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Cotswold Way
The Cotswold Way
Cotswold Way
is a 102-mile (164 km) long-distance footpath, running along the Cotswold Edge
Cotswold Edge
escarpment of the Cotswold Hills in England. It was officially inaugurated as a National Trail
Trail
on 24 May 2007 and several new rights of way have been created.[2]Contents1 History 2 Views 3 Places of interest 4 Other recreational use 5 Route and points of interest 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] The Cotswold Way
Cotswold Way
route was first suggested some 50 years ago by Gloucestershire-area Ramblers, of which Tony Drake (d. 7 March 2012) of Cheltenham
Cheltenham
area and the late Cyril Trenfield of the South Gloucestershire
Gloucestershire
area were principals
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Battle Of Lansdowne
Lord Hopton + Sir Bevil Grenville
Bevil Grenville
 †Strength2,500 horse 1,500 foot unknown number of guns 2,000 horse 4,000 foot 300 dragoons 16 gunsCasualties and losses20 killed 60 wounded 2-300 killed 6-700 woundedv t eFirst English Civil War1st Hull Portsmouth Powick Bridge Kings Norton Edgehill Aylesbury Brentford Chichester Turnham Green Braddock Down Leeds 1st Middlewich Hopton Heath Seacroft Moor Camp Hill Lichfield Reading Ripple Field Sourton Down Stratton Wakefield 1st Worcester Chalgrove Field Adwalton Moor Burton Bridge Lansdowne Roundway Down 1st Bristol Gainsborough Gloucester Ald
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Malvern Hills
The Malvern Hills
Malvern Hills
are a range of hills in the English counties of Worcestershire, Herefordshire
Herefordshire
and a small area of northern Gloucestershire, dominating the surrounding countryside and the towns and villages of the district of Malvern
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Sharpness
Sharpness
Sharpness
(/ʃɑːrpˈnɛs/ sharp-NESS) is an English port in Gloucestershire, one of the most inland in Britain, and eighth largest in the South West. It is on the River Severn
River Severn
at grid reference SO669027, at a point where the tidal range, though less than at Avonmouth
Avonmouth
downstream (14 metres (46 ft) typical spring tide), is still large (10 metres (33 ft) typical spring). There is a small community of approximately 100 residents directly adjacent to the port, in addition to the subvillage of Newtown approximately 0.5 miles to the west
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Forest Of Dean
The Forest of Dean
Forest of Dean
is a geographical, historical and cultural region in the western part of the county of Gloucestershire, England. It forms a roughly triangular plateau bounded by the River Wye
River Wye
to the west and northwest, Herefordshire
Herefordshire
to the north, the River Severn
River Severn
to the south, and the City of Gloucester
Gloucester
to the east. The area is characterised by more than 110 square kilometres (42 sq mi) of mixed woodland, one of the surviving ancient woodlands in England. A large area was reserved for royal hunting before 1066, and remained as the second largest crown forest in England, the largest being New Forest
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England
England
England
is a country that is part of the United Kingdom.[6][7][8] It shares land borders with Scotland
Scotland
to the north and Wales
Wales
to the west. The Irish Sea
Irish Sea
lies northwest of England
England
and the Celtic Sea
Celtic Sea
lies to the southwest. England
England
is separated from continental Europe
Europe
by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel
English Channel
to the south
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Monmouthshire
Monmouthshire
Monmouthshire
(Welsh: Sir Fynwy) is a county in south east Wales. The name derives from the historic county of Monmouthshire
Monmouthshire
of which it covers the eastern 60%. The largest town is Abergavenny. Other towns and large villages are Caldicot, Chepstow, Monmouth, Magor and Usk.Contents1 Historic county 2 Principal area 3 Places of interest 4 References 5 External linksHistoric county[edit] Main article: Monmouthshire
Monmouthshire
(historic) The historic county of Monmouthshire
Monmouthshire
was formed from the Welsh Marches by the Laws in Wales
Wales
Act 1535 and bordered Gloucestershire
Gloucestershire
to the east, Herefordshire
Herefordshire
to the northeast, Brecknockshire
Brecknockshire
to the north, and Glamorgan
Glamorgan
to the west
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Black Mountains, Wales
The Black Mountains (Welsh: Y Mynyddoedd Duon) are a group of hills spread across parts of Powys
Powys
and Monmouthshire
Monmouthshire
in southeast Wales, and extending across the England– Wales
Wales
border into Herefordshire. They are the easternmost of the four ranges of hills that comprise the Brecon Beacons
Brecon Beacons
National Park, and are frequently confused with the westernmost, which is known as the Black Mountain. The Black Mountains may be roughly defined as those hills contained within a triangle defined by the towns of Abergavenny
Abergavenny
in the southeast, Hay-on-Wye
Hay-on-Wye
in the north and the village of Llangors
Llangors
in the west. Other gateway towns to the Black Mountains include Talgarth
Talgarth
and Crickhowell
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May Hill
A hill is a landform that extends above the surrounding terrain. It often has a distinct summit, although in areas with scarp/dip topography a hill may refer to a particular section of flat terrain without a massive summit (e.g. Box Hill, Surrey).Contents1 Terminology 2 Historical significance 3 Military significance 4 Sports and games 5 Largest man-made 6 Gallery 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksTerminology[edit]Chocolate Hills of the PhilippinesHills in Tuscany, ItalyThe distinction between a hill and a mountain is unclear and largely subjective, but a hill is universally considered to be less tall and less steep than a mountain. In the United Kingdom, geographers historically regarded mountains as hills greater than 1,000 feet (304.8 meters) above sea level, which formed the basis of the plot of the 1995 film The Englishman Who Went Up a Hill But Came Down a Mountain
