HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Cosmetics
Cosmetics
Cosmetics
are substances or products used to enhance or alter the appearance or fragrance of the body. Many cosmetics are designed for use of applying to the face and hair. They are generally mixtures of chemical compounds; some being derived from natural sources (such as coconut oil), and some being synthetics.[1] Common cosmetics include lipstick, mascara, eye shadow, foundation, rouge, skin cleansers and skin lotions, shampoo, hairstyling products (gel, hair spray, etc.), perfume and cologne. Cosmetics
Cosmetics
applied to the face to enhance its appearance are often called make-up or makeup. In the U.S., the Food and Drug Administration
Food and Drug Administration
(FDA), which regulates cosmetics,[2] defines cosmetics as "intended to be applied to the human body for cleansing, beautifying, promoting attractiveness, or altering the appearance without affecting the body's structure or functions"
[...More...]

"Cosmetics" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Traditional Chinese Medicine
Traditional Chinese medicine
Traditional Chinese medicine
(TCM; simplified Chinese: 中医; traditional Chinese: 中醫; pinyin: Zhōngyī) is a style of traditional medicine built on a foundation of more than 2,500 years of Chinese medical practice that includes various forms of herbal medicine, acupuncture, massage (tui na), exercise (qigong), and dietary therapy,[1] but recently also influenced by modern Western medicine
[...More...]

"Traditional Chinese Medicine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Cream (pharmaceutical)
A cream is a preparation usually for application to the skin. Creams for application to mucous membranes such as those of the rectum or vagina are also used. Creams may be considered pharmaceutical products as even cosmetic creams are based on techniques developed by pharmacy and unmedicated creams are highly used in a variety of skin conditions (dermatoses). The use of the finger tip unit concept may be helpful in guiding how much topical cream is required to cover different areas. Creams are semi-solid emulsions of oil and water. They are divided into two types: oil-in-water (O/W) creams which are composed of small droplets of oil dispersed in a continuous water phase, and water-in-oil (W/O) creams which are composed of small droplets of water dispersed in a continuous oily phase. Oil-in-water creams are more comfortable and cosmetically acceptable as they are less greasy and more easily washed off using water
[...More...]

"Cream (pharmaceutical)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ancient Greek
The Ancient Greek language
Greek language
includes the forms of Greek used in ancient Greece
Greece
and the ancient world from around the 9th century BC to the 6th century AD. It is often roughly divided into the Archaic period (9th to 6th centuries BC), Classical period (5th and 4th centuries BC), and Hellenistic period
Hellenistic period
(Koine Greek, 3rd century BC to the 4th century AD). It is antedated in the second millennium BC by Mycenaean Greek and succeeded by medieval Greek. Koine is regarded as a separate historical stage of its own, although in its earliest form it closely resembled Attic Greek
Attic Greek
and in its latest form it approaches Medieval Greek
[...More...]

"Ancient Greek" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Museo Del Objeto Del Objeto
The Museo del Objeto del Objeto
Museo del Objeto del Objeto
( Museum
Museum
of the Object [purpose] of the Object [item]), or MODO, is a museum in Mexico City
Mexico City
and the first museum in Mexico
Mexico
dedicated to design and communications. It was opened in 2010 based on a collection of commercial packaging, advertising, graphic arts, common devices and many other objects dating back to 1810 collected by Bruno Newman
Bruno Newman
over more than forty years. The museum is dedicated to the preservation of its collection of more than 30,000 items from two centuries, and it is dedicated to the research in the history of design and communications, as well as the promotion of collecting in general
[...More...]

"Museo Del Objeto Del Objeto" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Henri De Toulouse-Lautrec
Henri Marie Raymond de Toulouse-Lautrec-Monfa (24 November 1864 – 9 September 1901), also known as Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (French: [ɑ̃ʁi də tuluz lotʁɛk]), was a French painter, printmaker, draughtsman, caricaturist, and illustrator whose immersion in the colourful and theatrical life of Paris in the late 19th century allowed him to produce a collection of enticing, elegant, and provocative images of the modern, sometimes decadent, affairs of those times. Toulouse-Lautrec is among the best-known painters of the Post-Impressionist period, with Cézanne, Van Gogh, and Gauguin
[...More...]

"Henri De Toulouse-Lautrec" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Gemstone
A gemstone (also called a gem, fine gem, jewel, precious stone, or semi-precious stone) is a piece of mineral crystal which, in cut and polished form, is used to make jewelry or other adornments.[1][2] However, certain rocks (such as lapis lazuli, opal, and jade) or organic materials that are not minerals (such as amber, jet, and pearl) are also used for jewelry and are therefore often considered to be gemstones as well. Most gemstones are hard, but some soft minerals are used in jewelry because of their luster or other physical properties that have aesthetic value. Rarity is another characteristic that lends value to a gemstone. Apart from jewelry, from earliest antiquity engraved gems and hardstone carvings, such as cups, were major luxury art forms. A gem maker is called a lapidary or gemcutter; a diamond worker is a diamantaire
[...More...]

"Gemstone" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Nefertiti Bust
The Nefertiti
Nefertiti
Bust is a painted stucco-coated limestone bust of Nefertiti, the Great Royal Wife
Great Royal Wife
of the Egyptian Pharaoh
Pharaoh
Akhenaten.[2] The work is believed to have been crafted in 1345 B.C. by the sculptor Thutmose, because it was found in his workshop in Amarna, Egypt.[3] It is one of the most copied works of ancient Egypt
[...More...]

