[...More...]

"Middle Ages" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hawkweed
Hieracium
Hieracium
/haɪ.əˈræsiəm/,[3] known by the common name hawkweed[4] and classically as hierakion (from ancient Greek ιεράξ, hierax 'hawk'),[5] is a genus of the sunflower (Helianthus) family Asteraceae), and closely related to dandelion (Taraxacum), chicory (Cichorium), prickly lettuce (Lactuca) and sow thistle (Sonchus),[6] which are part of the tribe Cichorieae
[...More...]

"Hawkweed" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Limestone
Limestone
Limestone
is a sedimentary rock, composed mainly of skeletal fragments of marine organisms such as coral, forams and molluscs. Its major materials are the minerals calcite and aragonite, which are different crystal forms of calcium carbonate (CaCO3). About 10% of sedimentary rocks are limestones. The solubility of limestone in water and weak acid solutions leads to karst landscapes, in which water erodes the limestone over thousands to millions of years
[...More...]

"Limestone" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Jurassic
The Jurassic
Jurassic
( /dʒʊˈræsɪk/; from Jura Mountains) was a geologic period and system that spanned 56 million years from the end of the Triassic
Triassic
Period 201.3 million years ago (Mya) to the beginning of the Cretaceous
Cretaceous
Period 145 Mya.[note 1] The Jurassic
Jurassic
constituted the middle period of the Mesozoic
Mesozoic
Era, also known as the Age of Reptiles. The start of the period was marked by the major Triassic–Jurassic extinction event
[...More...]

"Jurassic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.