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Gloucester Cathedral
Gloucester
Gloucester
Cathedral, formally the Cathedral Church of St Peter and the Holy and Indivisible Trinity, in Gloucester, England, stands in the north of the city near the River Severn. It originated in 678 or 679 with the foundation of an abbey dedicated to Saint Peter (dissolved by Henry VIII).Contents1 History1.1 Foundations 1.2 Construction and architecture1.2.1 Recent Construction 1.2.2 Misericords2 Dean and chapter 3 Music3.1 Organ 3.2 Organists 3.3 Three Choirs Festival4 Clock and bells4.1 Clock 4.2 Bells5 Burials and monuments 6 Film and TV location 7 Academic use 8 Timeline 9 See also 10 Notes 11 References 12 External linksHistory[edit] Foundations[edit] Wardle records that in 1058 Ealdred, Bishop of Worcester
Bishop of Worcester
at the time, rebuilt the church of St Peter.[2] The foundations of the present church were laid by Abbot
Abbot
Serlo (1072–1104)
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Severn Crossing
Severn
Severn
crossing is a term used to refer to the two motorway crossings over the River Severn
River Severn
estuary between England and Wales operated by Highways England. The two crossings are: Severn Bridge
Severn Bridge
(Welsh: Pont Hafren) Second Severn Crossing
Second Severn Crossing
(Welsh: Ail Groesfan Hafren)The first motorway suspension bridge was inaugurated on 8 September 1966, and the newer cable-stayed bridge, a few miles to the south, was inaugurated on 5 June 1996. The Second Severn Crossing
Second Severn Crossing
marks the upper limit of the Severn
Severn
Estuary. From 1966 to 1996, the bridge carried the M4 motorway
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Devil's Chimney (Gloucestershire)
For other landscape features of the same name see Devil's Chimney (other). The Devil's Chimney is a limestone rock formation that stands above a disused quarry in Leckhampton, near Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, England. It is named for its peculiar shape, that of a crooked and twisted chimney rising from the ground. The Devil's Chimney is a local landmark, but its origins are uncertain. In 1926 it survived an earthquake, but not without a few cracks. In 1985 it was repaired and protected from further erosion. Local legend[edit] Legend holds that the Devil's Chimney is the chimney of the Devil's dwelling deep beneath the ground. Supposedly the Devil, provoked by the many Christian churches of the area, would sit atop Leckhampton Hill and hurl stones at Sunday churchgoers. However the stones were turned back on him, driving him beneath the ground and trapping him there so he could not further harass the villagers
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Leckhampton
Leckhampton
Leckhampton
is a district in south Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, England. The area constitutes a civil parish and is part of the district of Cheltenham. The population of the civil parish taken at the 2011 census was 4,409.[1]Contents1 History1.1 The Leckhampton
Leckhampton
Riots2 The Leckhampton
Leckhampton
community2.1 Churches 2.2 School 2.3 Leckhampton
Leckhampton
Cricket
Cricket
Club 2.4 Hospitals 2.5 Scouting3 Geography 4 References 5 Further readingHistory[edit] Leckhampton
Leckhampton
is mentioned in the Domesday Book
Domesday Book
(1086) as 'Lechametone'[2] and 'Lechantone', meaning 'homestead where garlic or leeks are grown'
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Vale Of Evesham
Evesham (/ˈivʃəm/, /ˈivɪʃəm/, or /ˈisəm/)[2] is a market town and parish in the Wychavon district of Worcestershire, southern England with a population of 23,576, according to the 2011 census. It is located roughly equidistant between Worcester, Cheltenham and Stratford-upon-Avon. It lies within the Vale of Evesham, an area comprising the flood plain of the River Avon, which has been renowned for market gardening. The town centre, situated within a meander of the river, is regularly subject to flooding. The 2007 floods were the most severe in recorded history. The town was founded around an 8th-century abbey, one of the largest in Europe, which was destroyed during the Dissolution of the Monasteries, with only Abbot Lichfield's Bell Tower remaining
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Clee Hills
The Clee Hills are a range of hills in Shropshire, England near Ludlow, consisting of Brown Clee Hill 1,772 feet (540 m), the highest peak in Shropshire, and Titterstone Clee Hill 1,749 feet (533 m). They are both in the Shropshire Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.Contents1 Geography1.1 The View2 The hills in popular culture 3 Terminology 4 External linksGeography[edit] The hills stretch over 15 miles and run north - south, and for about this distance the lowest point along the hills is just under 984 feet (300 m). Titterstone Clee Hill is around five miles south of Brown Clee Hill. The B4364 road from Ludlow to Bridgnorth runs between the two hills, offering good views of both. The hills have been said to form a "gateway" from the built up areas of the West Midlands to the hills and rural landscape of Wales and are at the heart of the Welsh Marches
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Ludlow
Ludlow
Ludlow
is a market town in Shropshire, England, 28 miles (45 km) south of Shrewsbury
Shrewsbury
and 23 miles (37 km) north of Hereford
Hereford
via the main A49 road, which bypasses the town. With a population of approximately 11,000, Ludlow
Ludlow
is the largest town in south Shropshire. The town is significant in the history of the Welsh Marches
Welsh Marches
and neighbouring Wales. The town is near the confluence of the rivers Corve and Teme. The oldest part is the medieval walled town, founded in the late 11th century after the Norman conquest of England
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