"Nefertiti Bust" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Indus Valley Civilisation
The Indus Valley Civilisation
Indus Valley Civilisation
(IVC), or Harappan Civilisation,[1] was a Bronze Age
Bronze Age
civilisation (3300–1300 BCE; mature period 2600–1900 BCE) m
[...More...]

"Indus Valley Civilisation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Eau De Cologne
Eau de Cologne
Cologne
(French: [o d(ə) kɔlɔɲ]; German: Kölnisch Wasser [ˈkœlnɪʃ ˈvasɐ]; meaning “Water from Cologne”), or simply cologne, is a perfume originating from Cologne, Germany. Originally mixed by Johann Maria Farina
Johann Maria Farina
in 1709, it has since come to be a generic term for scented formulations in typical concentration of 2%–5% and also more depending upon its type essential oils or a blend of extracts, alcohol, and water. In a base of dilute ethanol (70%–90%), eau de cologne contains a mixture of citrus oils including oils of lemon, orange, tangerine, clementine, bergamot, lime, grapefruit, blood orange, and bitter orange
[...More...]

"Eau De Cologne" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Seaweed
Seaweed
Seaweed
or macroalgae refers to several species of macroscopic, multicellular, marine algae.[1] The term includes some types of red, brown, and green macroalgae. Seaweed
Seaweed
offer excellent opportunities for its industrial exploitation as they could be a source of multiple compounds (i.e. polysaccharides, proteins and phenols) with applications as food [2][3] and animal feed,[3] pharmaceuticals [4] or fertilizersContents1 Taxonomy 2 Structure 3 Ecology 4 Uses4.1 Food 4.2 Herbalism 4.3 Filtration 4.4 Other uses4.4.1 Photo essay showing women in Zanzibar, Tanzania farming seaweed and making seaweed soap5 Health risks 6 Genera 7 See also 8 References 9 Further reading 10 External linksTaxonomy[edit] "Seaweed" is a colloquial term and lacks a formal definition. A seaweed may belong to one of several groups of multicellular algae: the red algae, green algae, and brown algae
[...More...]

"Seaweed" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Iodine
Iodine
Iodine
is a chemical element with symbol I and atomic number 53. The heaviest of the stable halogens, it exists as a lustrous, purple-black metallic solid at standard conditions that sublimes readily to form a violet gas. The elemental form was discovered by the French chemist Bernard Courtois in 1811. It was named two years later by Joseph-Louis Gay-Lussac from this property, after the Greek ἰώδης "violet-coloured". Iodine
Iodine
occurs in many oxidation states, including iodide (I−), iodate (IO− 3), and the various periodate anions. It is the least abundant of the stable halogens, being the sixty-first most abundant element. It is even less abundant than the so-called rare earths. It is the heaviest essential mineral nutrient
[...More...]

"Iodine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Bromine
Bromine
Bromine
is a chemical element with symbol Br and atomic number 35. It is the third-lightest halogen, and is a fuming red-brown liquid at room temperature that evaporates readily to form a similarly coloured gas. Its properties are thus intermediate between those of chlorine and iodine. Isolated independently by two chemists, Carl Jacob Löwig (in 1825) and Antoine Jérôme Balard
Antoine Jérôme Balard
(in 1826), its name was derived from the Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
βρῶμος ("stench"), referencing its sharp and disagreeable smell. Elemental bromine is very reactive and thus does not occur free in nature, but in colourless soluble crystalline mineral halide salts, analogous to table salt. While it is rather rare in the Earth's crust, the high solubility of the bromide ion (Br−) has caused its accumulation in the oceans
[...More...]

"Bromine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Iridescence
Iridescence
Iridescence
(also known as goniochromism) is the phenomenon of certain surfaces that appear to gradually change colour as the angle of view or the angle of illumination changes. Examples of iridescence include soap bubbles, butterfly wings and seashells, as well as certain minerals
[...More...]

"Iridescence" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Liniment
Liniment
Liniment
(or embrocation), from the Latin
Latin
linere, to anoint, is a medicated topical preparation for application to the skin. Sometimes called balms or heat rubs, liniments are of a similar or lesser viscosity than lotions and are rubbed in to create friction, unlike lotions, ointments or creams,[1][2] but patches, sticks and sprays are also available. Liniments are typically sold to relieve pain and stiffness, such as from sore muscular aches and strains, or arthritis. These are typically formulated from alcohol, acetone, or similar quickly evaporating solvents and contain counterirritant aromatic chemical compounds such as methyl salicilate, benzoin resin, menthol, or capsaicin
[...More...]

"Liniment" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Beeswax
Beeswax
Beeswax
(cera alba) is a natural wax produced by honey bees of the genus Apis. The wax is formed into "scales" by eight wax-producing glands in the abdominal segments of worker bees, who discard it in or at the hive. The hive workers collect and use it to form cells for honey-storage and larval and pupal protection within the beehive. Chemically, beeswax consists mainly of esters of fatty acids and various long-chain alcohols. Beeswax
Beeswax
has long-standing applications in human food and flavoring. For example, it is used as a glazing agent or as a light/heat source. It is edible, in the sense of having similar negligible toxicity to plant waxes, and is approved for food use in most countries and the European Union
European Union
under the E number
E number
E901
[...More...]

"Beeswax" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.